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eG foodblog: Kim Shook - Dreams of an Everyday Housewife


Kim Shook
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And, ummmmm, err......Kim and Susan , granny chains are the way to go.  I have a pair of readers in my purse and one in my kitchen.  Both attached to granny chains.  Only way to keep track of 'em.  The ones in the purse make field trips to work, hence the need for the leash.

pierogi, susan and kim~

this is the eye doc speaking. Multifocal CONTACTS are the way to go ! No dropping your glasses in the soup and on the floor. No steaming up. :wink:

Kim, I am loving your blog. I have a Jessica prolly about the same age (23). I think it was a good year for Jessicas. LOL.

I hope you are feeling OK and not up all night. I look forward to reading more in the AM ! (Otis is counting on you :rolleyes: )

Kathy

Except for those of us who can't wear multifocal contacts. :sad: Kim, I'm loving your blog. I hope you're feeling better this morning!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Good Morning!! Your dinner looks like Heaven on big white shiny plates. And the candlegleam through the iced tea (G.R.I.T.S. all the way---iced tea on the table, wine notwithstanding).

I hope you're feeling better; mint on any kind of meat would send me to the showers---Chris did a little rack of lamb on the grill last night---I marinated it in a couple of tablespoons of the secret marinade he makes when he's doing tenderloins. We keep a little jug in the freezer, and just pour out a bit---it never gets quite solid. THEN when he brought it in, it was slick and shiny with some Baby Ray's Honey sauce.

AND the fork-bite he proffered to me had a little snick of pale green mint jelly just behind it. I backed off, and he cut another bite, but I could still taste it from its touch to the fork tines. It was just creamy-tender, and very un-lamby---no taste of the game.

WOIOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO did you FEEL that???

We had one tremor this a.m. before I woke---Chris said it shook the computer screen, and DS#2 called to say it had rattled the china in the hutch. That was the second earthshake I've ever felt, despite living close to the New Madrid fault for many years.

Thank you to Mike for all the dish-duty---I DID miss seeing the little round platter with the "log" handles, as I call it---mine has done cheeseball and shrimp mousse duty for a LONG time.

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Oh, and BTW, Kim, I find, at least to my palate, that the simpler the chicken saltimbocca the better.  I saw Giada make the recipe you tried, and thought.......umm, no.  I don't remember CI recipe specifics, but I think it was more along the lines of my preferences for this dish.  Thin chicken cutlets, fresh whole, sage leaves, wrapped with ultra thin prosciutto, light dredge of seasoned flour, saute in butter, pull cutlets, deglaze pan with splash of white wine & add more chopped fresh sage.  Maybe (???) lemon juice instead of the wine.....whatever, something acid.  Simple, quick and extremely yummy.

i agree. when i make saltimbocca i do the thin chicken cutlets, whole sage leaves but just add the prosciutto over the sage. brown on the "naked" side in olive oil for a minute or two then flip to the hammy side. another minute or two, pull the cutlets, top them with some thinly sliced aged provolone, deglaze with either marsala or vermouth. more sage then a squeeze of lemon juice. hit the cutlets with the pan sauce.

kim- showed the pictures of otis to a coworker who owns a pug and she was gushing about how cute he was - for a mature boy. she also thought naming your next pug roomba was perfect.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Making the vinaigrette:

gallery_28661_5901_91211.jpg

There always seems to be a cabinet door open in my kitchen - I live with little dents all over my head.

Just catching up now, great blog, Kim....thanks! And I'm glad to hear that my wife is not the only person out there who needs a safety helmet around the house.

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Hi, all! Sorry to be MIA today. We were very busy at work all morning, I went to meet Mr. Kim for lunch, shopped all afternoon and cooked all evening. Pictures are loading from my camera right now and I'll be back in a little bit to report.

I am feeling just fine today. I was up most of the night, but just tired and tummy tender this morning. Thank you for the concern!

Back soon!

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Enjoying all of your posts and looking forward to more. Most of all...looking forward to how you plan to use all of that luscious bacon!!!

