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Suvir Saran

The Fruitcake Topic

428 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, IowaDee said:

Don't people use nails for the same purpose in baked potatoes?  Almost sure I have even seen packages of so called "baking nails" in a Mennonite store near here.  I shall check next time we are there.

Or you could just order them here. :D

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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Well that nailed it for sure..I always thought the Amish and Mennonite ladies just used left overs from barn raisings.  They are nothing if not thrifty

 

 

 

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16 hours ago, IowaDee said:

Don't people use nails for the same purpose in baked potatoes?  Almost sure I have even seen packages of so called "baking nails" in a Mennonite store near here.  I shall check next time we are there.

Yes.  And I have a giant aluminum "Texas tack"  actually supposed to be a tent peg, that I place in the center of stuffing when I put it into a bird.  It is extremely efficient at transferring heat right into the center of the stuffing so it cooks in the center and in fact, gets really crusty around the insert.  

I nuke my baked potatoes now and finish them in a hot oven so have no need for the nails but I still have them.  

It seemed so funny that Connie would recall something Aunt Maude said, when I, with my "great" memory for things like that, had so throughly forgotten it.  In fact, I barely remembered the visit.  It came at a time when I was going through a divorce and trying to work things out with my ex - he asked me to keep his daughter, who he did not want to go with him and who was just 15.  He was worried she would get pushed into the foster care system.  Aunt Maude stayed a month and to me it is mostly a blur.

I did get her to write down some recipes in a little book that I still have but haven't opened for years.  Now I have to find it.

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