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Recipes That Rock: 2008


maggiethecat
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Put on your lederhausen and pull out your accordion. This meat loaf recipe rocks Milwaukee-style. To say I was dubious is an understatement. I don't like sauerkraut.

But the view from the fridge and a scan of the much-underrated  food writer Marcia Adams's "Heartland"resulted  in tonight's dinner. "German Meat Loaf."

Two pounds of ground chuck. One pound of drained sauerkraut. Two cups of fresh rye bread crumbs. Two eggs. A T of ketchup. A big pinch of caraway seeds. Pepper. A half cup of diced onions. Mix, form, bake at 350.

Astounding! It didn't taste like sauerkraut, caraway or rye bread. It was light textured, deep flavored, mysterious and brilliant. And come to think of it, all that cabbage had to be good for us.

It rocked. (If I ever read "flyover country" from anyone here I will discount anything you write about stuff starting with momo, Keller or Masa. A good chef would put this on his menu tomorrow, with twiddly bits.)

Edited to add:Eat it hot. It doesn't rock as hard cold. Rats!

Maggie, did you shape the loaf 10 inches long by 8 inches wide as the recipe directs?

~Amy
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Ah, I was rereading one of Marcella Hazan's books and was reminded of something I learned some time ago but had forgotten in my time of no cooking: How to make absolutely the best green salad, in my opinion.

It's very simple; you put the leaves in a bowl, then add your salt first. After that, some extra-virgin olive oil, and then your vinegar, and then pepper if you like. When I first read about this I thought there was no way it could make such a difference, but for me at least it's worlds better than making a vinaigrette. Easier, too, for everyday salads with (or as) dinner.

Frequently I toss in some blue cheese and apples, or some other veg, or some nuts, but the point's the same: salt first! then oil, then vinegar.

I feel the need to wander out to the garden and cut myself some lettuce now.

Jennie

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I tried corn and potato pancakes from Tom Colicchio's Think Like a Chef that I'll be making again. The recipe calls for baking a russet potato (I cheated and boiled it) and mashing it. Mix in corn kernels cut off the cob, along with egg yolks, creme fraiche and a little flour. Then you fold in egg whites, which lightens the whole thing up, and fry small patties. They were great, and the batter even held up for a second day. Major pain to flip, but other than that, they're a great side dish.

Tried these Saturday night. I thought they were OK but my family and friends really loved them. Will probably do them again at the end of summer when there is really good, sweet local corn.

Donna

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Anna Nanni's Ragu alla Bolognese, courtesy of Saveur, is the Bolognese recipe I've been looking for. It tasted like I was back in Italy. :wub: Rich, meaty, with a nice acidity. I thought it was even better than the ragu I had at Batali's B&B Ristorante and I enjoyed that very much.

I also made the accompanying Baked Spinach Lasagne, using the ragu. It was very good, but the spinach lasagne sheets were a pain to make -- some fell apart while cooking and they were almost impossible to spread out on a towel after cooking. The ragu is already very rich, so adding cheese and bechamel sauce is a bit overwhelming.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just thought it would be fun to share my months favorite. Yo know how certain recipes become popular for a while and then fade away only to be replaced by a new one.... so this is our latest favorite:

There are two ways to do it and both are simple. It is extra simple for me as I have the Tehina paste that comes with herbs and all I do is add water- this appears in demo and explanations on my food blog - page 3 towards the end of the page. Otherwise :

Tehina

about 125 g tehina paste

1/3 cup water- best to use mineral

juice of half a lemon

1 crushed garlic clove

salt to taste

paprika-sweet

chopped fresh parsley

method

mix lemon juice and salt

add to tehina. If it seizes no fear!

Slowly tablespoon by tablespoon add water. Add 1 TBL, mix it in then another. Soon the tehina will change color to whiter and then you just keep adding till you get your desired consistency. SOme like it runny almost like a thick salad dressing, some like it thicker. Taste and add paprika or salt or whatever to your taste. Add parsley. If you want green tehina add a lot of finely chopped parsley. You can also add olive oil to taste to replace some of the water.

Eggplant method 1

2 medium eggplants or 4 small ones. Roast eggplant directly on high flame about 20 mins each side till skin is really burnt. Make a lengthwise slit on each eggplant and pour in tehina. Top with a bitof olive oil and eat with a teaspoon.

