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Luckylies

Caramel in Flan & Creme Caramel

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how thick (how much caramel) the caramel is in the bottom of the pan will determine whether there is a little disc of caramel left in the pan. obviously, the longer the flan sits before being unmolded will also determine if there is any caramel left in the pan as well...whether it gets dissolved before being unmolded.

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forever_young_ca - Thanks for the tip. I'll try it tomorrow.

Lonnie - I vary between using a bit of water and just plain sugar, but most of the time I don't add water. I like the caramel pretty dark too. Just before the point where it could turn bitter/burnt, just like you do. I can't even imagine making flan with a pale caramel.

Many times I can't even get to flip it over because everyone is hovering over it and want some immediately. They wait for it to cool off though because the last time one of them cut a piece out while it was warm I flipped out on them. A few hours in the fridge is best, but even better overnight - if I can keep them away from it.

alanamoana - I sometimes think that it's because the bottom of the mold touches the bottom of the pan in the oven. Maybe if I place something between them it won't happen as much.

My mom brought me a pana (breadfruit) last week and I reserved some to boil & mash it up to equal a cupful. I used this to make flan for Easter dinner and it was delicious. I made one with cream cheese the next day especially for my youngest son who stands by my side just to lick whatever I use to stir the mix. He's 24 mind you...

I'll be making another one later on this week and will post a pic of it.

Thanks to all for your kind suggestions and opinions.

Sandra

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In "Baking from My Home to Yours" Dorie Greenspan recommends a couple of things -

1) Line the roasting pan with a double thickness of paper towels.

2) Put the pan that is going to hold the flan in the oven to heat while you prepare the caramel.

These tips, plus an overnight rest in the fridge helps soften most of the caramel.

I have noticed that if I make individual flans and have some leftover, and put them in the fridge a second night, all of the carmel will become soft. However, there are not often leftovers :biggrin:

I like my sugar very coloured as well, and always use sugar, no water.

Sometimes I do individual flans, but I like the look of a large flan set out on a beautiful serving tray. It is a more spectacular presentation, and easier for guests to pick at and have seconds!


Life is short, eat dessert first

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Thanks for the info!

I forgot to mention that with the last one I made, i used a different mold and had some mix left over so I poured the rest into a large ramekin - without caramel - and set it in the same bain marie. It was done before the other one and it was a PITA to get it out without disturbing the other flan. I won't do that again!

It was good, but tasted more like a creme brulee without the sugar glaze on top... but it was gone before I had a chance to savor a second spoonful.

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*Bump*

 

How would one go about making the flan's caramel layer with caramelized fruit juice? I ask because I had an amazing and delicious flan last year with prickly pear caramel. I wouldn't mind trying to make it myself. Could it be as simple as cooking a fruit syrup until it begins to turn brownish, like caramel, then go on with the rest of the custard as usual? Would syrup be the better starting point, or juice?

 

20181118_174310.jpg


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I'm interested in the answer too, Smithy. I still remember the prickly pear creme brulee we had at the Farview Lodge restaurant in Mesa Verde many years ago. Using the juice in place of all or part of the sugar might be worth pursuing.

 

But now that I think about it, probably the juice could be reduced and then mixed in with the custard. Or maybe with the sugar? My memory of the creme brulee was that it was in the custard.


Edited by Nancy in Pátzcuaro add content (log)

Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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12 hours ago, Smithy said:

*Bump*

 

How would one go about making the flan's caramel layer with caramelized fruit juice? I ask because I had an amazing and delicious flan last year with prickly pear caramel. I wouldn't mind trying to make it myself. Could it be as simple as cooking a fruit syrup until it begins to turn brownish, like caramel, then go on with the rest of the custard as usual? Would syrup be the better starting point, or juice?

 

20181118_174310.jpg

 

This looks to me like a caramel sauce made separately and poured over, not a hard crack caramel baked with the custard.  The custard doesn't have that distinctive dark layer that happens when baked with caramel.  'So I'd caramelize some sugar and deglaze with fruit juice, probably Perfect Puree.  https://www.perfectpuree.com/product/prickly-pear/

 

And a smaller plate, definitely 😂

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