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Listening to Sounds in Cooking


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The sound of the cracks is very important in coffee roasting. The coffee goes through 'first crack' and then 'second crack', and this has implications for the level of roast. I generally roast my coffee a few seconds into second crack, so when I hear that, I know it is time to stop the roast and cool the batch.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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This is spot on. I can listen to my quickbread and cake batters and know if they are done even before testing with a toothpick

I listen to stove top items all the time - the sizzle of a saute pan, the plop, plop of a boiling or simmering pot and many others mentioned above.

Question though - Can you hear your baking goods making a noise through the oven wall?

Life is short, eat dessert first

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Question though - Can you hear your baking goods making a noise through the oven wall?

No, I wish. :laugh:

The crackling batter test (sound of the batter cooking) is probably the first thing I notice when pulling cakes and quickbreads from the oven, then I check to see if the batter is still jiggling. On some rare occasions, I also press down on the batter. The toothpick check is the last check I do, if I think the batter is ready.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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I would agree about the sound of rice cooking. For me, it's when I hear a slight sizzle, it means my rice is done and has developed a nice brown crust.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

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The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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:cool:

I cook rice by ear: as liquid is absorbed, the burbling turns to hissing, and then, juuuuust before silence, it's time to uncover, and stir/fluff, and serve.

(The above doesn't apply to risotto, when I want and need the entire symphony of sight/sound/taste/touch/smell.  There have been evenings when I almost had more fun cooking the stuff than eating.  Almost, I said.)

:cool:

Yes...with risotto, there's a certain crackling-type sound when the rice is ready for the first addition of liquid (usually white wine).

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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I seem to cook my rice (generally Japanese) a little differently to others on here.

I use two hobs, the largest and the smallest. The largest I whack up to ful power, the smallest to the minimum setting.

I put a pan with rice and water with a heavy lid on the maximum heat setting and listen out for the pot to get to a rolling boil. Without peaking I switch the pan over to the smaller hob.

I'm afraid I don't listen to the rice after that, I just set a timer for ten minutes, relax/do something else, then turn the heat off, quickly switch the lid for a moist kitchen towel and wait for another ten minutes.

---

I use sound to select water melons (as my Spanish grandfather taught me, he never picked one unless it was perfectly ripe). No need to press the melon or damage it in any way. Give it a slap (as if it was a buttock) and the sound should be hollow, although I'm not sure if that's the best way to describe it (it needs to 'reverberate' a little too).

Edited by MoGa (log)
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Risotto also tells you when it's done.

Could you try to describe that? I've always relied on the tooth test for doneness.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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I was making dinner today, and it occurred to me that one of the best sounds in the world is the hiss from a pile of sliced onions sliding into a hot frying pan foaming with butter.

What are some of your favourite kitchen sounds?

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I love the "crunch" of scallions under a razor sharp knife.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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