Been checking out some older Dinner posts looking for a particular one and came across your beautiful Easter spread. So cool to see some of your beautiful pieces used to accent the look of your incredible food.

This is an wonderful blog. Anxious to keep hearing from you!!!!!

Donna

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Oh, and BTW, spent some time at your website and have copied many of the recipes to my computer cookbook!  So much to cook and so little time!!!!!!!

AMEN!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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eldereno & judiu - thank you for your kind words. I really love my website - it's been fun to build.

On to the report:

No breakfast picture this morning. My tummy was too tender from last night and I didn’t eat. I had a graham cracker at about 10 :huh: !

I met Mr. Kim for lunch at Kobe downtown – it’s a Japanese restaurant that Mr. Kim and his co-workers frequent, but I hadn’t ever been to.

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We set at the sushi bar to watch the fun:

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We started with miso soup and salad:

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I am not a huge fan of miso, but Mr. Kim says it was good.

A question the occurred to me about the ubiquitous iceberg lettuce salad with ginger dressing that is served at almost every Japanese-style restaurant I’ve ever been to. Is this authentic, or just a nod to US tastes? Does anyone know?

Mr. Kim had some salmon and tuna sushi:

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and Beef Yaki Soba:

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I also don’t eat sushi, but he says the fish was great. The soba, I do like and tried and it was wonderful – really flavorful!

I had the Pork Katsu w/ Gyoza (how do you pronounce that anyway?):

gallery_28661_5901_47619.jpg

I thought of you, Marlene :smile: ! The katsu was really good, crisp and juicy and the sauce was great and the gyoza wrap was so thin and tender and the filling moist. Very good. I’ll be back – and I don’t usually say that about sushi joints!

Dinner was a fat and calorie orgy. I made a sandwich from a wonderful website called thepioneerwoman.com . It is so much fun. She is a city girl who married a rancher and the site is her fish out of water story. She is a great photographer and talks about her kids, her husband (nicknamed Marlboro Man), and cooking among other things. She is my third favorite on line writer (behind our Rachel and Maggie :wub: )! Anyway, the sandwich is her husband’s favorite.

Mise for Marlboro Man’s Favorite Sandwich:

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cube steak, onion, rolls, BUTTER, Mrs. Dash garlic and herb blend (she calls for Lawry’s, but I have an aversion to that stuff), Worcestershire and hot sauce.

Frying the onions in BUTTER:

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Frying the cube steak in BUTTER:

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Toasting the rolls in BUTTER:

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See how BUTTERY they look:

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Tossing it all together in BUTTER:

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mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm:

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Fresh mozzarella for the sandwich (I use plain dental floss to slice it):

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Building the sandwich:

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This was a good sandwich, really beefy and gooey with cheese and, by the way, very BUTTERY!

For one of our sidedishes I tried Marlene’s Panko Coated Onion Rings. You can find the recipe at cookskorner.com , her website.

Mise for onion rings:

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sweet onion, flour, water, hot sauce, salt and panko (note the Top Chef Glad wrap product placement :laugh::laugh: )

Onions, batter and panko set up:

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The trusty and irreplaceable club aluminum dutch oven:

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Frying the rings:

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Is this beautiful?:

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These were just fantastic! You have to make these! They were the best onion rings I’ve ever had. Thanks for the recipe, Marlene!

The next dish wasn’t so successful. I tried a Cooking Light recipe for “Unfried Green Tomatoes”. Only 4.2 grams of fat per serving, as opposed to about 22 grams in fried ones :shock: . Sound wonderful, huh? Well, until you taste them, that is :hmmm: .

Mise for tomatoes:

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flour, cornmeal, S & P, sugar, green tomatoes and milk.

Lovely green tomatoes:

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Soaking in the milk:

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Dredging:

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Ready to be baked:

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Yes, I said baked. I know, I know, but I am experimenting this week.

This is what they looked like out of the oven:

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:sad: I was underwhelmed. See those uncooked spots? That can’t taste good.

So I thought about it. I had this already hot from the gorgeous onion rings:

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So I just tumped them in:

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:laugh:

They looked a lot better:

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But they still didn’t taste very good. I think I’ll just stick to my regular recipe!

