Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

Well? U.S. Thanksgiving is next week. Anyone ready to bust out/show their efforts?  The best I did this year was olive oil spice cake - no fruit. Maybe I'll try one with craisins and call it Pandemic fcake? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I dug in deep this year. I made the NYT "Good Fruitcake" sourcing each ingredient with the best I could find (meaning the best candied cherries, pineapple, etc). Right now It's wrapped with cheesecloth and dotted with bay leaves - something I stole from (If I remember correctly) Collin Street Bakery.

PXL_20201116_185353578.thumb.jpg.ad3aeecd11010c527b90ec746b904465.jpg

 

But the other funny thing that happened is that my posts on social media (bizarrely) led to random strangers sending me money, so I've now bought 10 different fruitcakes that I'll be trying out next week. Since I now have a Patreon of Fruitcakes, I posted this ad this morning to thank them.

1386207759_fruitcakebenefactors(1).thumb.png.b172deb8f6a44df1b132573c8d338e7e.png

For the record, I think this is funny and ludicrous :)

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

I dug in deep this year. I made the NYT "Good Fruitcake" sourcing each ingredient with the best I could find (meaning the best candied cherries, pineapple, etc). Right now It's wrapped with cheesecloth and dotted with bay leaves - something I stole from (If I remember correctly) Collin Street Bakery.

PXL_20201116_185353578.thumb.jpg.ad3aeecd11010c527b90ec746b904465.jpg

 

But the other funny thing that happened is that my posts on social media (bizarrely) led to random strangers sending me money, so I've now bought 10 different fruitcakes that I'll be trying out next week. Since I now have a Patreon of Fruitcakes, I posted this ad this morning to thank them.

1386207759_fruitcakebenefactors(1).thumb.png.b172deb8f6a44df1b132573c8d338e7e.png

For the record, I think this is funny and ludicrous :)

 

That is great. Giggles are good in troubled times. The bay leaf thing reminds me of a bit in one of Marlena de Blasi's wonderful books where she saw the locals alternately threading bay leaves and figs to dry. Similar flavor band? Maybe in Umbria?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you on the edge of your seats, here are the ones I tried:

Assumption Abbey, Ava, MO

Gethsemani, Trappist, KY

Sisters of St. Benedict, Ferdinand, IN

My own from the NYT, Good Fruitcake recipe

June Taylor Company, Berkeley, CA

Frog Hollow, Brentwood, CA

Abbot's Table, Conyers, GA

Date Lady, Springfield, MO

FruitcakeUnboxing.thumb.jpg.dd7e33845f115a2dbdbdc7a71551294f.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

For those of you on the edge of your seats, here are the ones I tried:

And?

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gfron1 said:

For those of you on the edge of your seats, here are the ones I tried:

Assumption Abbey, Ava, MO

Gethsemani, Trappist, KY

Sisters of St. Benedict, Ferdinand, IN

My own from the NYT, Good Fruitcake recipe

June Taylor Company, Berkeley, CA

Frog Hollow, Brentwood, CA

Abbot's Table, Conyers, GA

Date Lady, Springfield, MO

FruitcakeUnboxing.thumb.jpg.dd7e33845f115a2dbdbdc7a71551294f.jpg

 

The only fruitcake I have made was from the NY Times recipe.  To my taste the texture was ruined by fig seeds.  If I ever make fruitcake again* I'd probably use the NY Times recipe but omit the dried figs.

 

 

*which is by no means assured.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The only fruitcake I have made was from the NY Times recipe.  To my taste the texture was ruined by fig seeds.  If I ever make fruitcake again* I'd probably use the NY Times recipe but omit the dried figs.

 

*which is by no means assured.

I agree, and I bought the fancy french plums and some seed shards made it in so now I'm eating at my own peril. I would likely just just regular American ones next time.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/25/2020 at 4:40 PM, gfron1 said:

Frog Hollow, Brentwood, CA

That's where I live -Frogs Hollow is a regular at the Santa Monica farmers market and well known grower among chefs for there fantastic fruit especially peaches and stone fruit.

 

Looks like a great list also curious how the June Taylor stacks up since she is also well know for her jams -one would think she has access to the best Northern California fruit.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

A new fruitcake recipe I crafted this year, the Tropical Fruitcake.  This started with a fruitcake recipe that appeared in "FOODday" in the Portland Oregonian on October 6, 1992.  There were a series of different recipes, but this one caught my eye since it used dried fruits rather than the candied fruits we find in the markets this time of year.  My regular fruitcake recipe will be on the list for this week, but I've gotten behind.  My Great Aunt Bertie taught me that her best fruitcakes were aged for at least 5 years and I even think she had one at 10 years.  I tend to make one for this season to eat now, then another one to age during the year.  But in recent years I haven't resisted temptation and I've eaten the darn fruitcake in July, so haven't had a nice aged one to fall back on during the holidays.

