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lucas thomas

Chef visits Rome for the first time

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I'm on parole for four days in Rome. I'll try to cadge restaurant names off the boards and rely on pluck for the rest. I am looking for exceptional food locations in the area-I even have two days entirely to myself. Whether it be bread, charcuterie, supplies, etc., I'd love to have some addresses that inspire. Thank you.

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Volpetti is arguably the best food store in Rome. Outstanding selections of cheeses, salumi, etc. Take the Metro to Piramide and walk west for a few blocks on Via Marmoratta. Its right there.

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Thank you, Dale. Might you have ideas for suppy stores?

Volpetti is arguably the best food store in Rome.  Outstanding selections of cheeses, salumi, etc.  Take the Metro to Piramide and walk west for a few blocks on Via Marmoratta.  Its right there.

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Thank you for the link. It is outstanding to see the flurry of passion regarding Rome. If only it were the case for where I live in Switzerland...

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I'm on parole for four days in Rome.  I'll try to cadge restaurant names off the boards and rely on pluck for the rest.  I am looking for exceptional food locations in the area-I even have two days entirely to myself.  Whether it be bread, charcuterie, supplies, etc., I'd love to have some addresses that inspire.  Thank you.

For supplies, Tervi, near San Giovanni, and mentioned elsewhere, is very well organized and good for professional stuff, especially for sweets and ice cream.

A hole in the wall professional supply shop is Metalcristal, via S. Martino ai Monti 24.

Peroni (www.peronisnc.it), mentioned in the other thread, is near a very nice municipal market and the Franchi tavola calda and shop (www.franchi.it), via Cola di Rienzo 204, which I heartily recommend. Castroni, next door, is worth a walk through but fails to excite me. It's mainly useful for residents (which I am) to find ingredients when they want to make something non-Italian once in a while. But their coffee is very good.

For shopping, in addition to Volpetti (which I love and where I shop all the time), there is La Tradizione, at Via Cipro 8e, right across from the Cipro metro station on line A. Also near there, have a slice of pizza al taglio (a VERY Roman thing) at Pizzarium at via della Meloria 43.

There are good shops on and around piazza Campo de' Fiori, though the neighborhood and market are quite overrun with tourists.


Maureen B. Fant
www.maureenbfant.com

www.elifanttours.com

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I wouldn't miss Volpetti, located at Via Marmorata 47, between Via A.Volta & Via Aldo Manunzio. Nor would I miss lunch or dinner at La Piazzetta, vicolo del Buon Consiglio 23a, 06 6991640, a short walk from the Forum. I first read about it in a NYT article by Ms. Fant about 5 years, and it's become our favorite restaurant in Rome.

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I went to the restaurant "Al MORO" ( The Moor - as in N. African) about 6 years ago and always wanted to go back. The artichokes I still remember well. I found a recent review of it on an Italian web page : Address is : ROMA (RM) Vicolo delle Bollette, 13 (Centro storico) Tel 066783495

The Italian reviewer writes :

Cost : 45 a 65 euro per head. 90 places. The Trattoria "Al Moro" is a classic trattoria in full Roman style- characteristic and comfortable. The cuisine has maintained the quality of the ingredients and the love of traditional cooking both Roman and Italian. They serve meat, fresh fish and offer a well-stocked and carefully selected cellar.

Buon appetito !

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Just got back yesterday from Rome. Discovered Gusto - a complex containing restaurant, pizzeria, wine bar, cheese shop, sandwich shop, kitchen store. I dined at Osteria Della Frezza. It is part of the Gusto mini empire. Location is Via Della Frezza, 13.

Here is the website: Gusto

Osteria Della Frezza serves a fine selection of cheeses and honey, starting with the milder, softer cheeses to the harder ones. Good way to sample eight to ten different types of cheeses without having to buy it at the cheese shop. Also, served a nice sampling of salumi - proscuitto, etc.


Edited by cwyc (log)

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