Dessert was a little bit of this:

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It was from the bakery at The Fresh Market and called a Summerberry Stack – a nice little concoction of berries, cake, buttercream and custard. It was really good, but we were so full we only add a bite each!

Oh, can’t forget Mr. Kim’s favorite part of the evening:

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:sad::rolleyes:

Sleepy time – I have a lot planned for the weekend and Saturday morning is coming soon!

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Good Morning!!  Your dinner looks like Heaven on big white shiny plates.  And the candlegleam through the iced tea (G.R.I.T.S. all the way---iced tea on the table, wine notwithstanding).

I hope you're feeling better; mint on any kind of meat would send me to the showers---Chris did a little rack of lamb on the grill last night---I marinated it in a couple of tablespoons of the secret marinade he makes when he's doing tenderloins.  We keep a little jug in the freezer, and just pour out a bit---it never gets quite solid.  THEN when he brought it in, it was slick and shiny with some Baby Ray's Honey sauce.

AND the fork-bite he proffered to me had a little snick of pale green mint jelly just behind it.  I backed off, and he cut another bite, but I could still taste it from its touch to the fork tines.  It was just creamy-tender, and very un-lamby---no taste of the game.

WOIOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO  did you FEEL that???

We had one tremor this a.m. before I woke---Chris said it shook the computer screen, and DS#2 called to say it had rattled the china in the hutch.  That was the second earthshake I've ever felt, despite living close to the New Madrid fault for many years.

Thank you to Mike for all the dish-duty---I DID miss seeing the little round platter with the "log" handles, as I call it---mine has done cheeseball and shrimp mousse duty for a LONG time.

I thought about you when I heard about the quake and was glad there were no people hurt and no damage! It is amazing how much larger eGullet has made my realm of concern. I have always had the normal concern about other parts of the world when I heard about natural disasters, war, etc. But eGullet has made my concern much more personal.

Oh yes, bless my Mike for all the dishes this week! Not to mention the picture taking, sous-ing, eating at 10pm and being willing to spend the money on 2 pretty expensive dinners this week! I told him tonight that we made a good team this week, but that, as usual, he's done more than his share!

"I DID miss seeing the little round platter with the "log" handles, as I call it" - which platter do you mean? I'm not recognizing the reference. But then - it is 2am (later than our usual night owl outings :wink: ) and I'm a bit foggy!

Good night, dear!

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Is this beautiful?:

gallery_28661_5901_173718.jpg

gallery_28661_5901_232873.jpg

OHHHHHHHHHHH.MG............

If that isn't triple-XXX rated, I sure as heck don't know what is !!

*cue robot voice...* MUST MAKE ONION RINGS....MUST EAT ONION RINGS....MUST HAVE ONION RINGS.....

Wow.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Tonkatsu! One of my favourites. :smile: Must make soon.

I'm glad you liked the onion rings Kim. Even better, they can be made ahead and reheated and don't get soggy, which is always nice when you're looking for make ahead stuff!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Calorific orgy, indeed!!! Neither Rome nor Herculaneum had no such late-night delicacies presented on the golden plate, I'll vow. Just amazing.

More later---we're off to TN to meet the Georgia kids and Grands, so I'll have to wait til Sunday night for more of this---it's just wonderful.

Thank you for the great compliment---being linked with Maggie in any way is always a gift. And for your concern---nothing visible from the quake, but it was interesting to say the least.

Bye, now---I'm off to be the Wizard.

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Tonkatsu!  One of my favourites. :smile:  Must make soon.

I'm glad you liked the onion rings Kim.  Even better, they can be made ahead and reheated and don't get soggy, which is always nice when you're looking for make ahead stuff!

Actually I ended up doing just that. You say in the recipe that you can reheat and I took you word for it. I made them first and then did the rest of the meal and reheated them just before serving and they were just as good as the ones right out of the pan! I'm wondering now how they would go with breakfast :laugh: !