 

The dried fruits make this a really moist and delicious fruitcake, and I didn't add molasses like I do for my regular cakes so it doesn't have the dark color.  Just delicious, and it will be better in a month after more glogs of rum.

Tropical Fruitcake.JPG

 

A Slice of Tropical Fruitcake.JPG

 

1 1/3 cups light brown sugar

1 cup softened butter

6 large eggs

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. cinnamon

1/2 tsp. mace

1/2 tsp. ground cloves

1 1/2 cups golden raisins

1 cup chopped dried papaya

1 cup chopped dried mango

1 cup chopped dried pineapple

1/3 cup chopped dried, candied ginger

1 cup chopped macadamia nuts

1 cup chopped pistachios

3/4 cup dark rum, divided

 

Preheat the oven to 300. Spray the bundt cake pan with cooking spray with flour.

 

In a mixer add the brown sugar, butter and eggs and beat to combine. In a separate bowl, add the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, mace and cloves and mix to combine. With the mixer running, add the flour mixture to the butter mixture and beat to combine. Spoon the batter in a large bowl.

 

Add the raisins, papaya, mango, pineapple, ginger, macadamia nuts, pistachios and 1/2 cup of the rum to the batter mixture. Stir the mixture by hand to combine the fruits, nuts and batter. Stir in the 1/2 cup of dark rum.

Spread the batter in the bundt cake pans up to 1" from the top of the pan. Place each bundt cake pan in a large roasting pan. Fill the roasting pan with up to 2" of water. The water helps create steam during baking to keep the fruitcake moist.

 

Bake the fruitcakes for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Bring the fruitcakes out of the oven and let cool on a rack for 10 minutes, then invert onto a rack to cool. Let the fruitcakes cool completely, then spoon the rum over the top.

 

Store the fruitcakes in a large plastic container, covered, in a cool, dark place. Spoon rum over the fruitcake once a week until serving.

If you're storing the fruitcakes during the year, wrap them in cheesecloth and tie with cotton string. Store in a large plastic container, covered, in a cool, dark place. Spoon rum over the cheesecloth once every two to three months during the year. The fruitcakes will keep for over a year.

 

This recipe makes enough fruitcake batter for two 9" bundt cake pans.  You can cut the recipe in half for one fruitcake.  Freeze any leftover batter and make fruitcake muffins or fruitcake loaves.

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/27/2020 at 9:58 AM, David Ross said:

The dried fruits make this a really moist and delicious fruitcake, and I didn't add molasses like I do for my regular cakes so it doesn't have the dark color.  Just delicious, and it will be better in a month after more glogs of rum.

Tropical Fruitcake.JPG

 

A Slice of Tropical Fruitcake.JPG

 

 

Certainly pretty. Has that stained glass look. Were your dried fruits quite pliable or did you plump thm in some way? - like @andiesenji has mentioned steaming candied ones I think.  The cut view looks so moist it is coming apart a bit. Would you increase batter ratio or was it good to you? The mentioned water in the under-pan is interesting. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, heidih said:

Certainly pretty. Has that stained glass look. Were your dried fruits quite pliable or did you plump thm in some way? - like @andiesenji has mentioned steaming candied ones I think.  The cut view looks so moist it is coming apart a bit. Would you increase batter ratio or was it good to you? The mentioned water in the under-pan is interesting. 

The fruits were just dried, I didn't soak them ahead or plump them at all.  I buy them in bulk and so they aren't overly expensive, and just naturally dried that concentrates flavors and sugars.  The batter ratio was just right for me, and my fruitcakes do typically tend to fall apart but that's never been intentional, although I enjoy the texture.  The baking in a water bath came from the newspaper recipe I started with, and I think it may keep the fruitcake a little more moist while baking.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking at it from my dark fruitcake Carib style which is far from a "door stop" but we could slice with a serrated knife quite thinly as it is intense. Your lighter style looks delightful - plus as I noted - festively colorful. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I start the baking of the fruitcake recipe I've used for years.  It comes from the Great Northern Railroad who every holiday season served fruitcakes onboard their passenger trains, most notably the Empire Builder.  Passengers could actually buy fruitcakes at ticket offices and onboard the trains. What a different world.  It's more the traditional style rather than the tropical fruitcake I posted earlier.  The tropical fruitcake used dried fruits and this one, the "train" version uses the traditional candied fruits.  

