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Daniel

New Orleans 72hours

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yes Hansen's is on the map.  I grew up in York, PA though and my first job was at the Snow Palace.  It's another shaved ice place with toppings and hundreds of flavors.  I used to run a machine like that.  But if it's hot and we have the time we'll definitely head in that direction!

I initially was going to tell you that Hansen's is only open May through August, but upon double checking, it appears that they've extended their season and are still open. Good luck for you!

...and for me... :biggrin:

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Matt, that looks like a pretty awesome itinerary. The only things I'd suggest would be:

1) like doc said, make sure Chris McMillan is at the bar at the Pere Marquette when you go. It's really worth reorganizing things to be sure to have him make you a drink. The Mint Julep is a thing of rare beauty, and highly recommended, but for your second one, have him make whatever he wants... It's indeed possible that someone else at the bar could make a credible Mint Julep, but I doubt Chris leaves that ice hammer around, and I suspect there's magic in that hammer...

2) If Miss K is into the Pimms Cup, don't miss the Napolean House, but also ask Chris to make one. Totally different drink, but at least as good, maybe better.

3 ) If you're on a Sazerac hunt, you might want to go to Tujack's, just for the sake of honoring the tradition. The one I got there actually wasn't very good, but I liked standing at the bar and holding it.

4) Get at Vieux Carré at the Carousel Bar.

5) Even though I actually did enjoy the experience, I'm still kind of mixed about breakfast at Brennan's. It's a TON of money, and while I liked everything I had, I still wonder whether it was worth it, both in terms of actual expenditure, and in terms of what else I could have had for that meal.

6) We totally dug Parasol, but there are other great Po Boy shops around, so you might want to let geography dictate whether you end up there, or Parkway, Liuzza's, Domilise's, Mother's, Casamento's, etc. Probably worth researching what the house specialty is, or just ask once you get there.

5) At Herbsaint, get something served on dirty rice, or order it as a side. They also make a really nice Sazerac.

6) At Cochon, order everything, or, as close to it as you can manage. I really liked sitting at the kitchen counter and chatting with the chefs.

7) If I were visiting tomorrow, I'd probably go to both Herbsaint and Cochon, but they are owned by the same folks, so you might want to diversify a little!

8) I don't know what it is about Hansen's, I mean, it's just shaved ice... but I too recommend going there... don't forget to get condensed milk as an extra topping.

9) Go to Cafe du Monde. Yeah, it's touristy, yeah it's just donuts and café au lait, but it's pretty great. And open 24 hours, so you don't really have a good excuse.

Have a blast, we expect a full report!


"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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I only have 48 hours!  I'm headed down for a work trip and decided to stay an extra day and a half.

Here's my plan of attack:

etouffe, jambalaya, gumbo, at least two types of po'boy, andouille, blood sausage, muffaletta

You'll have a lot of fun, and the weather is perfect.

Re the blood sausage, I think you mean boudin, which is blood sausage in other parts, but it's a rice dressing made with picnic shoulder, pork liver, onions, etc. It's extremely good, but it's not blood sausage. I don't recall ever seeing real blood sausage in New Orleans, but I never looked for it either.

Have a great time!

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Yes, thanks PopsicleToze! I'd like to find a place to get straight unadulterated boudin. Thanks phila, some of your recs match perfectly with katie's. :D


--

matt o'hara

finding philly

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I don't know of a source for boudin rouge (aka boudin noir) in New Orleans, but Bourgeois' Meat Market in Thibodaux makes it on a regular basis.

Bourgeois Meat Market

543 West Main Street

Thibodaux, LA 70301

(985) 447-7128

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I don't think I saw anyone mention "Lucky Dog", how can you go to the quarter and not hit up the local dog vendor?


Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.

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Chris does not work lunch as the hotel bar is only open in the evenings, if I am not mistaken. Just call the front desk at the Pere Marquette. They should be able to run down the info for you.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Chris does not work lunch as the hotel bar is only open in the evenings, if I am not mistaken. Just call the front desk at the Pere Marquette. They should be able to run down the info for you.

I believe that he is generally there by 5 or 6PM.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Tuesday:

Breakfast: Brennan's

Lunch: Central Market (Muffaletta)

2nd Lunch: Pere Marquette Renaissance Hotel (Mint Julep)

Dinner: Cochon

Cocktails: Carousel Bar

While I liked Cochon, I think it's not as good as Herbsaint (which you also have planned, right?). Since you want to go to the Pere Marquette for a julep, why not go before dinner and eat at Mila? It'll save a lot of travel, as well. And if Chris is at the bar, you'll have better drinks there than at Carousel, which is fun, but doesn't have great cocktails.

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Tuesday:

Breakfast: Brennan's

Lunch: Central Market (Muffaletta)

2nd Lunch: Pere Marquette Renaissance Hotel (Mint Julep)

Dinner: Cochon

Cocktails: Carousel Bar

While I liked Cochon, I think it's not as good as Herbsaint (which you also have planned, right?). Since you want to go to the Pere Marquette for a julep, why not go before dinner and eat at Mila? It'll save a lot of travel, as well. And if Chris is at the bar, you'll have better drinks there than at Carousel, which is fun, but doesn't have great cocktails.

I liked Cochon a lot, but Mila is a rare bird, a truly modern restaurant with a strong sense of terroir. I think Janet's recommendation is a good one. If you prefer the more rustic, you can always do Cochon over Herbsaint. BTW, Cochon has some pretty good cocktails too. The bottom line, is that there is so much good food in New Orleans that it is hard to go wrong within the parameters that you have set.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Thanks phila, some of your recs match perfectly with katie's. :D

Clearly, we've compared notes. But next time we're going to manage to be there at the same time. It'll be epic when that finally happens. :wink:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I liked Cochon a lot, but Mila is a rare bird, a truly modern restaurant with a strong sense of terroir. I think Janet's recommendation is a good one. If you prefer the more rustic, you can always do Cochon over Herbsaint. BTW, Cochon has some pretty good cocktails too. The bottom line, is that there is so much good food in New Orleans that it is hard to go wrong within the parameters that you have set.