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As for your lunch at Kobe: Tell you what -- when next I'm in Richmond, I'll keep your hubby company for lunch. We could probably order the sushi combo for two and save some money. :biggrin:

Mise for Marlboro Man’s Favorite Sandwich:

gallery_28661_5901_66653.jpg

cube steak, onion, rolls, BUTTER, Mrs. Dash garlic and herb blend (she calls for Lawry’s, but I have an aversion to that stuff), Worcestershire and hot sauce.

Frying the onions in BUTTER:

gallery_28661_5901_64305.jpg

Frying the cube steak in BUTTER:

gallery_28661_5901_165478.jpg

gallery_28661_5901_99314.jpg

Toasting the rolls in BUTTER:

gallery_28661_5901_103564.jpg

See how BUTTERY they look:

gallery_28661_5901_49955.jpg

Tossing it all together in BUTTER:

gallery_28661_5901_24024.jpg

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm:

gallery_28661_5901_194264.jpg

Fresh mozzarella for the sandwich (I use plain dental floss to slice it):

gallery_28661_5901_81954.jpg

gallery_28661_5901_120359.jpg

Building the sandwich:

gallery_28661_5901_45492.jpg

gallery_28661_5901_125188.jpg

gallery_28661_5901_114301.jpg

This was a good sandwich, really beefy and gooey with cheese and, by the way, very BUTTERY!

After reading this, I was expecting a voice to come out and say, "Par-kay!"

All the same, that is a most interesting variation on a Philadelphia icon. There's a cheesemonger in the Italian Market that makes fresh mozz on the premises; this sounds like a good excuse to go get some. Looks yummy, and I put on five pounds just looking at the pictures.

Your onion rings look divine, and probably tasted as good as they look. Your unfried green tomatoes remind me of the unfortunate results I had with unfried eggplant in our tag-team weight-management blog. I guess:

1) some foods were just meant to be fried;

2) and if that's the case, you can't use the coatings meant for the imitations to produce the genuine article.

Though I did try the spread-the-eggplant-slices-with-mayo tip suggested to me after my mishap and got acceptable results.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Kim! You made Lee's Marlboro Man's Beef Sandwiches. Those are a favorite of my Kentucky man. I also make her cinnamon rolls (her recipe is so easy to follow) and the Chocolate Sheet cake. My family whoops with delight everytime I fix these goodies.

The pork is called "tonkatsu" (pronounced TON-cat-soo) while the the gyoza dumplings are pronounced (Gee-YOH-Zah).

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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Good morning, and wow!

This is a great way to sip the morning coffee: onion ring and buttery sandwich pornography! (Well, and an experiment not to be repeated. :raz:) I may have to change tonight's dinner plans. It's really a plus that the onion rings can be reheated without suffering. And that Marlboro Man sandwich, with its unabashed love of Real Butter...oh, my.

I like very much the way your photos flow: the mise, then the steps, then the finished (always beautifully arranged) dish. Kudos to you for the skillful cooking and writing, and to Mr. Kim for the photography! Isn't it nice to have an extra set of hands for that job? Otherwise you end up eating at 11 p.m. instead of 10 p.m. and *still* don't have the same grade of photo shots.

I'm looking forward to the rest of the ride!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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<snip>

So I thought about it.  I had this already hot from the gorgeous onion rings:

gallery_28661_5901_821.jpg

So I just tumped them in:

gallery_28661_5901_9879.jpg

:laugh:

I love that word: "tump" - the sound food makes when it's going into a pot of hot oil, perhaps - very useful! :biggrin:

I forgot to ask: how much of that fabulous sandwich did you manage to eat? How well will it reheat?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I also don’t eat sushi, but he says the fish was great.  The soba, I do like and tried and it was wonderful – really flavorful!

