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Foodblog: SobaAddict70


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do you find your produce spoils faster in the plastic bags?

it looks incredible! the champane current jelly, who makes that?

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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do you find your produce spoils faster in the plastic bags?

You'd think that, but that hasn't been the case for some reason.

It looks like a lot of food but everything gets eaten within a couple weeks of purchase. The lack of junk food in the apartment ensures that.

it looks incredible! the champane current jelly, who makes that?

Berkshire Berries.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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I could be very happy living in your fridge. Everything is so fresh and vibrant.  :smile:  The market pics were a treat! Thanks for taking us around, this week. And for the asparagus-peels stock tip.

I eat A LOT of asparagus so I usually save the peelings and ends for vegetarian stock. You'll see some of that later this week.

Lunch will be at one of my favorite NYC restaurants. I'll give you a hint....it was good when it first began and it's even better now. :wink:

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All the vegetables look so perfect in color and shape! Are they genetically influenced or something? Everything seems soperfect thatit seems unreal! Wow! DO they taste as wonderful as they look? Do you eat broccoli sprouts?

You're scaring me, Lior. :unsure:

I'll eat anything as long as its not epoisses/cabrales, jellied eels or gefilte fish. In other words, stinky cheese or overly gelatinous stuff. Natto on the other hand is fair game.

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I hope you'll give us some neighborhood pictures to help me get my NYC fix!!

Your wish is my command....

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Park Avenue South looking north to the Metlife building

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Somewhere near Irving Place

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Irving Place and East 19th Street, southern exposure

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Fifth Avenue and East 18th Street, viewing north to the Empire State Building

Now why was Soba in that neighborhoood...? :wink:

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Lunch at Gramercy Tavern today...

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Chilled nettles soup with asparagus and pickled ramps

2007 Txakoli Getariako, Txomin Etxaniz, Basque, Spain

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Seared scallop with spring minestrone (green garlic, cippolini onion, fava beans)

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Sable, potato and leek puree, potato "croutons", American paddlefish caviar

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Veal, braised pork belly, roasted Adirondack blue potatoes, baby turnips

2001 Ramirez de la Piscina Rioja, Rioja, Spain

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Vanilla chantilly cream, shortcake, whipped cream, rhubarb and strawberry puree

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Roasted almond sorbet, caramel citrus tart, candied orange, meringue tuille

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Mignardises

Gramercy Tavern is located at 18 East 20th Street (Park Avenue South) in the Flatiron district of Manhattan.

Here is the discussion thread in the New York forum.

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Wow.

THUMP.... (That was me swooning after all the wonderful produce and excellent food, and falling off the chair).

I used to live near Gramercy Park and Irving Place, thanks for the pix!

Edited by JeanneCake (log)
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Wow, Soba, your NYC kitchen looks a lot like my Florida condo kitchen, only cleaner! :raz: Beautiful pictures, and oh, boy, do I miss New York City! :wub:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Thanks folks.

I just wish I had a bigger kitchen.

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My three newest "toys", courtesy of a friend in Vermont. PM me if you'd like more information. The peach butter is like liquid sunshine when paired with ice cream. Or apple pie. Or cheddar cheese. Or crepes. Or pancakes. You get the idea... :biggrin:

Late dinner tonight after this afternoon's extravaganza -- and totally polar opposite:

gallery_28660_6023_128046.jpg

Greens and potatoes

Basically lamb's quarters and heirloom potatoes cooked separately, then cooked with garlic (6 cloves!), chopped tomatoes and plenty of olive oil.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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Mmm, pm sent on those jams!

Soba, does wrapping your ginger in foil help at all? I never seem to use mine fast enough, and I can't bring myself to freeze it or put it in alcohol (the methods of storage I've heard to use).

"I know it's the bugs, that's what cheese is. Gone off milk with bugs and mould - that's why it tastes so good. Cows and bugs together have a good deal going down."

- Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry), Chef!

eG Ethics Signatory

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Aaaah!  Rick's Picks!  My favorite.

Soba, great blog so far.  I didn't realize you were a fellow UES'er.  Do you ever eat out in the 'hood?

Cafe D'Alsace a couple of times. Naruto Ramen satisfies my noodle cravings when I don't want to schlep downtown.

There are a couple of Hungarian places in the lower 80s I've been meaning to go to. Is Etats-Unis still good?

Otherwise I'm more of a south-of-23rd Street person. There may be a visit or two later in the week.

I still love Etats-Unis, though, to be honest, I've been to the restaurant about twice in three years. The Bar I visit at least two or three times a month. It's a great local find, particularly in our area. All of the food is good, some of it surprisingly terrific, like the guacamole, the chilaquiles, and the date pudding.

Keep blogging...am loving that I'm not the only one schlepping down to Union Square every weekend. Maybe I'll see you there Saturday morning! I'm planning to go wicked early to beat the crowds, and, more important, the heat.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Thanks folks.

I just wish I had a bigger kitchen.

gallery_28660_6023_8847.jpg

gallery_28660_6023_203901.jpg

gallery_28660_6023_15451.jpg

My three newest "toys", courtesy of a friend in Vermont.  PM me if you'd like more information.  The peach butter is like liquid sunshine when paired with ice cream.  Or apple pie.  Or cheddar cheese.  Or crepes.  Or pancakes.  You get the idea... :biggrin:

Late dinner tonight after this afternoon's extravaganza -- and totally polar opposite:

gallery_28660_6023_128046.jpg

Greens and potatoes

Basically lamb's quarters and heirloom potatoes cooked separately, then cooked with garlic (6 cloves!), chopped tomatoes and plenty of olive oil.

Beautiful salad, but I have to ask, what's that purple thing at about 5 o'clock in the bowl? Most BEAUTIFUL color!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I made two attempts at poached eggs based on your instructions, and for some reason, I get a lot of egg white floaties, and a poached egg that looks more like a cross between sunnyside up and over-easy. I think I just suck at it.

I can't believe you don't eat much rice! What kind of Filipino are you?!?!? :angry::laugh:

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Thanks folks.

I just wish I had a bigger kitchen.

gallery_28660_6023_8847.jpg

gallery_28660_6023_203901.jpg

gallery_28660_6023_15451.jpg

My three newest "toys", courtesy of a friend in Vermont.  PM me if you'd like more information.  The peach butter is like liquid sunshine when paired with ice cream.  Or apple pie.  Or cheddar cheese.  Or crepes.  Or pancakes.  You get the idea... :biggrin:

Late dinner tonight after this afternoon's extravaganza -- and totally polar opposite:

gallery_28660_6023_128046.jpg

Greens and potatoes

Basically lamb's quarters and heirloom potatoes cooked separately, then cooked with garlic (6 cloves!), chopped tomatoes and plenty of olive oil.

Beautiful salad, but I have to ask, what's that purple thing at about 5 o'clock in the bowl? Most BEAUTIFUL color!

Those are purple Peruvian fingerling potatoes. ;)

My internet gave out yesterday, hence no pix. Also I've been working through a lot of leftovers. I tend to make too much food to consume in one sitting.

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I made two attempts at poached eggs based on your instructions, and for some reason, I get a lot of egg white floaties, and a poached egg that looks more like a cross between sunnyside up and over-easy.  I think I just suck at it. 

I can't believe you don't eat much rice!  What kind of Filipino are you?!?!?  :angry:  :laugh:

On the other hand, I've never met a carb I didn't like.

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Prasantrin --

If time permits (or perhaps I'll post on a separate thread), I'll do a mini demo on poaching eggs. Or at least how Spamwise poaches eggs. I tend to do stereotypically geeky things like talking about myself in the third person. ;)

This was dinner last night -- fresh pasta with radish greens and toasted breadcrumbs.

