Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Potato Puree, Mashed Potatoes, Pommes


Recommended Posts

  • 5 months later...

I compared riced vs traditionally mashed Yukon golds tonight. 

 

Each has virtues. 

 

Riced are smoother and accept the cream better. But they near the border of gumminess, like you get from food processor mashed. This is a classy restaurant product,  but somehow lacking. 

 

Mashed incorporate the cream with difficulty, but taste ....cleaner...with no hint of gumminess.  

 

The best product was when I mixed mashed and riced 50:50 

 

Thoughts?

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, gfweb said:

I compared riced vs traditionally mashed Yukon golds tonight. 

 

Each has virtues. 

 

Riced are smoother and accept the cream better. But they near the border of gumminess, like you get from food processor mashed. This is a classy restaurant product,  but somehow lacking. 

 

Mashed incorporate the cream with difficulty, but taste ....cleaner...with no hint of gumminess.  

 

The best product was when I mixed mashed and riced 50:50 

 

Thoughts?

 

Philistine.  Rice russets.  I put my russets through the ricer then scrape them through a tamis.  Incorporate warm milk, then butter.  Lots of butter.  But milk first.  Or Herve This will haunt you.

 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Philistine.  Rice russets.  I put my russets through the ricer then scrape them through a tamis.  Incorporate warm milk, then butter.  Lots of butter.  But milk first.  Or Herve This will haunt you.

 

Ewww. Russets. 

Herve T has  a fine book. But 

Lots of work to make Russets acceptable....rice, scrape, tamis. 

Heston Blumenthal likes Yukon golds. I like Heston 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to use fingerlings in a ricer,  then I dry in a pan on the stovetop and then beat in only butter... no milk or cream for me.  After the butter is incorporated, this mixture goes through the tamis, and then finally thinned with a bit of the starchy potato boiling water.

Edited by KennethT (log)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I make my puree by placing halved potatoes  (peeled or unpeeled, you'll see why in a bit) in cold, and heavily salted, and bring it to a simmer until they are sufficiently soft, then I strain into a metal colander with a mesh of small holes, shake to dry and then push them through this same colander with a large pestle or spoon and add around tablespoon of butter per potato and also cream cheese, and fold in pepper, garlic powder, and salt. I then sometimes fold in cheese, but that's optional. The skins are removed by the colander. I find cream to be too thin, and not as rich as cream cheese, as I like a solid quenelle rather than a soupy puree. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kayb said:

Y'all are awfully complex. I hit mine with the potato masher, then stir in cream and butter with a spoon. Works for me.

 

 

Me too. Unless I'm doing fingerlings or new potatoes which I ain't peeling...them, I rice. 

 

And i prefer a firmer texture. Shouldn't slump on the plate in most situations. They aren't grits after all.  

 

 And if whipped as opposed to riced or mashed..they ought not have a slimy sheen ...which takes a finer hand with a food processor than I have. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

 And if whipped as opposed to riced or mashed..they ought not have a slimy sheen ...which takes a finer hand with a food processor than I have. 

 

Why don't you use a whisk?  You could probably just chuck it in a Kitchenaid and leave it to whip.

 

I've never had good results from a blender or food processor.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jmacnaughtan said:

 

 

 

I've never had good results from a blender or food processor.

 

That was my point.

 

A whisk, to me, is a pain to use for potatoes unless they are really loose.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

That was my point.

 

A whisk, to me, is a pain to use for potatoes unless they are really loose.

 

Ah.  You may need more butter then ;)  I find if you use cold butter, it lightens up well and doesn't go runny, even when you reach 50/50 levels.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, jmacnaughtan said:

 

Ah.  You may need more butter then ;)  I find if you use cold butter, it lightens up well and doesn't go runny, even when you reach 50/50 levels.

 I tend to use cream. Butter might be just the thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 10 months later...

Just a thought; I stumbled over something new last night.  I was cooking on my Paragon induction unit.  I boiled my quartered (more or less) russet potatoes as usual, riced them, passed them though the tamis -- then let them rest in a warm oven while I heated the oil for frying my sous vide chicken thigh.

 

In the oven the potatoes dried out a bit.  Had I to say, they looked a little like instant mashed potato flakes.  (Not that I should know.)  But what's remarkable, when mixed with warm milk a la Herve This and with a bit of tempered butter they were possibly the best mashed potatoes I have tasted:

 

Dinner09072019.png

 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...