Kim, just out of curiosity.....has sushi been something that you've never liked, or is it a post-surgery thing? The reason I ask is because I have found it to be one of the foods that I just can't chew to "babyfood consistency"...so I really don't eat it much anymore. It was never my #1 food, so I don't miss it too terribly. I've gotten so used to chewing each mouthful at least 30 times that I don't even think about it anymore.....and for some reason it just takes all of the fun out of eating raw fish! :biggrin:

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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Kim! You made Lee's Marlboro Man's Beef Sandwiches. Those are a favorite of my Kentucky man. I also make her cinnamon rolls (her recipe is so easy to follow) and the Chocolate Sheet cake. My family whoops with delight everytime I fix these goodies.

The pork is called "tonkatsu" (pronounced TON-cat-soo) while the the gyoza dumplings are pronounced (Gee-YOH-Zah).

Thanks for the help on the pronounciations! Is 'ton' pork and 'katsu' the preparation? On the menu it was listed as Katsu with the different choices (pork, potato or chicken) underneath it.

I also don’t eat sushi, but he says the fish was great.  The soba, I do like and tried and it was wonderful – really flavorful!

Kim, just out of curiosity.....has sushi been something that you've never liked, or is it a post-surgery thing? The reason I ask is because I have found it to be one of the foods that I just can't chew to "babyfood consistency"...so I really don't eat it much anymore. It was never my #1 food, so I don't miss it too terribly. I've gotten so used to chewing each mouthful at least 30 times that I don't even think about it anymore.....and for some reason it just takes all of the fun out of eating raw fish! :biggrin:

No, I just don't like sushi. I have tried it a lot and just don't care for it. We went to Morimoto in Philly, where Mr. Kim said that the sushi was the best he'd ever had and I still didn't like it - so I guess I'm just not a fan. That is a good point about not wanting to chew raw fish as much as we need to chew, though.

I am getting my post ready for today's meals and field trips! We had a fun day. Back soon!

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Today was a long, fun day. I am going to bombard you with pictures. I wish I’d had time to post some of these earlier today because I always enjoy the shorter multiple daily posts rather than these marathons that I tend to do.

Breakfast was great today – everything was good! I made Purplewiz’s Individual Ham, Onion and Cheddar Quiche on a Biscuit Crust, Surry Sausage and Buttermilk Spice Muffins. Marcia – the quiches were so good and so easy to do! We really liked the biscuit crust!

Quiche mise:

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eggs, ham, cheddar, biscuit mix, milk, onion

Before the eggs:

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After the eggs:

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The muffin recipe came from a restaurant that we’ve been to a number of times visiting friends in Jacksonville, FL. It’s a chain called Mimi’s and we just love it. The care they take is really unusual for a chain - we are getting one here in Richmond soon.

Muffin mise:

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sugar, butter, eggs, flour, baking soda, nutmeg, cinnamon, buttermilk, walnuts

Grating the nutmeg:

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Dry stuff:

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Muffin batter:

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In the pan:

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Topping mixture:

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With the topping:

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Muffins!!!:

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Do we really need to see sausage cooking? If so, let me know, but for now – here they are all hot and sizzling and ready to pop:

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I am really confused about this sausage, though. I hadn't ever had it before, so I asked Fred, the meat counter guy, what to do with it. He said it was like bratwurst - to simmer and then grill or fry. So I simmered and fried. It was delicious. I googled it tonight and the only references to it that I can find are talking about a smoked, fully cooked sausage. You wouldn't need to simmer a fully cooked sausage would you? Just heat it up, if you wanted. Does anyone know anything about this? Also, the only information I could find seemed to associate them with Edwards meat products in Surry, VA. Anyone know if they are the only producers?

Plate:

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Don’t those little springform pans make lovely little pies?

Then we left the house!! Yay! By the way, here’s the house:

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Road trip!! First was the Farmer’s Market. It’s not the best market in the world and this was the first official open weekend so it was a little bare and we got there late. As a matter of fact, this was my only purchase:

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Well, its kinda food related. I don’t think I got a great deal – it was $8, but I really loved it. Now I just gotta find an insert.

Market shots:

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That’s Mr. Kim inspecting the tomato plants.

Next, we visited the Belmont Butchery, a wonderful real butcher shop. It is owned by Tanya Cauthen, who is truly passionate about food and eating locally. Her products are wonderful, since she is a chef she can offer advice about buying and cooking what she sells. This is the kind of place that gets an actual cow (a dead one) delivered and breaks it down themselves. They do a bit of their own charcuterie – and everything I’ve tried has been wonderful!

