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Sugar glass coating for nuts


thegreatdane
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Does anyone know how to keep sugar coated nuts from sticking together? I melted some sugar in a pan and when completely liquid I added the nut bits and about a tablespoon of butter. They looked great for a day or two then started sticking together. Any way to keep them shiny and separate?

Many thanks,

Tom

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You can toss in a teaspoon or two of diced up cocoa butter at the end; keep stirring until all of the cocoa butter is melted and then separate the nuts on a silpat and allow to dry.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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You need to buy some kind of desiccate to store with the nuts to absorb the moisture. Look up desiccate for a list of substances that are desiccates.

While working at at restaurant I made candied nuts all the time. I bought a product called Damp Rid or Dri-Z-Air from the hardware store (http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productList&N=0&Ntk=i_products&Ntt=damp%20rid). Just put a little Damp Rid in cheesecloth or in a plastic container with vent holes. You also want to make sure that the container that you store the nuts in is kept sealed tight and isnt left uncovered too long.

This also works great for tuile cookies and sugar work. Also make sure your caramelizing the sugar. If the nuts are still sticky after there dry, no amount of desiccate will help.

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You need to buy some kind of desiccate to store with the nuts to absorb the moisture.  Look up desiccate for a list of substances that are desiccates.

While working at at restaurant I made candied nuts all the time.  I bought a product called Damp Rid or Dri-Z-Air from the hardware store (http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productList&N=0&Ntk=i_products&Ntt=damp%20rid).  Just put a little Damp Rid in cheesecloth or in a plastic container with vent holes.  You also want to make sure that the container that you store the nuts in is kept sealed tight and isnt left uncovered too long.

This also works great for tuile cookies and sugar work.  Also make sure your caramelizing the sugar.  If the nuts are still sticky after there dry, no amount of desiccate will help.

Are these safe for use around food? Not all desiccants are.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I'm thinking of going small time commercial with these, if I can get a good recipe, so they'd have to be able to sit on the shelf. I did try the cocoa butter as well as dairy butter, and not much difference there. Is there anything other than a dessicant to keep them from becoming sticky? A way to process the sugar, or a different type?

Thanks,

Tom

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You might want to try Isomalt? I know that resists getting sticky, but I don't know for how long.

The properties of sugar (the fact that it's hygroscopic; meaning it attracts moisture from the air) means that stickiness will always be a problem.

Have you ever noticed those little dessicant vials and tiny packets that are packaged in both food and non food items? That might be the route you have to go if you are making something that you want to package and sell. :wink:

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You might want to try Isomalt?

From Wikipedia:

"Isomalt is a natural sugar substitute, a type of sugar alcohol... it carries a very real risk of gastric distress, including flatulence and diarrhea..."

Dessicants are a good idea, though probably bulky for what I want to do.

How about a different sugar; agave?

Thanks,

Tom

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From a website touting agave:

Agave Nectar enhances product freshness due to its hygroscopic properties which act as humidifying agents, thereby increasing the shelf life of such products.

Agave does not have the same properties as refined sugar, but is still hygroscopic. So even if you were able to get a hard coating with agave (which I don't believe you can-agave is more similar to honey than sugar), you'd still have the same problem.

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From a website touting agave:
Agave Nectar enhances product freshness due to its hygroscopic properties which act as humidifying agents, thereby increasing the shelf life of such products.

Agave does not have the same properties as refined sugar, but is still hygroscopic. So even if you were able to get a hard coating with agave (which I don't believe you can-agave is more similar to honey than sugar), you'd still have the same problem.

Thanks for the Agave info. I'll skip that for now.

I'll bet there's a technique, probably patented, that allows the sugar coating to remain clear, hard, and non-sticky. Hmmm... Still looking.

Tom

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I have made them in a crock pot and used powdered sugar to get the glaze ..once they were done they stayed dry and crispy for a few days it depends on how often the bag is opened I think as well as to how long they will stay fresh....you can google crockpot sugar glazed nuts or whatever.....try one of the recipes and see what you think

I think roasting nuts in the crockpot is ideal and the glazed ones were good I made them sweet hot and salty

or you will really have to just make a candy glaze and add the nuts like a brittle/toffee recipe but the nuts stay appart?

I dont know just tossing ideas

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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I'll bet there's a technique, probably patented, that allows the sugar coating to remain clear, hard, and non-sticky. Hmmm...

If there was, I bet the Cracker Jack people would be right on it. :wink:

That does make me wonder how they keep Cracker Jacks from sticking together.

