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fergal

Kitchenless in London

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Fellow readers,

I live in London and am getting a new kitchen installed. It's going to take 4 weeks (still not sure why!)

this could present many opportunities or problems depending on your point of view from a culinary perspective.

A person has got to eat.....

i don't want to bankrupt myself or become (more) obese so what would you recommend I do to fill these weeks without a kitchen?

is there some food/eating challenge to attempt?

fergal

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Have you seen the cookbook "Manifest Destiny"? It shows you how to cook on your car engine--with mileage instead of cooking times :laugh:

I have a Japanese butane grill burner for tabletop and mobile cooking. Comes in handy when there is no stove.

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borrow your friends' kitchens

offer to cook for them as long as they buy the ingredients and do the washing up

:smile:


"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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How about buying a cheap baby belling? You need to get inventive and think like a student, but in might be fun! (also alot cheaper than eating out every night, although not nearly so much fun!)

Our first flat had a baby belling, and not much else, andits long enough ago to have fond memories!! :biggrin:


http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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Raw vegetables? Serious protein deficiency but might be fun.

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it's no fun i lost count of the weeks we were kitchenless i think it was 6 or more, cooked on a 2 electric ring 'stove' and washed up upstairs in the bath. not fun, though you'll survive, a baby belling would have been positive luxury!


you don't win friends with salad

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I think the problem you inevitably have is that whilst eating out is lots of fun, once you don't have the option to eat at home and are forced to eat out, it becomes a chore and you just long for a warm comfort meal at home

On that basis I'd go for that baby belling.

And by the way - it won't be 4 weeks - it will be 8 - at least, trust me :wink: ....

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Get a month's worth of MRE ration packs, live off them and sell the story to a magazine :biggrin:


Tim Hayward

"Anyone who wants to write about food would do well to stay away from

similes and metaphors, because if you're not careful, expressions like

'light as a feather' make their way into your sentences and then where are you?"

Nora Ephron

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Suggest you get a combination microwave/grill/fan oven and a basic electric hot ring or two.

These will plug into any standard mains socket, don't take much space, and give you amazing versatility.

You could go for new and high end, or used and local paper small ads. You could spend hundreds on a deDietrich/Neff/Siemens combo oven (and build it into your new kitchen) or collect a local £15 bargain. For the electric rings, you just might be interested in checking out the 'induction hotplate' offerings for something you'd want to keep and even use in the new kitchen (but do check your pan bases with a magnet - for induction compatibility - first!)

In a former life, I "camped out in a sort of a building site" for a couple of years, suffering cooking in a Panasonic combi oven and on a bizarre (Czech?) pair of electric rings. Happiest time of my life probably.

Menu planning for entertaining did have to be considered quite carefully though!

On the other hand, my student memories of a Baby Belling were, um, rather more limited...

PS - don't part with the old fridge until the new one is actually usable...


Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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What would one of those Baby Bellings run you? It looks like it's two burners and a little oven, is that the deal?

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thanks for your replies. unfortunately cooking elsewhere in the flat is not an option. we have a fridge though.

The idea of a raw vegetable does seem quite appealing from a health perspective.

I am wondering though whether I should try and do a cookery course or shameless try to get myself invited to as many dinner parties as possible; a bit like Come Dine With Me without the reciprocation

maybe I should do a circle line restaurant crawl.....

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It's summer; time to get a BBQ :biggrin:


"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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Do you have small appliances such as an electric teakettle and a (micom/fuzzy) rice cooker?

I can't imagine surviving a remodel without proper tea! Many things can be prepared in the latter (main dishes, whole grains, soups, desserts such as bread pudding) and, being compact, could even be temporarily set up in the bathroom, hall, or whatever.

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a 3 tier electric steamer )and the kind of cheap electric fryingpan/slow cooker/food warmer that you can buy in Turkish Shops in Green Lanes (for some reason called pizza cookers) would cost about £60 all together,be surprisingly useful in the future even when u have a functioning kitchen .and enable you to feed 6 people pretty easily.

you couldn't do any baking or a roast dinner, but you'd still be able to knock out a decent variety of meals.

gethin

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Four weeks to copy the film 'Supersize Me' ?

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if you want to really be practical - since it is summer, hot food you can do without all the time. my plan would be simple:

so hot and/or proper food when you go out.

at home since you'll have a firdge i would stock up on the following: pates, cornichons, anchovies, tuna, smoked mackrel, horseradish, butter, lemon, capers, mustard, tabasco, etc....then i would buy excellent bread, wine, and loads of cheese...along with any of: smoked salmon, charcuterie, roast beef, maybe some tomatoes, good yoghurts and fruit. guaranteed you'll eat better than when you go out!

-che


Edited by CheGuevara (log)

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Has George Foreman introduced his amazing grill this side of the world? If so, go buy one now! U can grill anything, and cleanup is a snap!

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A useful thread! We'll have this problem in the near future. Moving into a house, don't already have a fridge, and we're redoing the whole thing. It might be as much as 12 weeks for us without a real kitchen. We're still trying to decide just how much equipment to buy to tide us over. At least it'll mostly be summer and thus grilling is an option.

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The idea of a raw vegetable does seem quite appealing from a health perspective.

The book I linked here has some gastronomically-inclined raw vegetable based recipes...


Ian

I go to bakeries, all day long.

There's a lack of sweetness in my life...

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gas barbeque. i use mine all the time even when not barbecueing, great bit of kit. no mess, easily controlled cooking, little burner on the side for pans, all different levels inside, gets bloody hot, lid down it acts just like an oven.. not sure i would recommend it for souffle or custard tart but i reckon i could survive with it for a while

its the way forward


Matt Christmas.

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