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Pimlico


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Alex James (farmer, rocker), who quite plausibly stands in for AA Gill in the ST from time to time, described the wedge of paper you use to stop a table rocking on an uneven floor as a 'pimlico', last Sunday.

I don't know about you but I've never heard this in a long life of sitting at wobbly tables. Could it be that he is using his ST piece to 'seed' this new usage, with the intention of being able to claim that he invented it, once it becomes universal?

Or not?

Edited by Chaihana Joe (log)
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Yes and no...

There is apparently a word for the wad of paper/card used to prop up a wobbly leg, but it seems it is referred to as a "ludlow". Shaun would be proud...

I think Alex may possibly have been guilty of a bit of lazy jouralistic research (if you're going to web-trawl then at least do it properly).

If you Google "wobbly table pimlico" (sans inverted commas) and look at the brief description of the seventh result down - headed "Culture: New Words" - it may, on quick skimming, lead one to confuse a pimlico with a ludlow.

Click on the result though and it is apparent that a "pimlico" is a "small, odd-shaped piece of plastic or curious metal component found in the bottom of kitchen rummage-drawer when spring-cleaning or looking for Sellotape."

No more journalism for you Mr James, it's back to Brit-rock and/or farming.

Cheers

Thom

It's all true... I admit to being the MD of Holden Media, organisers of the Northern Restaurant and Bar exhibition, the Northern Hospitality Awards and other Northern based events too numerous to mention.

I don't post here as frequently as I once did, but to hear me regularly rambling on about bollocks - much of it food and restaurant-related - in a bite-size fashion then add me on twitter as "thomhetheringto".

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As mentioned, according to "The Meaning of Liff"

PIMLICO (n.)

Small odd-shaped piece of plastic or curious metal component found in the bottom of kitchen rummage drawer when spring-cleaning or looking for Sellotape.

http://folk.uio.no/alied/TMoL.html#anchorP

I guess a pimlico could be used for this end. It might be its only useful function.

---

It's been ages since I've seen this. Shoeburyness has always been a favourite (my English grandmother lived there). But there are some lovely treasures, such as

SHANKLIN (n.)

The hoop of skin around a single slice of salami.

(which can now be updated to include chorizo)

and

HENSTRIDGE (n.)

The dried yellow substance found between the prongs of forks in restaurants.

Edited by MoGa (log)
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I think Alex may possibly have been guilty of a bit of lazy jouralistic research (if you're going to web-trawl then at least do it properly).

Yes, a ludlow. It really has the right ring to it. Surprising, almost that it didn't catch on when it was first aired, what 20 years ago.

Well, I'm going to use it from now on!

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Yes, a ludlow. It really has the right ring to it. Surprising, almost that it didn't catch on when it was first aired, what 20 years ago.

Not aired, published:

The Meaning of Liff - Douglas Adams and John Lloyd - 1984

The full list of words.

I still have my dog-eared copy of The Meaning of Liff which made me laugh hugely as a young boy (ok, ok, it still does). Funny who these things come back around again - a friend recently showed me a book of humourous letters which was a straight rip-off of the Henry Root letters but gave them no credit whatsoever as inspiration!

I was always mightily proud that my hometown of that time (and this), Glossop, actually got an entry in The Meaning of Liff. I can't remember the exact wording of the definition but fittingly a "glossop" was a hot globule of food which adhered to one's lip when trying to eat politely.

Edited to correct - a "glossop" actually falls onto your host's expensively laquered table rather than adhering to one's lip.

Cheers

Thom

Edited by thom (log)

It's all true... I admit to being the MD of Holden Media, organisers of the Northern Restaurant and Bar exhibition, the Northern Hospitality Awards and other Northern based events too numerous to mention.

I don't post here as frequently as I once did, but to hear me regularly rambling on about bollocks - much of it food and restaurant-related - in a bite-size fashion then add me on twitter as "thomhetheringto".

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I think Alex may possibly have been guilty of a bit of lazy jouralistic research (if you're going to web-trawl then at least do it properly).

