Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Konro Tabletop Charcoal Barbecue


Daniel
 Share

Recommended Posts

I mean, I have made 4 whole tenderloins on cast irons in my kitchen with the fan on.. The charcoal I would be using is the Japanese White Charcoal which burns very clean.. I have high ceilings in my apartment.. I too have used similar devices in restaurants without a hood..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd use it outdoors but I've seen these used indoors in restaurants (on tables as opposed to under a hood).

I am with you in this...I've seen this used indoors and wondering about smoke detectors if inside the house...what about when the food is cooking...it will sure bring out smoke, won't it? A portable like that will be nice and free up the barbeque space in my stove for other cooking...and I do not live in an apartment, so that will be nice...provided my smoke detector doesn't complain... :rolleyes:

Life is short: Break the rules...Forgive quickly...Kiss slowly...Love truly...Laugh uncontrollably...And never regret anything that made you smile. Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we should dance...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I spotted these on Shola's blog, but couldn't find one in the UK. Please post photo's if you get one. Studiokitchen

Edited by adey73 (log)

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On your stove top with the fan on, maybe.

You would also have to check the terms of your lease. You do want to be cooking out door because the landlord thought you were trying to burn the place down.

I would love to have one of these to use outside. I hear the heat they do a great job.

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Korin had some clean burning charcoal for sale too.  It says virtually smoke free but it's my understanding the fumes generated by the charcoal are still dangerous.  Though I have been known to be wrong...........from time to time.

You are 100% correct! Carbon monoxide is odorless, colorless and can be found in very high concentrations with absolutely NO visible smoke.

It also concentrates at lower levels in an enclosure than the lighter, visible smoke so staying near the floor is not exactly the wisest move. Multiple open windows as well as a very efficient fan would be required.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know anyone in Japan who would ever use one of those indoors. But I think if you have enough windows open, and a good fan, you should give it a try and report back. If it doesn't work as well as expected, it would still make a nice decorative item if you don't have a patio or balcony on which to use it.

And if we don't hear from you again, we'll know why...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The website for it DOES say it's for the patio. Which is generally outdoors unless you have areally weird house.

"Alternatively, marry a good man or woman, have plenty of children, and train them to do it while you drink a glass of wine and grow a moustache." -Moby Pomerance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't tell you how many stories there are about migrant farm workers staying warm in a trailer/camper by using a charcoal fired bbq, and ending up a coroner's statistic. I would vote never used indoors.

"I drink to make other people interesting".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slower shorter people make a good canary when it comes to CO.

I have one of these and the smaller ceramic Konro. I tried using the smaller one without hood but did not like even the minimal amount of smoke it put out even with the korin charcoal.

If I use them indoors now it is on the stove top with the hood on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With 100% combustion you get CO2(Carbon Dioxide) and H2O(Water). Even binchon charcoal does not have 100% combustion no matter how your percieve its burning. CO2 will kill you if it displaces the O2(Oxygen) content in an enclosed space.

Anyone that uses or advocates the use of such a device indoors had best visit thier local Fire Department and have them explain the local Fire Codes and dangers inherent in burning indoors.

The Korean restaurants that use charcoal tableside have large hoods and large fans removing the products of combustion.-Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They always, always have better ventilation systems to support the use of these than you have at home.

Really old Japanese homes with the thatched roofs and extremely high ceilings used irouri indoors (a sort of sand-pit equivalent), but they were drafty places. No restaurant without adequate ventilation will use these at the table in Japan, but there are some very clever interior designers that can obscure the ventilation work.

Of course you can use this indoors. Have you guys ever been to a restaurant that used these?

Edited by JasonTrue (log)

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...