Eggplant method 2

Slice eggplant into quite thin slices and place in baking tray. I spray the bottoms and tops of the slices with olive oil spray. Roast in oven till brown. Turn slices over and roast till brown. Take out of oven. Now I slice 2 tomatoes. I place one slice eggplant in baking dish, put a tomato slice on the top of it and then place another eggplant slice on top of the tomato slice- like a sandwich. So fill up the baking tray with lots of these sandwiches. Pour the tehina over everything so all sandwiches get a nice share. Bake again till hot and eat! Delicious if you like eggplant. This is my preferred method. And it is healthy too!

By the way you can replace the eggplant with cauliflower pieces.

Tell me if you enjoyed it! :smile:

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Oooh -- Lior, eggplant method 2 sounds totally delicious to me! (Though I must admit, I don't think I'll be able to resist a little feta sprinkled on top before baking)... Will definitely try and let you know!

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  • 4 weeks later...

gallery_6375_3224_446281.jpeg

Note the expression of teenager culinary bliss on my nephew Miles's face, as he chowed down on the chorizo lollipops we made for a family party. (The lovely woman in the picture is my sister-in-law.) This was snapped before the other guests arrived, and we had to cut Miles off lest the platter be empty when other peeps showed up. I don't know where we saw the recipe -- a tapas cookbook? -- but these lollipops went fast.

Cook chorizo. Cut into discs. Caramelize sugar, insert toothpick in sausage, dip. The caramel should be golden when you begin to dip -- it darkens. And watch your hands! Even a tiny drop of molten sugar hurts like hell.

Swoonworthy.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Just thought it would be fun to share my months favorite. Yo know how certain recipes become popular for a while and then fade away only to be replaced by a new one.... so this is our latest favorite:

There are two ways to do it and both are simple. It is extra simple for me as I have the Tehina paste that comes with herbs and all I do is add water- this appears in demo and explanations  on my food blog - page 3 towards the end of the page. Otherwise :

Tehina

about 125 g tehina paste

1/3 cup water- best to use mineral

juice of half a lemon

1 crushed garlic clove

salt to taste

paprika-sweet

chopped fresh parsley

method

mix lemon juice  and salt

add to tehina. If it seizes no fear!

Slowly tablespoon by tablespoon add water. Add 1 TBL, mix it in then another. Soon the tehina will change color to whiter and then you just keep adding till you get your desired consistency. SOme like it runny almost like a thick salad dressing, some like it thicker. Taste and add paprika or salt or whatever to your taste. Add parsley. If you want green tehina add a lot of finely chopped parsley. You can also add olive oil to taste to replace some of the water.

Eggplant method 1

2 medium eggplants or 4 small ones. Roast eggplant directly on high flame about 20 mins each side till skin is really burnt. Make a lengthwise slit on each eggplant and pour in tehina. Top with a bitof olive oil and eat with a teaspoon.

Eggplant method 2

Slice eggplant into quite thin slices and place in baking tray. I spray the bottoms and tops of the slices with olive oil spray. Roast in oven till brown. Turn slices over and roast till brown. Take out of oven. Now I slice 2 tomatoes. I place one slice eggplant in baking dish, put a tomato slice on the top of it and then place another eggplant slice on top of the tomato slice- like a sandwich. So fill up the baking tray with lots of these sandwiches. Pour the tehina over everything so all sandwiches get a nice share. Bake again till hot and eat! Delicious if you like eggplant. This is my preferred method. And it is healthy too!

By the way you can replace the eggplant with cauliflower pieces.

Tell me if you enjoyed it! :smile:

This sounds wonderful but I am confused. Is Tehina paste the same thing as the Tahini we get here in the U.S.?

pat

Edited by Pat W (log)

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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Anna Nanni's Ragu alla Bolognese, courtesy of Saveur, is the Bolognese recipe I've been looking for. It tasted like I was back in Italy. 

I will concur - the best bolognese - a couple of weeks ago I quadrupled the recipe just so I could freeze it - and trust me it's better re-heated!!!

T

Live and learn. Die and get food. That's the Southern way.

