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hawg

Authentic Mexican Food in King/Snohomish County?

23 posts in this topic

Native Texan here, eating more economically (ie, that giant bag of beans from Costco!) now refering to her Rick Bayless book, needs FRESH MASA for the best homemade tortillas! Any chance someone can tell me where to get fresh Masa? I drove to Woodinville yesterday for supplies at a small Mexican grocery. Masa Harina worked ok for my first shot at making my own tortillas.

I didn't see any thread about Mexican food up here (saw the thread on tacos in North Portland/Gresham/Vancouver, WA), so I'm hoping there are some jewels to be discovered closer to Seattle. Anyone?


If it sounds good, it IS good!- Duke Ellington

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If you want fresh masa, you're probably going to have to make it yourself from nixtamal or try to get a tortilla factory to sell you some, which is unlikely to save you any money. Homemade tortillas from masa harina are really good, so unless you find them totally inferior to the tortillas of your memory, I'd forget about the fresh masa.

There's a lot of good Mexican food in Seattle. What part of town are you in and what are you looking for?


Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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Just posted about a new breakfast and lunch spot in Georgetown - La Sabrosita - off Michigan on 5th? I think it is worth checking out.

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There's a lot of good Mexican food in Seattle. What part of town are you in and what are you looking for?

I'm on the Eastside. I cook at home far more than I go out these days, but some fresh inspriation is welcomed. If there's a sweet little cantina in Redmond, Sammamish, Issaquah, Woodinville, Duvall, Carnation, Fall City... I'd make a trip for it. Guess I'm looking for rural/farm fresh type meals!

My toritillas from masa harina were ok, but not inspiring. I don't think I'm up for grinding my own masa. Thanks for your ideas.


If it sounds good, it IS good!- Duke Ellington

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Just posted about a new breakfast and lunch spot in Georgetown - La Sabrosita - off Michigan on 5th? I think it is worth checking out.

Thanks! Will do when I go over to visit art studios/gallerys!


If it sounds good, it IS good!- Duke Ellington

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I've bought fresh masa from the Mexican Grocery in the Pike Place Market, though not for a couple years.

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There is a huge Mexican Grocery store, (taking over a former QFC location) at the corner of Pacific Highway and Kent- des Moines Rd, that is close to opening. It is rumored to be the biggest Mexican grocery north of CA. Another part of the talk is that the whole strip mall is going to be turned into a Mexican town square theme.

The location is about 1/2 mile off I-5; there are also some pretty good, authentic Mexican eating places in the area.

Dave

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That sounds awesome.


Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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There is a huge Mexican Grocery store, (taking over a former QFC location) at the corner of Pacific Highway and Kent- des Moines Rd, that  is close to opening.  It is rumored to be the biggest Mexican grocery north of CA.  Another part of the talk is that the whole strip mall is going to be turned into a Mexican town square theme.

  The location is about 1/2 mile off I-5; there are also some pretty good, authentic Mexican eating places in the area.

Dave

That's really exciting--can't wait!


Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

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There is a huge Mexican Grocery store, (taking over a former QFC location) at the corner of Pacific Highway and Kent- des Moines Rd, that  is close to opening.  It is rumored to be the biggest Mexican grocery north of CA.  Another part of the talk is that the whole strip mall is going to be turned into a Mexican town square theme.

  The location is about 1/2 mile off I-5; there are also some pretty good, authentic Mexican eating places in the area.

Dave

oh-oh! This makes me happy, as it's close to my workplace!


Born Free, Now Expensive

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Just posted about a new breakfast and lunch spot in Georgetown - La Sabrosita - off Michigan on 5th? I think it is worth checking out.

Hey! They stole my name!


Gnomey

The GastroGnome

(The adventures of a Gnome who does not sit idly on the front lawn of culinary cottages)

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I have bought fresh masa at a small mexican grocery near my house. Can't remember the name but it is in a strip mall on 100th just north of Juanita Beach next the sewing and vacuum store.

It has been a couple of years, and you had to give them a couple days notice, but the tamales I made with it were quite good, and different than the ones I made with masa harina.


"Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food." -- Hippocrates

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There is a huge Mexican Grocery store, (taking over a former QFC location) at the corner of Pacific Highway and Kent- des Moines Rd, that  is close to opening.  It is rumored to be the biggest Mexican grocery north of CA.  Another part of the talk is that the whole strip mall is going to be turned into a Mexican town square theme.

  The location is about 1/2 mile off I-5; there are also some pretty good, authentic Mexican eating places in the area.

Dave

Can't wait to try it! Can you recommend a (Mexican) lunch spot that I try when I go down there?

cburnsi

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The Mexican grocer at the market always has fresh masa and its relatively cheap.

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There's a Mexican grocery store on the east side of 148th and Main in Bellevue - Guerrero's. I believe they carry fresh masa. They also have some great homemade salsa.

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Nice old thread.

I am interested in finding New Mexico peppers around Seattle. I will check out the above places but this thread is one economic crash dated so could any one help refresh the sources for quality Mexican and Southwest ingredients around Seattle?

For this I am willing to travel from my N. Seattle location.

Thanks ahead of time.


Robert

Seattle

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Nice old thread.

I am interested in finding New Mexico peppers around Seattle. I will check out the above places but this thread is one economic crash dated so could any one help refresh the sources for quality Mexican and Southwest ingredients around Seattle?

For this I am willing to travel from my N. Seattle location.

Thanks ahead of time.

Are you looking for the New Mexico chiles also known as Anaheims? If so, they are available at most grocery stores.


Practice Random Acts of Toasting

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Actually,no. NM Chiles aren't the same except in the vaguest since of color and to some bit shape. Anaheims are pretty tasteless compared to Hatch orother NM green chiles and I haven't had or seen Anaheims as reds. I got Fresh Hatchs as new crop green I think in August at Central market on 99N at 155th.

This time of year, I'd be happy with the strings of the about 5" long NM chiles red dried peppers. I don't know the correct word / name for these strings of peppers. But they make the most wonderful Red Chile.


Robert

Seattle

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Since those are regional chiles to the American southwest, you might find it a lot easier to use guajillos and anchos instead of NM dried chiles. ( I think the strings are called ristras.) For the fresh Hatch replacement, I think you can't find a better fresh chile than a Poblano anyway and you see those everywhere, although sometimes erroneously labeled as "pasilla".


Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

Twitter @RanchoGordo

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I did find a fairly new Mexican ON Bothel way just a bit south of greater down town Bothel that had my New Mexico peppers as well as several other types.

They also had the freshest Pintos I've had since I moved here several years ago.


Robert

Seattle

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I did find a fairly new Mexican ON Bothel way just a bit south of greater down town Bothel that had my New Mexico peppers as well as several other types.

They also had the freshest Pintos I've had since I moved here several years ago.

What's the name of the place?

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Can't tell you as when they closed they even took their sign. Too bad, it was a good store.


Robert

Seattle

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Check out the el Taco Loco truck in Ballard. Quite authentic, reminds me of the good Mexican taco trucks down in Los Angeles.


mise en plase

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