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Foodstuffs in London to bring home?


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isn't seattle the home of good coffee, at least thats the impression i get from frasier!

Thats cos Frasier's never been to The Algerian Coffee Stores !

Gethin

Has anyone tired Cafe Vergnano? They are major fastidious about process, though I believe might be part of an Italian chain. I love the fact they serve the coffee's lukewarm (the milk is perfectly steamed so it doesn't burn and the natural sweetness is maximized). Its the only place I don't add sugar!

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If you decide to go for coffee you might want to check out Monmouth as well. Either Monmouth St in Covent Garden or there's one on Stoney St at Borough Market (which is worth a visit and is next to London Bridge station)

I haven't read the whole thread but you also might want to try Gentleman's Relish (or Patum Peperium). It's probably a bit like Marmite you love it or you hate it - I love it but the posts will probably start rolling in about how revolting it is. Anyway it's made out of anchovies and spices and you have it sparingly on toast. Also if you go to one of the posh department stores for a pot (which is conveniently small by the way) they will have it in ceramic pots with very English scenes printed on them which is a nice souveneir

Edited for spelling

Edited by Romaney O'Malley (log)
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isn't seattle the home of good coffee, at least thats the impression i get from frasier!

Seattle is home to Starbucks, Seattles Best Coffee Company, and many other worldwide chains and roasters. The streets are inundated with mediocre coffee that one wonders if it deserves its reputation. Vancouver is the same, with some areas have 4-5 starbucks within a 2 block radius.

Oh, sure, there's lots of bad and mediocre coffee in Seattle, too many Starbucks cafes, but also some great smalltime roasters:

www.lighthouseroasters.com,

www.caffevita.com,

www.7roasters.com and surely others I'm forgetting at the moment.

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Biscuits and beer, cheese and confections, preserves and tea - oh, my! Going to need another piece of luggage to bring all this home in!

Enjoying all the suggestions. Hmmm.... I'm getting hungry....

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Kendal Mint cake, Lloyd Grossman's Caramelised Onion and Rosemary Chutney (do they still make that?) definitely cheeses from Neal's Yard or Borough Market, but I think soft cheeses are prohibited, clotted cream fudge if you get to Cornwall or Devon.

I may be in Nashville but my heart's in Cornwall

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... but I think soft cheeses are prohibited ... 

I think it would be well worth clarifying exactly what the US Customs (from the previous link) might mean when they say "You may bring bakery items and certain cheeses into the United States." Which cheeses are certain and which un-certain (so to speak) ???

Does it have to do with softness, pasteurisation, or what? (And what proof/documentation might be needed to convince the particular officer that happens to be on duty?) Or is it really about surrender monkeys?

Personally, I find it rather amusing that the restriction to importing some cheeses should actually be under the Bioterrorism Act ... :biggrin:

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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pork pies, although probably not allowed and good piccalilly

The pickle should be fine, but the pork would likely be a problem...

This link was quoted previously on this thread

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/vacation...roductsPrepared

You may bring bakery items and certain cheeses into the United States. The APHIS web site features a Travelers Tips section and Game and Hunting Trophies section that offers extensive information about bringing food and other products into the country. Many prepared foods are admissible. However, almost anything containing meat products, such as bouillon, soup mixes, etc., is not admissible. As a general rule, condiments, vinegars, oils, packaged spices, honey, coffee and tea are admissible. Because rice can often harbor insects, it is best to avoid bringing it into the United States.

Some imported foods are also subject to requirements of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

I do wonder whether they'd even let you through with a packet of Rowntrees Fruit Pastilles (containing gelatine).

And, personally, I couldn't quickly locate any "Travellers Tips" section on http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ ...

Its *not* that there's any lack of good stuff here, the problem is the severe restriction of what the US border guards (and even the state authorities) will let you take *in* over there ...

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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  • 1 month later...
You might want to look at the websites for 2 shops specialising in traditional British foodstuffs.

A Gold  (www.agold.co.uk)  is the better of the two, it's a bit twee but does have some interesting stuff and is also almost next door to Verde's, a grocer/deli/traiteur owned  by Jeannette Winterson (a writer specialising in novels about fruit!) and handy for Spitalfields Market and for Hawksmoor (if you feel the need for a decent steak and a proper cocktail). The website has been somehow aquired by a discount gold jewellry store at the moment , but they are confident of getting it back shortly.

The other shop is The Albion Emporium (its in Covent Garden , so rather more central than A.Gold). Its only been open a matter of days and the stock is still rather limited. their website is www.thealbionemporium.co.uk

Other than those two, Fortnums, Selfridges and the more recently opened John Lewis Foodhall are obvious places to check out.

Pickled walnuts, Frank Cooper's Oxford Marmalade, Bath Olivers, oatcakes,eccles cakes would all be on my list - but obviously cheese, cheese and more cheese should , given the abscence of any edible cheeese at all in the US , be the major focus.

You might also want to try some decent coffee as a  special treat !!  The Algerian Coffee Stores on Old Compton St is the place to go.

gethin

I agree with much of that, but Verde's is possibly the most expensive deli in London and a complete rip-off. Last time I was there they were selling De Cecco pasta for the most ridiculous prices. I don't know how Jeanette can justify it with her thrifty Northern roots.

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