Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cooking with tarragon


TAPrice
 Share

Recommended Posts

Today at the farmer's market, I bought a fistful of the most fragrant tarragon I've ever encountered. Tonight, I chopped a little and sprinkled it over some fresh black drum that I also got at the market. Very nice.

But now I'm still got lots of tarragon and wondering how to do this bunch of herbs justice before it goes bad. Any suggestions for a dish that uses a lot of tarragon?

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, tarragon is my "special secret" to my bolognaise sauce. I even start with :blush: a jar of sauce (usually Prego with mushrooms), a pound of hamburger, a pound of Italian sweet sausage out of the casings, a bunch of chopped onion, fresh mushrooms if I have them, and the tarragon. Brown the meats together, pour off most of the fat, add the onions and saute until softened. Dump in the jar of sauce, the sliced mushrooms, some (a small can) of tomato paste, a small can of tomato sauce, some canned diced tomatoes (no juice) and a bunch of tarragon, about a Tbsp. ( I usually use dried and scrunch it in the palm of my hand.) Let the sauce simmer for about an hour, then turn off, move to a cold burner and cover. When you come home from the bar, start the water for the pasta, put a bunch of basil in the sauce ( dried basil, or julliened fresh) and bring up to serving temp. Oh, yeah, a BUNCH of garlic, run thru a press in the first batch of stuff, too. If you don't want to press the garlic mince it, fine, fine, fine, or run it by your Microplane. You're the first person I've ever given this recipe to: feel honored! ( I never claimed this is Italian, but every one loves it, even the cats!) A Tbsp. of dried tarragon is about equal to a scant quarter cup of fresh...

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today at the farmer's market, I bought a fistful of the most fragrant tarragon I've ever encountered. Tonight, I chopped a little and sprinkled it over some fresh black drum that I also got at the market. Very nice.

But now I'm still got lots of tarragon and wondering how to do this bunch of herbs justice before it goes bad. Any suggestions for a dish that uses a lot of tarragon?

You could make bernaise sauce for a surf and turf dinner.

I also use tarragon to make chicken stock. Make a multiple-quart batch, then freeze it.

Enjoy.

Motochef!

Motochef! Enjoying fine food while motorcycle touring.

Motoblog! Motochef's Notes, Comments and Points of Interest

Motochef!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Green beans with bacon and tarragon.

French and blanch the beans. Add to a pan with hot bacon bits. Mix with tarragon vinegar and fresh tarragon.

Everyone got to pick a favourite dish that we would have at special meals, this was always my sister's pick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the leaves are not too big , I would use them in a salad with grapes (red or green), toasted pine nuts, caramelized shallots, red wine vinegar and a nice olive oil, maybe a bit of parsley to cut it. I know it sounds intense but the balance achieved with the sweet grapes, nuts and vinegar is really good. Not something you eat a large bowl of but as a refreshing starter or a side to a nice roasted bird (quail, duck or chicken).

Also use it in a sauce for roast or sautéed chicken. Reduce brown chicken stock down to a 1/3 or 1/4 of it's volume with some herbs and chopped shallots, strain, reduce heat and add a nice spoonful of Dijon mustard, then a touch of cream and then whisk in butter a small cube at a time until incorporated and emulsified , stop when your sauce has a nice velvety texture or your conscience can't handle anymore. Season and then add tarragon leaves and leave to infuse over the lowest heat setting, then serve with your chicken or bird of choice.

Cricklewood

Link to comment
Share on other sites

See my post about Summer Menus from yesterday in this forum. A good handful of tarragon in the fish stew really goes well.

Another good use is in a chicken dish. Brown some chicken pieces (leg, thigh, breast) then add S&P plus herbs de province. Bake until just cooked through. Take them out of the oven & pour off most of the fat from the roasting pan.

Now add lots of chopped mushrooms (I prefer a mix of wild & white) to the pan & fry until just softened, then add lots of cream. Reduce just a bit then add lots of chopped tarragon. Serve immediately as a sauce over the chicken pieces.

Did this recently at a dinner party & got 14 rave reviews. People loved the tarragon although many couldn't figure out what it was that gave the sauce that terrific flavor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

added to coleslaw (cabbage, carrots) when a client revealed an onion allergy. So, coleslaw was flavored w/ italian parsley, tarragon and cilantro.

Karen Dar Woon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tarragon is great with pretty much all shellfish, particularly prawns, lobster, crab and scallos. Whether you make a tarragon butter sauce or add it to a more creamy thermidor type sauce you are on to a winner - that anise flavour really brings out the fresh, sweet taste of it.

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used tarragon in my French-style potato salad. New potatoes with a vinaigrette of white wine or champagne vineger, olive oil, dijon mustard, shallots and as much tarragon as you like. Salt and pepper, of course. Served warm or room temp, it's great.

I do a similar potato salad, only with chives and parsley and little or no mustard.

I also make an herb omelet with using a similar herb mixture, adding the eggs to a pan in which minced shallots are simmering. Finishing with a little Gruyere or Cheddar in the middle is not a bad idea, either.

Also works most excellently in a chicken salad.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another good use is in a chicken dish. Brown some chicken pieces (leg, thigh, breast) then add S&P plus herbs de province. Bake until just cooked through. Take them out of the oven & pour off most of the fat from the roasting pan.

Now add lots of chopped mushrooms (I prefer a mix of wild & white) to the pan & fry until just softened, then add lots of cream. Reduce just a bit then add lots of chopped tarragon. Serve immediately as a sauce over the chicken pieces.

I do a variation of this as a saute.

Season the chicken pieces with S&P and brown in butter with a little olive oil - I usually use thighs and/or legs. I like the skin, so I make sure it is well browned and crispy :raz:

Reduce the heat, add some tarragon (the stalks are good here) and cover to cook the chicken through, skin side up.

When the chicken is cooked, remove and keep warm. Discard the tarragon and pour off any excess oil.

Deglaze with white wine/vermouth and add some chopped tarragon leaves.

Reduce and add creme fraiche (or regular cream, finishing with a squeeze of lemon) and return the chicken to the pan.

It's based on a Nigel Slater recipe and is both simple and delicious!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I continue to follow this thread I am reminded of a cold salad I was enamored of for some time made by Trader Joe's (a Southern California specialty grocery). It was angel hair pasta, shredded chicken thigh meat, diced artichoke hearts, a ton of tarragon and a light dressing. Addictive. I need to revisit the flavor elements since artichokes are plentiful and come up with my own version.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By ojisan
      Does anyone have any thoughts about Alice Waters' new "40 Years of Chez Panisse"? Not a recipe cookbook - more of a memoir/history/picture book.
    • By Rushina
      What would you like to be included in a cookbook you classify as a "good cookbook"?
      Rushina
    • By Multiwagon
      Other than the three written by Michael Ruhlman, which I have read and loved, what other books are out there that are about cooking, but not cookbooks?
    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...