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"Pure Orange Oil"


chappie
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Waiting in a doctor's office this morning during my wife's appointment, I started thumbing through the (mostly women's and lifestyle) magazines. One of them featured a blurb about Padma Lakshmi, and I was surprised to find a handful of compelling recipes I immediately began to transcribe: Black Grapes & Baby Arugula; Carrot & Cilantro Salad; Sauteed Sweet Potato & Limas; Basil & Blood Orange Salad; and Pondicherry Lentil Salad.

A few of these call for "Pure Orange Oil," with fresh grated zest as a substitute.

I've never used this. Where do I find it, and are there varying qualities? It sounds like you only use a tiny bit -- a drop or two -- to flavor a dressing or dish.

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Waiting in a doctor's office this morning during my wife's appointment, I started thumbing through the (mostly women's and lifestyle) magazines. One of them featured a blurb about Padma Lakshmi, and I was surprised to find a handful of compelling recipes I immediately began to transcribe: Black Grapes & Baby Arugula; Carrot & Cilantro Salad; Sauteed Sweet Potato & Limas; Basil & Blood Orange Salad; and Pondicherry Lentil Salad.

A few of these call for "Pure Orange Oil," with fresh grated zest as a substitute.

I've never used this. Where do I find it, and are there varying qualities? It sounds like you only use a tiny bit -- a drop or two -- to flavor a dressing or dish.

You can sometimes find it in pharmacies, or look for Boyajian oils.

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Waiting in a doctor's office this morning during my wife's appointment, I started thumbing through the (mostly women's and lifestyle) magazines. One of them featured a blurb about Padma Lakshmi, and I was surprised to find a handful of compelling recipes I immediately began to transcribe: Black Grapes & Baby Arugula; Carrot & Cilantro Salad; Sauteed Sweet Potato & Limas; Basil & Blood Orange Salad; and Pondicherry Lentil Salad.

A few of these call for "Pure Orange Oil," with fresh grated zest as a substitute.

I've never used this. Where do I find it, and are there varying qualities? It sounds like you only use a tiny bit -- a drop or two -- to flavor a dressing or dish.

I found this: http://www.eastherb.com/orange-oil/now-foods/p24545.html, and this one too, http://www.greenfeet.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=8501%2D01051%2D0000 that has 4 different citrus oils plus a lemongrass oil. The recipes you mentioned, except the last one, didn't particularly sound Punjabi, but the article seems to be.

John S.

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I found this website recently, although I haven't bought anything from it. It lists 3 different kinds of orange oil; also many other food-quality essential oils: http://aftelier.com/store/index.php?main_p...fedd4285afeaad8

The owner Mandy Aftel is coauthor of the cookbook Aroma. http://www.amazon.com/Aroma-Magic-Essentia...09446182&sr=8-4

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Use this stuff sparingly....despite the fact that it is a natural product, it is really strong and if you use too much your food will taste like orange-scent Mr. Clean floorcleaner. It also can eat through styrofoam and thin plastics.

If only I'd worn looser pants....

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Use this stuff sparingly....despite the fact that it is a natural product, it is really strong and if you use too much your food will taste like orange-scent Mr. Clean floorcleaner.  It also can eat through styrofoam and thin plastics.

Agreed. I use Boyajian, as mentioned above (also their lemon and lime oils). Depending on the size of the recipe (I haven't seen any of Lakshmi's), even a quarter-teaspoon can be sufficient, or even overwhelm.

I like adding a little orange oil to my chocolate chunk cookies.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Use this stuff sparingly....despite the fact that it is a natural product, it is really strong and if you use too much your food will taste like orange-scent Mr. Clean floorcleaner.  It also can eat through styrofoam and thin plastics.

Agreed. I use Boyajian, as mentioned above (also their lemon and lime oils). Depending on the size of the recipe (I haven't seen any of Lakshmi's), even a quarter-teaspoon can be sufficient, or even overwhelm.

I like adding a little orange oil to my chocolate chunk cookies.

The Baker's Catalogue/King Arthur Flour sells the Boyajian citrus oils, and can advise you as to amounts to use. Sometimes I use an eye dropper to measure; 12 drops are roughly equivalent to 1 teaspoon grated zest.

And, yes, there ARE very effective citrus oil-based cleaning products!

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