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You can use Gum Arabic to give the nuts a glossy coating. I got information on using it here, some time back. I've found the post but can't figure out how to link it. Anyway, it gives the nuts a gloss, and I don't think they end up sticky. But it's not a sugar coating, so you won't get that effect, if that's what you've after.

www.cheri-pie.com

Life is too short. Eat good chocolate.

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You can use Gum Arabic to give the nuts a glossy coating.  I got information on using it here, some time back.  I've found the post but can't figure out how to link it.  Anyway, it gives the nuts a gloss, and I don't think they end up sticky.  But it's not a sugar coating, so you won't get that effect, if that's what you've after.

Gum arabic as a coating over a sugar coating? May work. This is where an industrial producer could be helpful; how to coat with sugar and keep it from becoming sticky? Surely, here's a way. How about breakfast cereals? How do they do that?

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one of the chefs i worked with used to toss the nuts in honey, then put them on a sheet pan in the oven until the honey caramelized, then he would toss them in a bowl with a little regular sugar until coated (and add a touch of salt and whatever seasonings), then lay them on a clean sheet pan to dry. you could probably substitute some sugar syrup for the honey if you wanted to keep that simple.

what about corn starch? don't manufacturers use it to mold gummy bears, then shake off all the excess?

i think the butter is maybe causing some of the stickiness..because pure sugar will carmelize hard as a rock, but maybe the butter prevents it from getting all the way hard??? maybe reduce the butter?

in the open air, any carmelized product is going to melt, so you just have to prevent it from melting in the sealed package.

Edited by sugarseattle (log)

Stephanie Crocker

Sugar Bakery + Cafe

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in the open air, any carmelized product is going to melt, so you just have to prevent it from melting in the sealed package.

Yeah, a sealed package may be all I need. I'll try that and keep looking for something that'll protect it in the open air. Thanks, all! This is a great group of people.

Tom

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after the nuts have been sugar glazed, apply a sealant to them (say, capol 150). lots of different types of sealants available, from shellac to cellulistic based. as long as it's providing a moisture barrier, you'll be in good shape. if you have a pan, it's easiest to spray it onto the particulates as they're rotating in the pan.

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after the nuts have been sugar glazed, apply a sealant to them (say, capol 150).  lots of different types of sealants available, from shellac to cellulistic based.  as long as it's providing a moisture barrier, you'll be in good shape.  if you have a pan, it's easiest to spray it onto the particulates as they're rotating in the pan.

Sebastian,

Thanks for that idea. Where can I learn more about applying sealants and obtain some to try out?

Is that how Cracker Jack or sugar coated cereals do it?

Many thanks,

Tom

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https://www.shopchefrubber.com/home.php?cat=1186

might be a good place to start.  i've not spent much time looking for retail sources, but i'm sure there are others.  the good folks at chef rubber could walk you through the specific products they have, their uses, and their limitations..

Thanks, Sebastian. I'm off to research that now, and then some trial and hopefully success soon.

I appreciate your help.

Tom

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https://www.shopchefrubber.com/home.php?cat=1186

might be a good place to start.  i've not spent much time looking for retail sources, but i'm sure there are others.  the good folks at chef rubber could walk you through the specific products they have, their uses, and their limitations..

Sebastian,

I contacted Chef Rubber and they said the confectioner's glaze they have leaves sugar looking cloudy. There's one other possible lead, but if you have another idea I'd appreciate it.

Thanks,

Tom

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Sorry to hear that. You can also try the good folks at Centerchem (www.centerchem.com), ask about products such as capol 150 to start with. They're more geared up for industral supply, but may be able to help you locate smaller distributors who carry their products...good luck!

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whoa, you guys are thinking very hard on this subject, thats great.

All you have to do is keep tossing and stirring the nuts until the are fully crystallized on the outside, possibly adding a tablespoon of sugar here and there to speed up the crystallization.

Make the caramel, add the nuts and the butter, reduce the heat a little bit and cook and stir the nuts constantly, sprinkling sugar in ever so over, and just keep stirring them up untill they are rough on the exterior. Once the coating of sugar is fully crystallized it is very stable and would take a good deal of moisture to make them stick. crystallized sugar is in a happy state, theres not much phase changing if any.

Whoever in put cocoa butter, that helps at the end too (after crystallization). The fat solidifies on the outside and makes a nice thin barrier.

If you really want to get commercial, carnauba wax coating at the end will keep those suckers seperate indefinitely, but i wouldn't worry about that.

Edited by chiantiglace (log)

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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