I completely agree. MiLa is fantastic. While Cochon and Herbsaint are very good, MiLa takes the cake for me.

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Itinerary updated by recommendations, location and business hours/McMillan hours:

monday

spa day for karen/work stuff for me

lunch for karen? (i'll be at the work thing, hope they feed me)

pimms cup at napoleon house, vacation begins!

mila for apps (no chris on mondays)

vieux carre at carousel bar

jacques-imo for dinner (nobody has mentioned this place, why?)

tuesday

cafe du monde for brekkie

market for muffaletta (for to snack on by the pool)

massage!

mother's po'boy for lunch

pool time!

mint julep at pere marquette (chris!)

cochon for dinner

sazerac at herbsaint

wednesday

breakfast at brennan's (bananas foster)

august for lunch

hansen's!

airport by 3:30PM

so i just have the couple of questions bolded above. and if anybody could point me to a good site that shows local events, points of interest and whatnot that would be cool too. any glaring mistakes here? i thought since we're focusing more on the food here than the tourist experience i could skip the commander's palace, antoine's, galatoire's stuff, but i had to go for the bananas foster breakfast!

::edit::

thanks everybody for experience, recommendations and warnings! if anybody wants to meet out for a drink just holler!


Edited by mattohara (log)

--

matt o'hara

finding philly

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One observation / suggestion. Move Cafe du Monde up one time slot. Yes it is fine for breakfast, but my fondest memories are ending the night at Cafe du Monde.


Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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Matt:

NewOrleansOnline is a very helpful website I've availed myself of many times.

As for the breakfast at Brennan's, I had breakfast there on my last Sunday visiting in July, and while it was good, I'd never bother with it again, or necessarily recommend it to anyone over so many other fantastic places to eat in NOLA. I found that while the restaurant itself is lovely and the service impeccable, watching 18 varieties of Eggs Benedict go by me made me think of the place as an expensive and high class version of IHOP, with nicer surroundings and much better service. The prix fixe brunch is heavy and pricey. I'd never spend $50 for a small appetizer, eggs and dessert again when I could budget that toward so many other more impressive possibilities while in NOLA. And the Bananas Foster are delicious, but also not world changing, at least to me. I don't know. I'm not one with a sweet tooth, and dessert isn't necessarily my favorite course, so perhaps I'm not the best judge, but I've seen things flambeed before and Bananas Foster just isn't that hard to make. I'll bet you could make them at home and use better quality spirits, throw them over some vanilla ice cream (Capogiro gelato, perhaps?) and enjoy it almost as much. YMMV. Perhaps everyone has to do breakfast at Brennan's once to decide if it's worth it to them.

Have a blast! You really must send Chris my best and raise a glass (or ten) in my absence. I'll be thinking of you and Karen jealously next week!


Edited by KatieLoeb (log)

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Agree completely on Brennan's.

Jacques-Imo's just isn't that great. Probably worth looking into something else.

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I was underwhelmed by August. What about Bayona?


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I am a fan of Brennan's and especially of their Eggs Hussard - Canadian bacon and Hollandaise and Marchand de Vin sauces on Holland rusk. It is a great dish.

Breakfast at Brennan's, though indeed expensive, is a New Orleans institution. It is as much a part of New Orleans culinary history as chicory coffee and beignets at Cafe du Monde. Where budget permits, Breakfast at Brennan's should be experienced at least once.


Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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For the Wednesday breakfast, I guess it all depends on what kind of 'experience' you're looking for.

If great local food is what you're after, and you don't care about being in the Quarter or in a Brennan's-esque setting, then I would suggest Elizabeth's in the Bywater which is a short cab ride away. Their praline bacon, boudin balls, and duck hash beat the pants off of Brennan's any day (in my very humble opinion).

Or take the streetcar Uptown to Camillia Grill for a totally different experience, but a great experience nonetheless. An omelette stuffed with cheese, corned beef and french fries served by some of the most enthusiastic waitstaff in the city is not a bad way to start the day.

I agree about Cafe du Monde at night...

For events and music check out The Gambit and La Fete News for the most recent listings.

Have a great trip!


“The secret of good cooking is, first, having a love of it… If you’re convinced that cooking is drudgery, you’re never going to be good at it, and you might as well warm up something frozen.”

~ James Beard

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...great local food is what you're after, and you don't care about being in the Quarter or in a Brennan's-esque setting, then I would suggest Elizabeth's in the Bywater which is a short cab ride away. Their praline bacon, boudin balls, and duck hash beat the pants off of Brennan's any day (in my very humble opinion)...

:blink:

Praline bacon?? Duck hash?? Holy Mother. I know where I'm having breakfast next time I'm in NOLA.

Thanks for that rec Sarabeth. That sounds awesome.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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The last time I was in New Orleans (about a month ago) I read a review (probably in the hotel's "Where" magazine) of Blue Plate Cafe's breakfast. It's been on my list of must try's since then.

I've googled and cannot locate that particular review, but here is one I found online:

From Gambit Weekly

http://www.bestofneworleans.com/dispatch/2.../restreview.php

----------------------------------------------------

What: Blue Plate Cafe

Where: 1330 Prytania St., 309-9500

When: Breakfast and lunch Monday-Saturday

How: Credit Cards

Reservations: Not Accepted

Maybe some of our New Orleans regulars have visited this place.

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