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NoNiceTime

Royal Trumpet Mushrooms

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YAY!!!! I dry saute them with a little salt in a hot pan then when they are nicely cooked add some unsalted butter and a shot of garlic

cracked pepper and that is it

simple but with mushrooms simple is best I tihnk


why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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We call them king oysters here but many call them eryngii as well.

These are among my favourite and I agree with hummingbirdkiss: the best way to cook them, is simply to slice them lenghtwise and saute them (ideally in butter). This maximize the great texture of these mushrooms.

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The fresh ones I've cooked with (sold under the name of king oyster mushrooms or eryngii mushrooms) have been a bit more tough-textured than other shrooms I've worked with. That might be a function of size--the ones I buy, from the local Asian markets, are huge--stems at least the length of my hand and an inch or more in diameter. So while I've enjoyed them various ways, I've had my best results with these guys by cutting them into cubes and simmering them, alone or added to a stewed/braised dish. They hold up to such treatment really well.

If the shrooms you've got are smaller, they may well be more tender than mine.

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i wonder how they would respond to the butter-soy treatment discussed on another thread? i think i saw these at my costco last week...might have to try it!


"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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They were doing a demonstration & sampling at my Korean market a couple weeks ago. She sliced them against the grain into slices maybe half a domino size and sauteed in a light oil. Offered soy and wasabi (separately) as a dip. I could have made a meal of them. I have seen them sliced down their length in 1/8" slices and grilled, then dipped in hot bean paste. Going to try that next. I also like them sliced across the grain and dry- sauteed with a ton of garlic and then tossed into a kabocha and greens soup- on the lunch menu tomorrow. the soy butter idea from chezcherie sounds good too.

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I was way into grilling/broiling them for a good while, and then I had a few batches in a row that were unpleasantly tough-textured and it sort of put me off that preparation fo a while. Obviously I need to give it another go.

Cutting across the grain--d'oh! Why didn't I think of that? :laugh:

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