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knblue

Gin and Tonic – Finetuned

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I just posted this 'enhancement' in the Martini thread:

if you are using Hendricks to make your GnT, add a slice of cucumber in place of the lemon/lime - subtle but real nice.

Try it.

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if you are using Hendricks to make your GnT, add a slice of cucumber in place of the lemon/lime - subtle but real nice.

Agreed! The cucumber smooths out the bite of the gin perfectly. Really, anything with Hendrick's is good though.

:D

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When it's really hot (I live in Phoenix AZ, and I've seen the outside temp get to 126°F.) sometimes I make a frozen version. I keep the gin in the freezer, the tonic in the fridge. I put gin in my glass, squeeze in the lemon or lime, add shave-ice from my Hawaiian shave-ice machine then add the tonic water. One day, I'll remember to freeze some tonic in the ice forms for the shave-ice machine....

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A splash of lime cordial. Not enough to make it a full on Gimlet w/Tonic, but just enough to slightly sweeten and tart it up.

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There's a drink that's been on the Violet Hour's menu for a couple seasons now called the Indian Summer (Plymouth, Lime, Lavender Syrup, House-Made Tonic). It is to the G&T what the Cuba Libre is to the Rum & Coke. The flavor is pretty much identical to what I imagine as a perfect G&T. I believe it's the creation of eG-er iraethan.

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A couple of dashes of Peychauds. Or, and this is a Gary Regan invention I believe, a splash or an ounce or two of pink Grapefruit juice in addition to the Peychaud's.

As for the standard G&T, I think you need more lime than just a wedge to balance out the sweetness in the mass market tonics. I also think that the G&T benefits from muddling the lime to get some of the oils expressed -- almost a G&T "a la Mojito", but minus the mint.

Another good addition is Campari, I've found. In fact, one of my favorite summer pitcher drinks involves gin, muddled lime, Bitter Lemon (that bluish stuff that's basically tonic with natural/artificial lemon flavor), and Campari (adjusted to taste).

What can I say, I love me a G&T as well as variations thereon. Don't tend to drink them in the cooler months though.

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I like a dash of grapefruit bitters in mine. Also agree that a little Peychaud's is nice.

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Always heavy on the lime and generous (4 or so) dashes of orange bitters. Sometimes though you have to go straight for the absinthe, and toss in a half-barspoon or so. The more pungent the better.

I have dashed in violet liqueur before as well, but it doesn't work for everyone.

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Looking forward to trying the other variations here too. Thank you!


Edited by Corinna (log)

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A friend introduced me to Tanqueray and Tonic accented with lime, coriander (cilantro) and green chilli. Works really well!

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As an addendum to my post above --

If I'm in the mood for a standard G&T but there's no lime, I'll pass and go for something else. However, Peychaud's seems to make a lime-less G&T not just acceptable but appetizing.

Another addition in the "Italian bitters" category would be Campari's less bitter, more orangey, sweeter in a bubble-gum sort of way, cousin Aperol. I haven't tried it in a standard G&T, probably because I don't often have it around, but IIRC it works well with a gin and bitter lemon.

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Dear me, my very first post is about booze!

When I saw this topic I couldn't resist- last night I had a shiso G+T. Easily available here in Japan, I'm not so sure about other parts of the world. Adds a really pleasant herbal backnote to the drink. No actual leaf in your glass, instead they infuse the gin with 10 leaves or so.

I had this one with lime, but here yuzu is also really popular. Touch on the sweet side for me though.

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but just enough to slightly sweeten and tart it up.

Oh Katie, what a straight line. In the interest of EG decorum I'll defer. But what a golden opportunity.

I like my cocktails like I like my women/men... :biggrin:


Edited by KatieLoeb (log)

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Sometimes I´m doing solid Gin-n-tonic with agar-agar and using some Blue Curaçao for a color impact.

curacao01.jpg

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Meirelles,

That does look rather cool, but do the cubes keep their fizz (an integral part of a G&T for me)

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Meirelles,

That does look rather cool, but do the cubes keep their fizz (an integral part of a G&T for me)

The standard solution to that with G&T cubes is a light sprinkling of citric acid mixed with baking soda. Once it hits the moisture in your mouth, you get a nice fizz.

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That sounds really interesting. Can you share a more detailed explanation/recipe for using citric acid and baking soda in such an application?

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That sounds really interesting. Can you share a more detailed explanation/recipe for using citric acid and baking soda in such an application?

I guess the quickest way for me to answer that would be to point to the recipe at the bottom of this article. Enjoy!

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I'm not greatly fond of lime - it's a bit savage for my palate - but a dribble of my wife's lemon cordial is great. And I third the elderflower suggestions above.

The G&T/Curacao cubes look fabulous!

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Because I can't edit, I would like to mention that I often make my G&T with lemon, with a preference for Meyer lemon, but yuzu is very good -I am still waiting for my yuzu trees to mature so that I can enjoy some fruit! Other than that I cannot get fresh yuzu in the supermarkets in AZ. I pick them up occasionally at trade shows and such.

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My favourite drink over summer (altho', really, is there a bad time for it?) is a gin and tonic. I'm only fairly new to it, tho'. Still trying different gins to see what I like.

When you go out and ask for a g & t you usually end up with something garnished with wedges of lemon or lime. At the moment, it's 40* (C--so over 100-ish for you F people, I think) and I don't feel like driving off to get citrus, so I'm taking my g & t nude. And, sans citrus garnish, it's fine. It's different: the citrus flavour is altogether gone, obviously, and the true flavour of the gin, that medicinal juniper note, is smack bang front and centre. Which I like.

Why is the garnish added? Is it to cut that medicinal flavour, which I can see people not liking (same with all those flavoured vodkas, right?), or is it for looks or for both? Is the drink 'meant' to have a solid citrus note? Aside from lemon and lime and cucumber (seen it done with Hendrick's gin) what else could I (or rather, what else would be a good idea) to experiment with in my g & t?

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Can't help you with different. Lime or lemon work for me, I've never tried anything else in a G&T. I'm not trying to hide anything though, I like gin sans garnish or tonic.

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