Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Homemade Artisan Nutella


schneich
 Share

Recommended Posts

hi,

we really would like to do our own "nutella" spread. i tasted quite a few very good ones including the stuff from slitti and guido gobbino. what i didnt find is a reasonable recipe to make my own. the recipe from wybauw is basically just praline with a tiny little bit of chocolate. other recipes ask for ground hazelnuts. what i would like is a recipe that uses praline as a basis, but has a lot more chocolate in it. when i use more chocolate on the wybauw recipe things get solid. whe i add some oil things get unpleasantly oily, nothing like the creamy texture of nutella :angry:

help is appreciated

cheers from cologne

schneich

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just did some Google on your topic, and found that Nutella is a lot like our US Peanut butter.

Hazelnut paste & oil, skim milk, and cocoa powder( which gives the chocolate flavor, but not the solids) which would keep it spreadable and LOTS of sugar, which i would think makes the shelf life. Hope that helps

Eric

Link to comment
Share on other sites

on the same site i found this recipe

Chocolate-Hazelnut Spread (easy version)

Yield: about 12 ounces (1 1/2 cups)

2 cups whole raw hazelnuts

1 cup powdered sugar

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

up to 1/4 cup vegetable or nut oil

1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place hazelnuts in a single layer on a shallow baking pan. Toast until the skins are almost black and the meat is dark brown, about 15 minutes. Stir the nuts halfway through baking to ensure an even color.

Since the skin is bitter, you’ll want to discard them. Wrap the cooled hazelnuts in a clean kitchen towel or paper towel, and rub until most of the skins have come off. Don’t fret if you can’t get off all the skins.

Process nuts in a food processor, scraping down the sides of the bowl occasionally, until they have liquefied, about 5 minutes. First, you will get coarsely chopped nuts, then a fine meal. After a little while, the nuts will form a ball around the blade, and it will seem like you only have a solid mass. Keep processing. The heat and friction will extract the natural oils, and you will get hazelnut butter!

When the nuts are liquified, add in the sugar, cocoa and vanilla. Slowly drizzle in enough oil to make a spreadable consistency. Since the mixture is warm, it will be more fluid now than at room temperature.

Transfer the spread to an airtight container, and store in the refrigerator for1-2 months. For best results, stir the chocolate-hazelnut spread before using.

Perhaps a good place to start from.

Eric

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes iam adding hazelnut oil, that makes the whole thing pretty oily...

i also would love to start from praline, since i dont have a mill to get anything to Mµ size. these are the usual recipes if you google a bit, what iam after is a tried and true recipe, creamy and shelf stable. are milkpowder particles already small enough and/or soluble ??

cheers

t.

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At my recent Belgian class - the chef Steph - made a version that was very nice.

The recipe is in french, but I think this is an adequate translation

230 grams cream

100 grams bittersweet chocolate

200 grams milk chocolate

250 grams 'sucre fondant' which I assume means fondant

100 grams honey

120 grams praline noisette 50

Boil cream 2 minutes, cool to 60º C then mix with fondant. Cool to 40º C then add honey and tempered chocolates and praline. Keep in fridge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kerry-so kind of you to share! Do you have any shelf life info? I assume 2-3 weeks?

Thanks!

I suspect longer with all that sugar - but no numbers unfortunately.

The only question I have is whether the sucre fondant might be icing sugar. I'll see if I can find out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

Kerry,

did you ever find out if it was icing sugar?

Sucre fondant = Sucre à glacer = Sucre en poudre = confectioner's sugar

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...