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Suvir Saran

Blondies

34 posts in this topic

Those blondies are trouble, I tell ya, trouble.

:laugh::huh::blink:


Sometimes When You Are Right, You Can Still Be Wrong. ~De La Vega

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Barron's sides with the blondie = butterscotch brownie position.

But of course I'm right and Barron's is wrong, as usual.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Suvir:

I'm sure there are blondie variations all over the country/world (the Canadian version sounds interesting!) but in my book, the cake of the blondie should simply be overwhelmingly buttery and brown sugary with big chunks of pecans and chocolate.

Try this one:

Unsalted Butter, softened 1/2 cup (4 oz.)

Light brown sugar 1 cup (7.66 oz.)

Egg, large 1

Vanilla extract 1 1/2 tsp.

Unbleached a/p flour 1 cup (5 oz.)

Baking powder 1/2 tsp.

Baking soda 1/4 tsp.

Pecans, toasted, chopped 1 cup (4 oz.)

Semi(or bitter)-sweet choc chips 1 cup (6 oz.)

Spray (or butter) 8" square pan and line with foil (foil must come up and over sides). Spray (or butter) foil. Preheat oven to 350.

Combine flour, baking powder and baking soda.

Cream butter and sugar. Add egg and vanilla and beat until light in color and fluffy. Add dry ingredients and mix briefly to combine. Stir in nuts and chocolate. Batter will be very thick. Spread gently into pan so as not to tear foil.

Bake exactly 30 minutes. Cool completely in pan then lift out by overhanging foil.


kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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My blondie recipe is similar to those above, but has the chocolate chunks and pecans sprinkled over the top rather than mixed through the batter. I make blondies about once a fortnight, they keep quite well and the kids love them in their lunch boxes. Less expensive to make than a really good brownie.

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Fat Guy..this is your chance to show that you are a Real Man and say you're wrong. Barron's is right. We'll still respect you.

Canucks all over....is this the time to educate our gringo friends about Butter tarts, or is that a major thread of its own?


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

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margaretmcarthur.com

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Canucks all over....is this the time to educate our gringo friends about Butter tarts, or is that a major thread of its own?

Could that be the same thing as a banburry (sp?) tart. That too is nothing but a butter tart with a fancy name. English in origin. We had it in India as kids. It certainly would deserve it's own thread either way.

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I agree. Not that there are official definitions in this regard, but to me a white chocolate "brownie" (dare I ask what it should be called . . . ) does not qualify as a blondie. In a brownie the chocolate permeates the entire thing. In a blondie the chocolate should be in chip or chunk form surrounded by cookie-ish dough.

So when can we expect the definitive taxonomy of brownies and bar cookies? Alice Medrich puts them in the same chapter. :wink:

What does one call these things made with white chocolate? Brownies hardly seems appropriate after all. Why can't "blondie" simply refer to brownies without the chocolate?

And whatever you want to call these things, they're good. :raz: 7 oz of melted white chocolate and 5 oz of coarsely chopped along with macadamia nuts. If you like white chocolate chip macadamia nut cookies, then you'll like these things too.

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What does one call these things made with white chocolate?  Brownies hardly seems appropriate after all.

You're not going to get me to say it.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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What does one call these things made with white chocolate?  Brownies hardly seems appropriate after all.

You're not going to get me to say it.

I'd say it, but I'm only half which makes it, uh, inappropriate. :laugh:

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