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jewish restaurant recommendations in london


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hi there

I have a jewish friend coming into london and he asked me to find a restaurant to go to for passover meal?

I had a dig on london eating for jewish restaurant but all the reviews seem to be pretty old.

Can anyone recommend me a restaurant to take him to?

thanks in advanced

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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hi there

I have a jewish friend coming into london and he asked me to find a restaurant to go to for passover meal?

I had a dig on london eating for jewish restaurant but all the reviews seem to be pretty old. 

Can anyone recommend me a restaurant to take him to?

thanks in advanced

huh? surely all the restaurants will be closed for the seder, it being friday an shabbat an all that??

More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!
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hi there

I have a jewish friend coming into london and he asked me to find a restaurant to go to for passover meal?

I had a dig on london eating for jewish restaurant but all the reviews seem to be pretty old. 

Can anyone recommend me a restaurant to take him to?

thanks in advanced

huh? surely all the restaurants will be closed for the seder, it being friday an shabbat an all that??

hi jon

how you been?

i have absolutely no idea on jewish customs.

i think its saturday night that they can stop fasting.

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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To be honest, as Jay demonstrated by a relatively recent review of a restaurant in Golders Green, Kosher restaurants and good eating don;t often mix. In central London, tow worth trying are Reubens (fantstic salt beef!) and six-13 which is in a converted synagogue. Otherwise take a trip to Golder's Green and take your pick - it is all pretty hit and miss, but sadly, unlike in the USA, it seems people are happy to pay high prices for poor kosher food!

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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To be honest, as Jay demonstrated by a relatively recent review of a restaurant in Golders Green, Kosher restaurants and good eating don;t often mix.  In central London, tow worth trying are Reubens (fantstic salt beef!) and six-13 which is in a converted synagogue.  Otherwise take a trip to Golder's Green and take your pick - it is all pretty hit and miss, but sadly, unlike in the USA, it seems people are happy to pay high prices for poor kosher food!

hi ravelda

I got that impression to from reading the scant restaruant reviews available.

I will have a look at Reubens. thanks :smile:

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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To be honest, as Jay demonstrated by a relatively recent review of a restaurant in Golders Green, Kosher restaurants and good eating don;t often mix.  In central London, tow worth trying are Reubens (fantstic salt beef!) and six-13 which is in a converted synagogue.  Otherwise take a trip to Golder's Green and take your pick - it is all pretty hit and miss, but sadly, unlike in the USA, it seems people are happy to pay high prices for poor kosher food!

Unfortunately I can echo your comments about the general quality of Kosher food here.

Six-13 has gone bust - the only "high end" Kosher restaurant in London is now Bevis Marks, where the food varies from mediocre to quite poor. Now it has no competition in the City, things can only get worse...

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To be honest, as Jay demonstrated by a relatively recent review of a restaurant in Golders Green, Kosher restaurants and good eating don;t often mix.  In central London, tow worth trying are Reubens (fantstic salt beef!) and six-13 which is in a converted synagogue.  Otherwise take a trip to Golder's Green and take your pick - it is all pretty hit and miss, but sadly, unlike in the USA, it seems people are happy to pay high prices for poor kosher food!

Unfortunately I can echo your comments about the general quality of Kosher food here.

Six-13 has gone bust - the only "high end" Kosher restaurant in London is now Bevis Marks, where the food varies from mediocre to quite poor. Now it has no competition in the City, things can only get worse...

Wow - I didn't know Six-13 had gone under! Can't say I'm too surprised though - the food was pretty poor and at the prices they charge you could go for a fab meal elsewhere (albeit not Kosher). To be honest, in my opinion if you want an edible kosher meal it is best to steer away from kosher attempts at fine dining in the UK and sticking to more casual fare - less room for it being disgusting!

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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As the recommendations in this thread are so grim, I wondered if this post would help

In response to a vegan visitor.

I realise there are certain vegan foods that should not be eaten at passover, but a phone call to this restaurant might find that they can accommodate these requirements.

There are other longer established Saf restaurants around which have links in this page

http://www.thelifeco.com/safrestoran.aspx

These websites show sample menus which give a good idea as to what they have available.

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Go to a local synagogue.

They may well have a communal Seder, especially the Reform Synagogues, or if not a family will offer hospitality to "the stranger within thy gates".

I think a lot of restaurants will be closed this week because its a major pain in the ass to clean out all the 'chametz' (remaining bread, any leavened foodstuff), and without doing this, it is impossible to remain open. In Jewish tradition, a Jew will sell all their leavened products to a non-Jew, albeit temporarily, and this usually includes restaurants which are thus closed.

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