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Just thought it would be fun to share my months favorite. Yo know how certain recipes become popular for a while and then fade away only to be replaced by a new one.... so this is our latest favorite:

There are two ways to do it and both are simple. It is extra simple for me as I have the Tehina paste that comes with herbs and all I do is add water- this appears in demo and explanations  on my food blog - page 3 towards the end of the page. Otherwise :

Tehina

about 125 g tehina paste

1/3 cup water- best to use mineral

juice of half a lemon

1 crushed garlic clove

salt to taste

paprika-sweet

chopped fresh parsley

method

mix lemon juice  and salt

add to tehina. If it seizes no fear!

Slowly tablespoon by tablespoon add water. Add 1 TBL, mix it in then another. Soon the tehina will change color to whiter and then you just keep adding till you get your desired consistency. SOme like it runny almost like a thick salad dressing, some like it thicker. Taste and add paprika or salt or whatever to your taste. Add parsley. If you want green tehina add a lot of finely chopped parsley. You can also add olive oil to taste to replace some of the water.

Eggplant method 1

2 medium eggplants or 4 small ones. Roast eggplant directly on high flame about 20 mins each side till skin is really burnt. Make a lengthwise slit on each eggplant and pour in tehina. Top with a bitof olive oil and eat with a teaspoon.

Eggplant method 2

Slice eggplant into quite thin slices and place in baking tray. I spray the bottoms and tops of the slices with olive oil spray. Roast in oven till brown. Turn slices over and roast till brown. Take out of oven. Now I slice 2 tomatoes. I place one slice eggplant in baking dish, put a tomato slice on the top of it and then place another eggplant slice on top of the tomato slice- like a sandwich. So fill up the baking tray with lots of these sandwiches. Pour the tehina over everything so all sandwiches get a nice share. Bake again till hot and eat! Delicious if you like eggplant. This is my preferred method. And it is healthy too!

By the way you can replace the eggplant with cauliflower pieces.

Tell me if you enjoyed it! :smile:

This sounds wonderful but I am confused. Is Tehina paste the same thing as the Tahini we get here in the U.S.?

pat

Same product. The second eggplant recipe is addictive!

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This month I've been mainly rocking recipes from my latest cookbook obsession, The Ottolenghi Cookbook. I'm not sure whether it's available outside the UK yet, but when it is you should all buy it! (I don't work there, promise.) Some recipes here:

http://www.ottolenghi.co.uk/blog/category/recipes/

Anyway, we had a barbecue on Saturday and I made a broad bean and radish salad, with preserved lemon, which was delightful, and very easy to make. Served with bourbon basted ribs (recipe from Olive Magazine - a huge hit) and pork and chorizo burgers (Sunday Suppers at Lucques - loving that book too). The burgers are officially the BEST. BURGERS. EVER. According to the OH, that is. I also made Rob's Famous Coleslaw, also from Sunday Suppers, which is quite the nicest coleslaw I've ever had. The secret, I think, is that you reduce half a cup of red wine vinegar, add a couple of TBSP of honey and then mix it with the veggies before adding mayonnaise. It makes the slaw beautifully light and tangy.

For dessert, we had rosewater and pistachio meringue with whipped cream, raspberries and passion fruit. The meringue was an Ottolenghi recipe as well. It was different to other meringue recipes I've made in that it called for warming the sugar first. It make for a wonderfully glossy, stiff meringue, which was squishy in the middle, just the way I like it.

YUM!

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From Jeanne Kelley's Blue Eggs and Yellow Tomatoes (beautiful book), a version of one of her pastas that also makes one of the best cold pasta salads on the planet....

Um, I'm doing this off the top of my head, so use whatever amounts you like....

tomatoes (sliced cherry or whatever you like)

garlic

olive oil

pasta (orecchiette, tortellini, penne, whatever you like)

white balsamic vinegar (a couple of tablespoons, more or less, to taste)

a mix of whatever herbs you like (oregano, thyme, rosemary, basil, aurgula, and, important, chopped green onions)

salt and pepper

grated parmesan

I use a mix of cheese tortellini and orecchiette, but you could do it any old way, with penne, or something smallish. And we saute the tomatoes in olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper first.

So, saute some tomatoes, either chopped or pressed garlic, salt and pepper.

Boil your pasta. Drain.

Add the sauteed tomato mix to the pasta, or if you're using a big enough pan, just dump the drained pasta to the pan, and then dump everything into a large bowl because it's easier to mix.... then the balsamic vinegar and perhaps a little more olive oil, and then your herbs, salt and pepper. Mix well, taste and adjust seasonings, add lots of grated parmesan.

