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Welcome to the China Cooking forum, where we discuss all cooking and sourcing related topics specific to China for the benefit of both residents and visitors to the region. In this forum, you'll find topics about recipes, preparations, local markets, sourcing, farming and regional ingredients found in China.

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China Cooking Forum Index

This index has been created to assist you in finding common questions and topics. As you use this tool, please feel free to report any problems or suggestions to make it more efficient and usable. Likewise, if you feel a topic should be added, simply PM any of the Regional Forum hosts and we will review the topic for inclusion.

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eG Forums Events Calendar

We're looking for food-themed events in China to post in the Calendar.

  • Charity events for food-related causes
  • Large cook-offs and contests
  • Restaurant weeks, classes, and specials
  • Professional conferences
  • Wine, cheese, chocolate, and other tastings
  • State fairs, farmers markets, and other agricultural events

Let's fill up the Calendar with your favorite food events! If you have an event to suggest, please contact any Regional Forums host by PM or email.

To create a complete listing, please include the following information:

    1. Title of the Event
    2. Starting Date
    3. Last Day (if a more than one day event)
    4. URL(s) if applicable.
    5. Price of admission (if any)
    6. Open to the public or any restrictions
    7. Summary description of the event

Thanks!

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