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soba-

have really enjoyed your dinner pictures.  our local farmer's market doesn't start until 22 june :angry: .

when you say quatto do you mean quattro's from up in pleasant valley?

with the medication you take do you have any side effects that affect your appetite?  any tinny taste in the mouth or loss of appetite?  if so how do you talk yourself into eating and drinking the approprite nutrition to maintain?

Yes, Quattro Farm. Besides chicken eggs, they had duck ($6 for a dozen) and pheasant eggs ($8 for a dozen) as well. Chicken eggs are priced at $3.50/dz.

Yes they're expensive (compared to store bought eggs). However, they're fresher and more flavorful.

Re medication...so far I haven't had to deal with any dietary side effects (*knock on wood*). There ARE physical side effects mind you but those have to do with the nervous system, and in my case they've been quite mild.

There hasn't been a pill invented yet that could make this hobbit stop eating. :wink:

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I am officially inspired to have greens topped with a poached egg on top for dinner this week.  :wink:

So happy to see you blogging this week! I like how you let us know about how you keep HIV in check.....What you eat looks nothing like the neutropenic diet that I so often think of when it comes to immunocompromised systems. As questionable as extreme versions of it is in terms of effectiveness, was that ever mentioned as a consideration?

Can't wait to see more of your inspiring creations.....  :smile:

Thanks for the support, Sony.

I think a large part of my present circumstances has to deal with the fact that I got on the antiretroviral bandwagon so early, in addition to keeping a positive attitude, working out and getting my weight up.

It's never been a consideration. I do keep on top of my statistics but as I've mentioned before, I can't worry about the unknown. That's an early path to the grave.

I have no intention of going anywhere anytime soon. Too many meals to look forward to. :wink:

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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Here's a pic of some lamb's quarters I picked up from this Saturday. I know the usual greens treatment -- EVOO/garlic/lemon. What else can I do with them? Ideas appreciated.

When I gardened for a couple of years in Iowa and had an abundance (I was lucky enough to have amaranth, lambsquarters, and purslane as my 3 most common weeds) of greens, I would give a bunch the standard treatment then freeze them. Lambsquarters is generally a good substitute for spinach and is great in recipes where you wish spinach had a little more texture. My two favorites were a fish/lambsquarters soup and quiche, sometimes with mushrooms. Although from the looks of this blog, you seem to know your way around greens quite well.

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Hm, quiche. Thanks for the suggestion, tm.

Since people liked the produce pix so much, I thought I'd leave you with a sampling from my archives. These pix are sort of a chronology, starting from October 2007 through late April 2008.

Enjoy and good night.

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Enjoying your blog! All this time I'd been wondering when you might post more again...

Lamb's quarters grow near me, but I usually only use small quantities in miso soup. You can tempura them, dress them with vinegar, dress them "shira-ae" style with tofu/miso/sesame, and so on.

Caraway cheese, must be two decades and counting since I last saw any...

Keep fighting the good fight, you know you're connected through so many people on eGullet with friends and family who've faced the same battle with HIV.

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Yet more beautiful produce! I am just pea green with envy!

:rolleyes:

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Soba! That gorgeous fresh stuff!!! I am just so envious of your being near that market. We went down to our so-called farmers market the other day and there were literally 4 vendors there. Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite places in NYC. My very best friend in the world used to take me there when I visited him - even though he said he only cooked when he got paid for it! Morgan loved me, so he loved watching me enthuse over the produce! I have been enjoying seeing your lovely greens and poached eggs like everyone else. I do mine just like you do and they are one of our favorite things. I hope you'll give us some neighborhood pictures to help me get my NYC fix!!

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And the Rancho Gordo beans are to die for . . . nothing better than beans for breakfast!  :wub:  It is very common in New England, where I grew up, to have baked beans for breakfast.  Now I live in the South, and people think that I'm nuts for asking and you never see beans on breakfast menus!

All you need do to find "beans on breakfast menus" is to go to Latin-themed restaurants. Like you, Hispanics and Latinos love beans for breakfast.