It's fabulous warm, and it's fabulous cold (brought to room temp). Make it a couple of days ahead for however you want to use it.

Also, about making your own ricotta, which, come to think of it, might be a nice addition to that pasta above, if you use goat milk, you get a really lovely flavor.

Edited by devlin (log)
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Mine was Vegetable and Chick Peas Salad recipe

Hope you enjoy this one as much as I did !

2635431945_cc553f3fb1_o.jpg

Talat_kas, that salad looks beautiful, but the link does not work right. Thanks!

Here is the recipe for you:

Preparation time : 15mins | Serve 4-6 persons

Ingredients for Vegetable and Chick Peas Salad:

½ cup onion (julienne)

½ cup tomato (cut in small square pieces)

½ cup cucumber (julienne)

½ cup cabbage (julienne)

3-4 green chilies (chopped)

1 cup chick peas (boiled)

3-4 tbspn olive oil

Salt to taste

1 tspn black pepper

2-3 tbspn lemon juice

Procedure for Vegetable and Chick Peas Salad:

1. Mix all the ingredients in the bowl and put in fridge for 30mins.

2. Delicious healthy salad is ready to serve. You can add vegetables of your own choice.

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Mine was Vegetable and Chick Peas Salad recipe

Hope you enjoy this one as much as I did !

2635431945_cc553f3fb1_o.jpg

Talat_kas, that salad looks beautiful, but the link does not work right. Thanks!

Here is the recipe for you:

Preparation time : 15mins | Serve 4-6 persons

GREAT! Thanks so much! :wub:

Ingredients for Vegetable and Chick Peas Salad:

½ cup onion (julienne)

½ cup tomato (cut in small square pieces)

½ cup cucumber (julienne)

½ cup cabbage (julienne)

3-4 green chilies (chopped)

1 cup chick peas (boiled)

3-4 tbspn olive oil

Salt to taste

1 tspn black pepper

2-3 tbspn lemon juice

Procedure for Vegetable and Chick Peas Salad:

1. Mix all the ingredients in the bowl and put in fridge for 30mins.

2. Delicious healthy salad is ready to serve. You can add vegetables of your own choice.

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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What a great thread! I just fixed the fruit salad with honey-lime dressing, and it's super!

We're having Nigella's chicken and sausage bake Monday night.

I printed out a lot of other recipes that I plan to make soon...very soon.

My winners so far this year are:

Green Bean and Hazelnut Salad from the May 2008 Gourmet. I didn't mind buying the hazelnut oil, but the only flaxseed oil I can find here is nearly $20, so unless I can find someone to split it with me, I'll continue to substitute canola oil. Be sure to toast the hazelnuts until you can smell toasted nuts, or the flavor won't be there. I toast them in a dry skillet on top of the stove, moving them constantly until they're ready. I also couldn't find whole hazelnuts at the store (although I know where in town I can get them, and will try them soon), so I used chopped hazelnuts.

Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Browned Butter from the September 2007 Cooking Light couldn't be easier, and it's just plain yummy.

My mother discovered Penne with Tomatoes, Olives and Two Cheeses from the Epicurious website, and it's become a keeper at our house.

Skillet Chicken and Vegetables is a weeknight go-to in our house now. I add Herbes de Provence to add flavor. It's a really basic recipe that you can tweak to your heart's delight.

Asparagus Melt with Pesto Spread is simple, made for summer, and a great way to use tomatoes.

Yesterday I made a salad that absolutely rocked! A boyfriend from Lebanon made it for me 25 years ago, and I improved on it by one step, by using champagne vinegar instead of regular:

for one person:

1 small tomato, seeded and diced into approx. 1/2" pieces

1/2 cucumber, peeled, seeded, and diced into approx. 1/2" pieces

equal parts champagne vinegar and good olive oil

about a tablespoon of chopped fresh mint leaves

Toss together, eat, and be reminded that summer is a good thing, despite the heat.

Jenny

P.S. That same boyfriend also added Miracle Whip and vinegar to a can of Veg-All, and it wasn't too bad, as I remember it. But love can be as taste-less as it is blind. He also baked a steak with cherry tomatoes and cinnamon... ...I have such fond memories of him!

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  • 1 month later...