Very true Thom. In fact I am really surprised how this individual has managed to be allowed to have such a high profile with regards to food writing. Firstly he knows next to nothing about food and secondly he knows next to nothing about food writing. Constant references to the popular music combo he used to be a part of is so boring and his inane repetition of the word cheese, which he somehow thinks warrants him as expert. And he was a 'judge' in the OFM awards, come on how can someone who probably never ate for how many years suddenly be deemed a suitable judge of anything food related.

In comparison to some of the great writers on this board who are really into the subject, its a real shame that I can't be reading their work in my monthly OFM. As it is I usually end up ripping out page two folding it in a tiny square and using it as a 'ludlow'.

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[ And he was a 'judge' in the OFM awards, come on how can someone who probably never ate for how many years suddenly be deemed a suitable judge of anything food related.

Having met Alex recently, I have to say that his passion for food can't be doubted.

His Cheese "Little Wallop " made for him by white lake cheeses in Shepton Mallet is actually well received at our place, and sells well in the deli.

I couldn't comment on his food knowledge for OFM, but he knew what he was talking about when I was chatting to him after his meal. He is very good at PR too, better than that actually, brilliant at PR.......(I wish I had his golden touch..)

http://www.allium.uk.net

http://alliumfood.wordpress.com/ the alliumfood blog

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming - Whey hey what a ride!!!, "

Sarah Poli, Firenze, Kibworth Beauchamp

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In comparison to some of the great writers on this board who are really into the subject, its a real shame that I can't be reading their work in my monthly OFM. As it is I usually end up ripping out page two folding it in a tiny square and using it as a 'ludlow'.

Yes, indeed, the writers on this board, who spend all their time bitching at each other (like I am now in fact) about who has superior knowledge, have a greater right to comment on food-related matters than an admittedly interesting washed up posh pop star who makes cheese, but seems genuinely enthused by it, and in my view transmits that enthusiasm well on the page.

Bet he doesn't know what Elvers are though. Bastard.

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OK. Call me a priss but there's something truly horrible about the waitron, hockling around down there in all the muck and oomska, jury-rigging the bloody furniture with scraps of paper. It gives me the dry heaves.

I have a similar thing with napkin arrangers... 'GET YOUR F%$£ING HANDS OUT OF MY LAP'.

White rubber window wedges, bought in bulk packets of twenty. I keep one clipped to my keyring and leave it in the restaurant when I leave for extra karma points.

Tim Hayward

"Anyone who wants to write about food would do well to stay away from

similes and metaphors, because if you're not careful, expressions like

'light as a feather' make their way into your sentences and then where are you?"

Nora Ephron

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couldn't comment on his food knowledge for OFM, but he knew what he was talking about when I was chatting to him after his meal. He is very good at PR too, better than that actually, brilliant at PR.......(I wish I had his golden touch..)

No doubt he has the gift of self publicity. Thankfully his knowledge and grasp on food and food writing couldn't be any worse than his knowledge and grasp on politics, as his legendary appearance on Question Time testified :biggrin:

What next Jay Rayner replacing the late John Entwistle on bass for The Who??? :wacko:

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It seems mad to me to say that because he used to be a pop-star he can't know anything about food.

Also can't fully understand the logic of- he was poor on question time therefore can't know anything about food.

I find it unlikely that previously "he never ate".

Good PR is not a crime, and presumably he does know something about food-writing, what with him being paid for it unlike most of us.

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It seems mad to me to say that because he used to be a pop-star he can't know anything about food.

Also can't fully understand the logic of- he was poor on question time therefore can't know anything about food.

I find it unlikely that previously "he never ate".

Good PR is not a crime, and presumably he does know something about food-writing, what with him being paid for it unlike most of us.

I think he's admirably qualified. He went to my old school. :laugh:

Other significant alumni are, apparently, Christian Bale and Benny Hill.

Tim Hayward

"Anyone who wants to write about food would do well to stay away from

similes and metaphors, because if you're not careful, expressions like

'light as a feather' make their way into your sentences and then where are you?"

Nora Ephron

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on the rock star as foodie tack has anyone read alex from franz ferdinand's book of foodie reminisces on tour?

Yes and the bastard can write as well as play the guitar - very good indeed. The pieces were originally in the Guardian on a Friday (and commissioned I believe by Helen who posts here) and so may be available online. He worked in kitchens before becoming a rock star.

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