And Soba - I, too, am happy to see you back and blogging. I applaud you for including your physical condition in the discussion, especially since I'm sure that directly impacts upon your food choices.

And getting a bunch of cyberhugs can't hoit.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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[All you need do to find "beans on breakfast menus" is to go to Latin-themed restaurants.  Like you, Hispanics and Latinos love beans for breakfast.

And Soba - I, too, am happy to see you back and blogging.  I applaud you for including your physical condition in the discussion, especially since I'm sure that directly impacts upon your food choices.

And getting a bunch of cyberhugs can't hoit.

I live in a very small town and there are not many breakfast options. Actually, there are not too many options of any kind. We don't even have a diner. :shock: But recently, a small Cuban place opened that supposedly serves breakfast, so I will go and see if I can find beans in the a.m. Typical breakfast fare around here involves eggs, grits, biscuits and gravy, etc. (Not that there is anything wrong with that - it's just not my favorite way to start the day).

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Just got home from Central Park. Breakfast this morning was fresh squeezed orange juice and a buttered bagel from a corner store, sorry no pix.

Here's something to whet your appetite though. Lunch will be served in a bit....

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My spice cabinet

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Left to right: peppermint tea, spice chai tea, orange blossom honey, clam juice, nutmeg, brown mustard seeds, crushed red pepper flakes, black pepper, sesame oil, tamari, allspice, mixed peppercorns, kidney beans, flour...

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...red pepper flakes (I had to buy a new jar), basil, green cardamom pods, kosher salt, rice vinegar, honey, whole cloves, cinnamon sticks, black peppercorns, turmeric, paprika, water-packed tuna, cayenne pepper, bay leaves, cumin.

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Flour, Scottish oats, masoor dal, coconut milk, RG midnight black beans, RG borlotti beans, breadcrumbs, RG rio zape beans, granulated sugar, walnuts, zaatar, golden sultanas, pine nuts, RG cannelini beans, light brown sugar, dark brown sugar, toor dal.

Rancho Gordo's website is here. Not that Beanboy needs any help from me. :raz::wink:

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Arborio rice, kosher salt (I had to buy some recently) and jasmine rice. I must be the only Asian hobbit who doesn't eat rice on a regular basis. :shock: The blue-white box are light bulbs.

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Freezer is a little bare at the moment. Free-range chicken is headed for stock this weekend. Monkfish from Citarella and *shock* organic skinless boneless chicken breasts. :wink: The plastic package on the bottom shelf are some leftover chicken gizzards and parts, also for stock.

More frigo pix coming up later...

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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[All you need do to find "beans on breakfast menus" is to go to Latin-themed restaurants.  Like you, Hispanics and Latinos love beans for breakfast.

And Soba - I, too, am happy to see you back and blogging.  I applaud you for including your physical condition in the discussion, especially since I'm sure that directly impacts upon your food choices.

And getting a bunch of cyberhugs can't hoit.

I live in a very small town and there are not many breakfast options. Actually, there are not too many options of any kind. We don't even have a diner. :shock: But recently, a small Cuban place opened that supposedly serves breakfast, so I will go and see if I can find beans in the a.m. Typical breakfast fare around here involves eggs, grits, biscuits and gravy, etc. (Not that there is anything wrong with that - it's just not my favorite way to start the day).

I don't think I've ever had grits before. Or biscuits and gravy....

Isn't there some coffee dish that involves grits? Red-something.

Thanks for the hugs. :wub:

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I bet you're thinking of grits with red-eye gravy, SobaAddict. Never had it before....but from what I understand, the grits are made in the standard way, and the coffee goes in the gravy made from breakfast meat pan drippings.

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Aaaah!  Rick's Picks!  My favorite.

Soba, great blog so far.  I didn't realize you were a fellow UES'er.  Do you ever eat out in the 'hood?

Cafe D'Alsace a couple of times. Naruto Ramen satisfies my noodle cravings when I don't want to schlep downtown.

There are a couple of Hungarian places in the lower 80s I've been meaning to go to. Is Etats-Unis still good?