Hi folks --

Wanted to revive this thread, and thought I'd mention the David Lebovitz Easy Jam Tart -- fantastic!

http://www.davidlebovitz.com/archives/2008/07/jam_tart.html

The crust could not be easier -- no rolling, you actually push it into the tart pan -- and was flaky and buttery with a hint of cornmeal. The amount of jam is just perfect -- just the right balance for the crust. And it really is as he says -- the whole thing gets significantly better the second day, and stays just as good the third day... In fact I really think it is worth making a day in advance to let the flavors meld -- it is so nice to have an elegant dessert that can be made the day ahead of a big dinner party...

Emily

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Oooh -- forgot to mention -- I made the Eggplant Gratin that eldoreno posted about so long ago, and it is FANTASTIC. SO good. Both times I made it I added a layer of sauteed zucchini slices as well, which were a nice addition... Just writing about this is making me want it again, despite the fact I just made it a week ago (for a dinner party with vegetarians, so that's a nice use for it)... Note that I don't have individual gratin dishes so I've made it in various larger baking dishes with no problem...

Emily

Made a new recipe, from Ina Garten, Eggplant Gratin.  What I liked about the recipe was that it looked like it could be assembled one day and baked the next, which is what I did.  I roasted the eggplant instead of frying, that worked well, though next time I will undercook it slightly.  Once cooked entirely the first time, made the eggplant a little mushy in the final product......but wow!!! what flavor for something easy and made ahead.  My entire family loved it.

Keep in mind that, though I love to cook, my work hours and fatigue at the end of the day keep me from cooking during the week.  A lot of mediocre take-out is often our meals during the work week.  Could be why they loved it?!?!?!

But for anyone else with similar need, this might be a great addition to the recipe box!

I have ingredients to begin marinating the chicken for Nigella's chicken and sausage bake, recommended from some here.  Looking forward to that!  Planning to use mostly sweet Italian sausages and just a few hot ones.

BTW, can recommend the Tomato and Gorgonzola Sauce with Pasta Shells also suggested on this thread.  Made it last night for dinner with a salad.  Enjoyed!

Love this thread!!!!  Keep the discussion going!!!!

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Football season. Time for dishes that you can cook all day and make the house smell so wonderful. I made "Anna Nanni's Ragu alla Bolognese"

recommended by others on this thread. It was amazing. I went slowly and really did each step separately something that I don't always do. That is definitely the way to go. It brought to mind Sara Moulton talking about depth of and layers of flavor. It did take quite a few hours but it was really worth it. We used really good ingredients and even ground a piece of pork butt ourselves instead of buying ground pork. I could not remember where the recipe was originally from so I "Googled" it and found it on the Saveur web-site. They also have "Anna Nanni's Spinach Lasagne", using of course the Bolognese. We doubled the recipe for the Bolognese when we made it, so we are going to use the leftovers for the lasagna. You should definitely at least double the recipe. If you are going to go through all of that work, come away with a larger batch. We are going to vaccum-freeze it and make the lasagna sometime soon.

A word of warning. Since you need to have a spoon near the pot to stir it ever-so-often, be aware of the fact that you will be eating it by the spoonful as it is cooking. Truely YUM!

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Anna Nanni's Ragu alla Bolognese, courtesy of Saveur, is the Bolognese recipe I've been looking for. It tasted like I was back in Italy. 

I will concur - the best bolognese - a couple of weeks ago I quadrupled the recipe just so I could freeze it - and trust me it's better re-heated!!!

T

Question -- do you make the homemade tomato paste that this dish calls for? Do you think it's necessary for a fabulous dish (similar to the difference between homemade chicken stock and canned broth)? I ask because the tomato crop this year has been dismal and there has not been many good tomatoes to be found.

Thanks!

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Anna Nanni's Ragu alla Bolognese, courtesy of Saveur, is the Bolognese recipe I've been looking for. It tasted like I was back in Italy. 

I will concur - the best bolognese - a couple of weeks ago I quadrupled the recipe just so I could freeze it - and trust me it's better re-heated!!!

T

Question -- do you make the homemade tomato paste that this dish calls for? Do you think it's necessary for a fabulous dish (similar to the difference between homemade chicken stock and canned broth)? I ask because the tomato crop this year has been dismal and there has not been many good tomatoes to be found.

Thanks!

I did not make the homemade tomato paste and don't think it's necessary for a fabulous dish.

Edited by mukki (log)
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