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Heirloom radishes and greens. The radishes will be braised with butter and herbs, likely for dinner Saturday. I'm still formulating this weekend's menu.

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Tip: When sauteeing garlic and onion in olive oil or butter, best to start in a cold pan. This will prevent the garlic from cooking too quickly. You can time things better.

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Add a pinch of red pepper flakes to taste.

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Add the greens once the garlic takes on a bit of color. Also a pinch of salt and a splash of acid such as vinegar or lemon juice to help brighten flavor. Cook or until greens are bright green yet tender, about 1 to 2 minutes. Be careful not to overcook.

Ideally, prepare this sauce as pasta cooks or nears completion. Drain pasta, reserving 2 to 3 T. pasta cooking water. Fold in pasta and cooking water to greens mixture. Top with toasted breadcrumbs. You could sub in Parm cheese if you like. I prefer to keep flavors simple in order to let the greens shine through. Maybe a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil and some cracked black pepper.

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I'm going to be in and out a lot this weekend. The Big Apple BBQ Block Party takes place tomorrow and Sunday so you can expect a truckload of pix to come. (Here is the thread in the New York forum.)

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Mmm, pm sent on those jams!

Soba, does wrapping your ginger in foil help at all? I never seem to use mine fast enough, and I can't bring myself to freeze it or put it in alcohol (the methods of storage I've heard to use).

Just saw this. I usually wrap things in perforated plastic bags. Helps the veggies "breathe". I think that I must have run out of plastic bags so I used foil instead.

I'm recovering from a late spring cold (99.9% gone, just a lingering cough at this point but nothing contagious). When I was growing up, it always took me nearly two to three weeks to get over a cold. I attribute this latest incident to lots of liquid, lots of tea, Nyquil and bed rest. Especially ginger tea (see recipe below).

Ginger tea

Slice ginger into 1/2" thick pieces. Leave ginger unpeeled. Bring two cups of water to a boil and add ginger. Lower heat and simmer for ten to fifteen minutes. Strain, reserving ginger slices. Sweeten to taste with honey and lemon and sip while hot.

Ginger can be reused for one or two additional infusions. Five pieces is sufficient per batch.

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I figured I'd do the demo now because I'm headed out the door in a couple hours. I'll be meeting Jason and Rachel for dinner. We might take some preview pictures of tomorrow's festivities.

Also, because I can't resist eating my product, I made a snack to go along with the poached egg. Two for the price of one. :raz:

So here's the poached egg demo:

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I've found the size of the pot is relative. You also want enough water to cover the egg. Figure a depth of two to three inches is sufficient.

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1 T. of white wine vinegar. Not necessary but it helps in my experience.

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You can break the egg directly into the pot when it comes time to slip it in. I find that having the egg in a ramekin or small container works best for me.

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When the water reaches this stage, immediately turn the heat down. Bubbles should barely break the surface.

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Stir water vigorously in a continuous clockwise or counterclockwise motion. A vortex will form, after which you should gently slip the egg in. Bring the container as low to the surface of the water as possible before tipping.

How long you poach your egg depends on the freshness of product as well as desired consistency. This was one of the eggs I had picked up from last weekend and still quite fresh. I poached it for 80 seconds. 2 to 3 minutes is standard for a regular supermarket egg.

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Voila.

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Trim asparagus. Be sure to leave the tips whole. Peelings and ends can be reserved for stock. Toss with a pinch of kosher salt and 2 T. extra-virgin olive oil. Roast for 10 minutes at 325 F.

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Top asparagus with a poached egg and shaved Parmesan cheese. Serve at once.

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Soba, you've inspired me to go to the farmers market tomorrow and get as much green stuff as I can find.

btw prasantrin, your egg white floaties could be the result of a not so fresh egg. The older the egg, the runnier the whites, and the harder it is to poach. It can still be a perfectly good egg for eating, just not for poaching!

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