Otherwise I'm more of a south-of-23rd Street person. There may be a visit or two later in the week.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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I bet you're thinking of grits with red-eye gravy, SobaAddict. Never had it before....but from what I understand, the grits are made in the standard way, and the coffee goes in the gravy made from breakfast meat pan drippings.

Yeah, that's it.

From what people tell me, grits are sort of like polenta, sort of like cream of wheat. Sounds wonderful in that homey soothing kind of way.

Going to be a light dinner tonight after I get home from the play. :wink: Stay tuned.

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From what people tell me, grits are sort of like polenta, sort of like cream of wheat.  Sounds wonderful in that homey soothing kind of way.

Grits are very smiliar to polenta, except they are made from hominy instead of regular corn. They are supurb with lots of cheddar cheese, garlic, and butter mixed in. YUM!

-Sounds awfully rich!

-It is! That's why I serve it with ice cream to cut the sweetness!

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From what people tell me, grits are sort of like polenta, sort of like cream of wheat.  Sounds wonderful in that homey soothing kind of way.

Grits are very smiliar to polenta, except they are made from hominy instead of regular corn. They are supurb with lots of cheddar cheese, garlic, and butter mixed in. YUM!

The terminology is sometimes a little loose, but technically, hominy grits are made from dried hominy (which is corn treated with lye to remove the hull and the germ). Regular grits are made from dried corn -- just like polenta.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Sometimes simple is best.

I don't mean simple like Rachael Ray. :wink: Simple as in uncomplicated, classical-based cooking using the freshest of ingredients.

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Fromage blanc omelette, salad with an herb viniagrette.

Seven ingredients not counting salt and pepper, ten minutes tops.

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I'm enjoying your food blog! Especially the pictures of the Greenmarket. I am embarrassed to admit that I still haven't been there. Embarrassed especially since I live much closer to it, as I live in the East Village! It's hard to motivate oneself to wake up on Saturdays when the S/O won't wake up! (Ok, well, at least I can't get up myself since my boyfriend doesn't.)

The pictures helped pique his interest though. :smile: It'll have to wait until next week (Brettanomyces beckons!)

I look forward to more posts!

"I know it's the bugs, that's what cheese is. Gone off milk with bugs and mould - that's why it tastes so good. Cows and bugs together have a good deal going down."

- Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry), Chef!

eG Ethics Signatory

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the lambs quarters are great stuffed... in the same manner that you would stuff cabbage or vine leaves... they have a little sourness that really lifts the dish. they can be a bit fiddly to work with when they are small, but they are well worth the effort.

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I'm a little embarrassed to show you the frigo pix because it's what a bachelor pad looks like if my frigo were my apartment.

That being said, I know where everything is. :huh:

Enjoy and good night.

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Natty peanut butter, Thai seasoning paste, champagne currant jelly, capers, asparagus peelings (for stock), lime, Dijon tarragon mustard

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Unsalted butter, fresh chicken eggs from Quattro, tomato bourbon jam, cottage cheese, shallots and garlic. The foil wrapped package is a hunk of ginger root.

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Fromage blanc from Jones Dairy, flowering chives, unsalted butter, salted butter, milk

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Creme fraiche, toasted breadcrumbs, chopped tomatoes, Parmesan cheese, salad greens, spicy mixed olives, curry sauerkraut from Hawthorne Farm, chipotle Tabasco, half an onion in foil, foil-wrapped ramekin filled with anchovies packed in olive oil and salt, leftover caldo verde, leftover black bean soup from Monday, dried shiitake mushrooms (in a container full of water)

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asparagus, broccoli raab, sage, lovage, sucrine, woodsmoked bacon, applewood sausages from Flying Pigs Farm

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lamb's quarters, orange juice, leftover coconut rice (in the stainless steel pot), pickled ginger root

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tri-color penne pasta, red sorrel leaves, fresh tagliatelle, Italian parsley

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crimini mushrooms, celery, cauliflower, heirloom radishes

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cabbage, heirloom potatoes

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yellow onions, gold cippolini onions, red cippolini onions, limes

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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