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Tanya didn’t want her picture taken, so this is one of her meat cutters:

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You’ll see what we bought tomorrow.

Next stop was the new Penzey’s in Carytown. I was so excited that I forgot to take any pictures :sad: ! It is a beautiful store and I hope they do really well. This is what we got:

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I didn’t need a lot because I’d just recently gotten an order from them. The cinnamon was free and the total for the rest of the stuff was just over $5. Cheaper and better than the grocery store!

I shopped at a couple of stores on the way home yesterday. I took the pictures surreptitiously with my phone, so it took me awhile to figure out how to upload and they are a bit fuzzy.

Our biggest Asian grocery is Tan A supermarket. Not great compared to what I’ve seen in other blogs, but I can wander around in here for a hour, just fascinated. I would love to visit it with someone who knows what everything is:

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Some produce and quails eggs:

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Obligatory Pocky shot:

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My haul:

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Crisp candies – these are the little shiny, different colored candies in front and in the bowl. They are so good – kind of like a Chick O Stick or the inside of a Butterfinger bar. The flavors include coconut, coffee, black sesame, nut meat, almond, peanut and cream. I also got preserved tangerine peel, coconut milk, Rainbow popcorn (we love this stuff), Wasabi salt, almond Pocky and peanut Paripo.

I also stopped at the Fresh Market, where I used to work full time and still work an occasional night:

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Produce:

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Seafood:

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Sausages:

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Bakery:

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Can you tell what my favorite department is?

Oil and Vinegar Aisle:

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Back home for dinner. Dinner was soup and sandwiches. The soup was Roasted Garlic & White Cheddar Cheese w/ Cayenne Croutons.

Soup mise:

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roasted garlic (I cheated and bought it already done off the olive bar at the Fresh Market), leeks, potatoes, chicken broth (Better than Bouillon), S&P, cheddar, milk and chives.

Sautéing the leeks and potatoes:

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After simmering:

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Crouton mise:

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butter, garlic, parsley, cayenne, salt, hot sauce, bread

Nicely spread:

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Finished soup:

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I have decided that I must just not really like cheese soup. It is just not ever cheesy enough for me. Mr. Kim liked this a lot, but all I tasted was potatoes, garlic and chicken stock. The croutons were tasty, though!

Now for the BLT’s! Remember the bacon Mr. Kim surprised me with :wub: ? I had to serve it to the poor man – he’s been so good this week!

BLT mise:

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I don’t really need to list the ingredients, huh? Those tomatoes are Campari tomatoes that I get at Costco. They are really good – even in winter. They are greenhouse grown in Canada. And I’ve been trying to cut down on food that has to be shipped so far, but I had the freakin’ bacon – what could I do :wink: ???

Bacon:

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This really is the best bacon that I have ever tasted. The package smells good when you get it, your house smells good when you cook it. The deep, rich porkiness of it just permeates your soul when you eat it. Amazing stuff!

Heaven on a plate:

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OK, we went to Kroger, too, to get a couple of things. And I got suckered by this:

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Does anyone else share my compulsion to buy these things? The little ‘cookbooks’ at the checkout. They ought to be free, they are nothing but ads for the companies that put them out. But they aren’t. As a matter of fact, they are fairly expensive. This one was $3.99 – a lot considering there are no articles and I may use ONE recipe out of the entire thing. But do I think about that? Nope – into the cart it goes and I pore over it when I get home like I’m going to find culinary Nirvana. Seriously, I have an entire shelf on my island devoted to these stupid things. Now, some of them are really old and therefore retro and cool. But most of them are from the past 5 years. Why do I do this?

Also, I want to know when everyone is getting here to pick up all the leftovers. You’re coming, right? Cuz, I certainly didn’t cook all this food for us. Two gastric bypass patients and someone trying to lose weight? Bring plenty of Gladware as Padma says!

Good night, all! See you tomorrow!

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