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New York Strip Roast


HawkeyeFoodie
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Sometimes my local butcher runs a great special on whole new york strip roasts (10-12lbs). I'm going to the Indy 500 and am in charge of cooking for about 15 other people. I'm thinking of trimming a bit of the fat off of the top and cooking the New York like a roast on a propane grill. I haven't found too many recipes which cook a New York whole so is this a bad idea? Has anyone done this before? Also, I would love any great idea for "tailgating" food that is a step up from burgers, brats, ribs, etc.

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ive cooked whole NY strips more than once with great results. i sear it well on the grill, then rake the coals to both sides and roast it covered till the center is about 110 degrees, but i like my beef quite rare.

I slice it very thin for sandwiches, and it makes great party food

good luck

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This cut is technically called a boneless shell roast or, alternatively, a strip-loin roast. New York strip only refers, as far as I know, to individual steaks cut from the strip loin.

When I was trailing in the kitchen at Gramercy Tavern, we cooked a shell roast for a private party. Just seared it in a shallow rondeau-type pot and then roasted it in the oven. It was great.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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With less fat surrounding the meat, this roast is not as forgiving as a rib roast to over cooking. Be sure to cook for rare and let rest to achieve the correct temperature. If done correctly, it can be a very good roast, if not, it can end up as anu overcooked hunk of meat, suitable for BBQ sauce.-Dick

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Well - not sure about what you guys are on about - I order from a very reputable fine meat and seafood guy here and when I get the box it always says NY Strip Roast on the side of the box.

We do them all of the time - I trim to fat until it is not a hard push. We use a dry rub - 350 for - well until it is done. We sue them on carving stations - and I use them for sandwiches and soups (left over cuts of course) They are no trouble and easy. The cost is also a bit better. Tenderloin is costing me about 10$/# and Strip is costing me about 6.50 - so it is a good thing as far as I am concerned and very easy

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I've never done it on an outdoor grill, but I certainly have roasted them in the oven the same as a Rib Roast, and they work great.

My butcher insisted on wanting to hack partway through the "chine bone" (I think it is) but I thought that was an abomination, so I didn't let him. I roasted it whole, and then after it rested, I used a long smoked-salmon slicing knife to scoop the entire piece of meat off the bone before carving, and it worked great as well.

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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Hi,

I also have excellent luck with NY strip roast, usually using the same method that I use for a rib roast. Sear on all sides and finish at a very low temperature to your desired temperature.

This works in an oven or in a kettle with lump charcoal. With lump charcoal, I use a fire brick dam (a homemade Smokinator) with the lump against the kettle wall. This provides high heat for the sear on both sides. The roast then goes onto the cool side of the grill. I place some wood and a water pan on top of the coals to moderates heat, provide smoke and humidity. It is easy to hold the temp to below 275 in the kettle. A probe alerts me when the temp gets to 115 degrees.

Pay attention to the temp of the cooking chamber and the temp of the meat and you cannot miss.

Tim

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Just doing a little reading in the IMPS guidelines, and I believe what we're talking about is number 180, "Strip Loin, Boneless."

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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