Empire Builder.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it's because I got behind in recent years with my fruitcake stocks, so I've been on the binge so far this season.  The tropical fruitcake was a new entry into the fruitcake stocks, and it's been delicious.  And social distancing has done something unusual, I've found how many of my friends love, and want, a fruitcake, so I've been making them fruitcakes in exchange for treats.  All done by leaving goodie bags at the back door.  Here are three using my traditional recipe from the Great Northern Railroad.  I add some brown sugar to the recipe to get the cake a little darker, and other than that it's pretty much the same as the original, but you can vary it to your liking. These won't be eaten this year but age for at least one, maybe go to about 5 years with the brandy fruitcake.

Fruitcake 2020 #1.JPG

 

Fruitcake 2020 #2.JPG

 

  • Like 7
  • Delicious 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/25/2020 at 3:39 PM, gfron1 said:

Still lots to digest (literally and figuratively), but I just finished my ingredient analysis which I can share tonight:

FruitcakeIngredients.docx 92.09 kB · 21 downloads

@gfron1, when you have the time, I'd be interested to know which one(s) of those fruitcakes you liked. I've always been curious about stuff made in the monasteries, like fruitcakes and fudge.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MokaPot said:

@gfron1, when you have the time, I'd be interested to know which one(s) of those fruitcakes you liked. I've always been curious about stuff made in the monasteries, like fruitcakes and fudge.

One of the best fruitcakes I ever had was made by the Monks at the Monastery at Mt. Angel in the Williamette Valley of Oregon.  We lived in Salem and used to drive thru there every Sunday to visit friends that had a horse farm.  The monks also made delicious fudge and penuche.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, David Ross said:

One of the best fruitcakes I ever had was made by the Monks at the Monastery at Mt. Angel in the Williamette Valley of Oregon.  We lived in Salem and used to drive thru there every Sunday to visit friends that had a horse farm.  The monks also made delicious fudge and penuche.

As some enjoy cheddar cheese with apple pie, I think some of Sister Noella's respected cheese from the Abbey of Regina Laudis  might pair nicely. Seriously - anyone enjoy cheese w/ fruitcake?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, heidih said:

As some enjoy cheddar cheese with apple pie, I think some of Sister Noella's respected cheese from the Abbey of Regina Laudis  might pair nicely. Seriously - anyone enjoy cheese w/ fruitcake?

I never thought of that but I would try it, might be delicious.

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, David Ross said:

One of the best fruitcakes I ever had was made by the Monks at the Monastery at Mt. Angel in the Williamette Valley of Oregon.  We lived in Salem and used to drive thru there every Sunday to visit friends that had a horse farm.  The monks also made delicious fudge and penuche.

 

@David Ross, I went on the website and they do have a marketplace. Unfortunately, no fruitcakes and fudge!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/11/2020 at 9:26 AM, David Ross said:

I guess it's because I got behind in recent years with my fruitcake stocks, so I've been on the binge so far this season.  The tropical fruitcake was a new entry into the fruitcake stocks, and it's been delicious.  And social distancing has done something unusual, I've found how many of my friends love, and want, a fruitcake, so I've been making them fruitcakes in exchange for treats.  All done by leaving goodie bags at the back door.  Here are three using my traditional recipe from the Great Northern Railroad.  I add some brown sugar to the recipe to get the cake a little darker, and other than that it's pretty much the same as the original, but you can vary it to your liking. These won't be eaten this year but age for at least one, maybe go to about 5 years with the brandy fruitcake.

Fruitcake 2020 #1.JPG

 

Fruitcake 2020 #2.JPG

 

Amazing! Gobsmacked over your output and the fruitcakes' longevity. I'm going to crawl back into bed for a nap now.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/11/2020 at 3:53 PM, MokaPot said:

@gfron1, when you have the time, I'd be interested to know which one(s) of those fruitcakes you liked. I've always been curious about stuff made in the monasteries, like fruitcakes and fudge.

I never circled back to share the video I made: HERE ON YOUTUBE

And here is my list. Note that just because it's on the list doesn't mean I particularly enjoyed it. Details are in the video.

final.thumb.png.947282ad242824657f3d074e3776aff6.png

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By MightyD
      cakes, cookies, pies, that makes you smile!!!!
    • By meryll_thirteen
      Hi guys! I got excited to post something as this is my first one.
      So, the top 3 desserts I like to eat when I was still in Philippines were Halu-halo (literally means mix-mix in english), brazo de mercedes and chocolate crinkles.

      1. HALU-HALO is one of the popular food during summer. This is basically:
      shaved ice with evaporated milk,
      sugar,
      and the following:
      - nata de coco (coconut cream based on a google search, these are cube-like jellies),
      - sweetened red beans,
      - sweetened bananas,
      - cooked sago or tapioca,
      - ube or purple yam,
      - leche flan (this is also one of the best desserts to eat),
      - macapuno (made of coconut),
      - sweetend jackfruit,
      - sweetened kamote (this is similar to sweet potato but caramelized),
      - sweetened kaong (sugar palm fruit)
      - and topped with a scoop of ice cream.
      These fruits are usually bought in jars (found mostly in Asian grocery stores). You basically put the fruits at the bottom, add sugar (if you want because almost all the fruits are sweetened so it's already sweet), then you fill the cup/bowl with shaved ice and add milk. And most importantly, mix it well before you eat because you don't want to eat shaved ice with milk only and then eat the really sweet fruits last.

