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eG Foodblog: Chris Hennes - Pork and chocolate, together at last!


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Hi Chris:

Is there any chance you can post the recipe for the bacon you made? Or is that too much work? I have made bacon several times in the past using a dry cure for 7 days and then smoking it in my Bradley electric smoker. I would then take it back to the butcher I bought the pork belly from and he would slice it for me at no charge. I'm curious to know what you put into the cure and the temperature of the smoker and how long you smoked it for. I used to smoke the bacon for about 4 hours - longer than that and it was too "smoky" if you know what I mean.

Thanks, Chris.

Elsie

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Is there any chance you can post the recipe for the bacon you made? 

I basically used the recipe from Ruhlman and Polcyn's Charcuterie---I'm afraid I don't have it on me at the moment. I added a ground bay leaf and a lot of black pepper, and left out the maple syrup.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Hello again, Chris:

I forgot to ask you if the book "Charcuterie" is actually practical for the average person or if one needs advanced cooking/smoking skills? Is the book mostly concerned with meat?

I also enjoy making chocolates - do you have a book called "Chocolates & Confections" by Peter P. Greweling? He is a master confectioner at the Culinary Institute of America. All the ingredients in his recipes are broken down by weight, both metric an imperial and also by percentages of the total. So, while the recipe as stated makes a lot, (usually around 150 pieces), the recipes can be easily scaled down. Thought you might be interested.

Keep on cooking......................

Elsie

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I forgot to ask you if the book "Charcuterie" is actually practical for the average person or if one needs advanced cooking/smoking skills?  Is the book mostly concerned with meat?

Yes, it is: there are some advanced recipes in there, but it starts off pretty simple. It is the book I learned from, and I am by no means an expert (and certainly wasn't when I started!). Also, there is a very helpful thread on the book over here.

I also enjoy making chocolates - do you have a book called "Chocolates & Confections" by Peter P. Greweling? 

Yes, that is my primary reference. It is far and away the best confections book I have seen for the novice confectioner. Again, helpful eGullet folks congregate over here.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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