      2. BRAZO DE MERCEDES
      Yah, I think the name is Spanish? I tried making this but I just failed. It's kinda hard to do and takes a lot of patience but it's really worth it. This is my favourite cake! In Philippines, most bakeries sell this but my favourite is from Goldiluck's which is located in shopping malls.
      Brazo de Mercedes recipe

      3. CHOCOLATE CRINKLES
      These are my favourite chocolate cookies! I think this one isn't really from Philippines but they are really popular. I was kinda shocked when I came here in Canada, because they don't sell these cookies in the bakeries I've been to so I tried baking these on my own. Since my post is getting long, I'll put the recipe as a link at the bottom.
      http://sweb2.dmit.na...rinkles-recipe/
      I hope you enjoyed my post! Happy eating and baking everyone!
    • By ChrisZ
      Hoping for some help.  I accidentally melted an old mould that is very important to us and I've had no luck searching around for a replacement.  
      If anyone knows where I could buy one - or even has one to spare they would be willing to sell - please send me a message.
      The mould (label attached below) was originally labelled as "Easy as ABC gelatin mould", although we just call it the alphabet mould.  Yes there are lots of alphabet moulds around, including new silicone ones, but we need the specific designs on this one to replace the one I damaged.  Depending on the cost, I would consider paying for postage internationally (to Australia).
      Thanks in advance!

    • By Kasia
      ON THE CHRISTMAS TABLE - CHRISTMAS EVE CRANBERRY KISSEL
       
      One of my friends from Ukraine told me about her traditional Christmas dishes. Except for stuffed cabbage with potatoes (which I have made already) I was surprised about cranberry kissel. I searched the Internet and I saw that in many Polish homes Christmas Eve supper ends with cranberry kissel. In my home we always drink compote with dried fruit, but maybe this year we will try a new dish on our Christmas menu.

      I wonder why cranberries are on the Christmas table. I didn't find any particular information about it (except the fact it is tradition). I think that a few years ago cranberries were treated as a natural cure which aids digestion, and this could be quite useful after a hefty Christmas meal!

      At my Ukrainian friends' home Christmas kissel is runny like a drink, but you can prepare it like a dessert with a more dense texture. I made the drink version, but you should choose which is better for you.

      Ingredients:
      500g of cranberries
      a piece of cinnamon and a couple of cloves
      6-8 tablespoons of sugar
      2-3 tablespoons of potato flour

      Wash the cranberries and put them with the cinnamon and cloves in a pan. Pour in 500ml of water and boil until the fruit is soft. Remove the cinnamon and cloves and blend the rest. Add the sugar and mix it until it has dissolved. Sieve the cranberry mousse to make a smooth texture. Mix the potato flour with a bit of cold water. Boil the cranberry mousse and add the mixed potato flour, stirring constantly so it is not lumpy. Boil for a while. Pour the kissel into some glasses.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      CRANBERRY-APPLE CAKE
       
      The worst thing about my cranberry-apple cake is the way it looks. It didn't look impressive, but it was so yummy it disappeared from the baking pan before it had completely cooled down. My children said that it was a colourful apple pie, and it really was something like that. Apples with cinnamon are the basis of apple pie – one of my favourite cakes. However, the sour cranberries make it more fresh and interesting. The crumble topping was, for my son, the most important part of the cake. I had to drive him away, because otherwise the cake would have been deprived of its crunchy top.

      Ingredients (18×26cm cake tin ):
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 eggs
      1 packet of powdered vanilla blancmange
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      200g of sugar
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      pinch of salt
      fruit
      250g of fresh cranberries
      1 apple
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      crumble topping
      5 tablespoons of brown sugar
      100g of butter
      150g of flour
       
      First make the crumble topping. Put the cool butter, flour and sugar in a bowl. Knead them until you have small lumps. Leave it in the fridge.
      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a cake tin with some baking paper.
      Mix the flour with the baking powder and salt. Cream the butter with the sugar. Add egg after egg to the butter, stirring constantly. Add the flour, vanilla essence and powdered vanilla blancmange. Mix it together until you have a smooth dough. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the apple, remove the apple core and cube it. Mix the cranberries, apple, sugar and cinnamon in a bowl. Put the fruit on top of the dough. Cover the fruit with the crumble topping. Bake for 50 minutes.

      Enjoy your meal!

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...