• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
smallworld

eG Foodblog: smallworld - Spring in Tokyo

207 posts in this topic

From the rosy blossoms to the artist's palette of shades-of-pink fish to the glowing strawberries to their kin on the cake---this is just a jewel-box scattered down the screen.

Though I cannot understand how on Earth you took his mere word for how good that chocolate mousse was :raz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Btw, I used to think I loved California Strawberries, but Ontario strawberries rock!!  They're so juicy and sweet( but a bit small).  I made the most kick arse strawberry jam last year, I wish I could remember the recipe.    I'll take an Ontario strawberry over a US strawberry any day!!

Oh god, don't get me going about American commercial strawberries. Surreally large lumps of vaguely berry-flavored cellulose. Even when I've bought them at a farmer's market or a U-pick farm, all I get is slighly fresher, slightly more flavorful lumps of cellulose. And the goofiest thing of all is that I keep buying 'em. :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So do you not eat sushi?

Alas, no, though I long to do so. Too much childhood exposure to the grim ins and outs of the cleaning process, I think, though I did have a pang of regret for the older couple next door whose subsistence seemed predicated two or three days a week on his perpetual fishing forays.

But I can make a bowl of tuna salad and eat it all myself twixt two noons---its pink canned-ness puts it at a remove, somehow, from a creature of the deep.

I DO fear I would have one small problem with the days-of-the-week sorting of the garbage---I save every big plastic Folger's coffee container against the day of glass breakage---I've even been known to smash the pieces even smaller to make them fit safely into the container, so as not to have a nasty surprise poking through the bag.


Edited by racheld (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A minor earthquake woke me up at 6:15 this morning. Luckily it was small enough that it had stopped by the time I was fully awake, because I've become quite frightened of tremors and usually take a long time to calm down after one hits.

gallery_7940_5772_33329.jpg

Last night we skipped dinner and went straight to the snack fest. We started with the Sakura-shio (cherry blossom salt) flavoured potato chips, which are a kigen gentei (seasonal, limited time only) product. They tasted of salt with only a slight whiff of sakura fragrance-- not bad, but if we'd wanted plain chips we would have bought them. The Ume-katsuo flavoured chips (forgot to take a picture but I posted a photo of the package yesterday) were way better and had great ume (pickled plum) and katsuobushi (bonito flakes): smoky, salty and sour. We will try to grab these again before they disappear.

On the right is Fransu-pan Koubou (baguette workshop?), which is a chip-like snack made of very thinly sliced french bread baked until crispy. This one is caramel flavoured and was good with an excellent texture but just a bit blah-- not sweet enough to be a sweet, not salty enough to be a chip. I'd like to try the other flavours: sugar, butter, and garlic butter.

gallery_7940_5772_10715.jpg

These are deep-fried chili peppers with peanuts. Pretty damn hot, though my tolerance for spice has gone way down since coming to Japan. The name of the product is "Cho unma", which is supposedly what the Hangul characters mean, but this product is made in China and the name sounds suspiciously close to the Japanese expression for "crazy delicious". Do these actually exist in Korea or elsewhere? I don't really care, because they are indeed crazy delicious.

Beside it are peanut senbei. Senbei, or sembei, are often translated as "rice crackers" and indeed they are often just that, but can really be any kind of crisp Japanese style wafer/cracker/cookie type thing. These ones have cookkie-like ingredients and are light (as in lots of air bubbles) and very crisp, almot hard. There are many types of peanut senbei ranging from rock-hard to cookie-like but this brand is our favourite and we always have a package in the house.

gallery_7940_5772_5139.jpg

Now it's time to get to work on today's lunch. Two bento (lunch box) cookbooks, and a regular cookbook written by a student of mine (it's actually out to plan meals for next week, not today). I made bento for my husband's lunch for a brief period after we got married, but they generated so much interest among his coworkers that he eventually asked me to stop. They would all hover around him when he opened his lunch and inspect my handiwork, amazed that his new foreign bride could actually cook. My husband just couldn't take the scrutiny. Making his lunch had been a real money saver and was great for helping me learn Japanese cooking but I was relieved to quit doing it because it was a lot of work.

So it's been years and years since I regularly made bento and I am way out of practice.


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am also intrigued about Nattou - I have never heard of it before (not surprised thou, since i live in chicago and have never been too far from the United States (I cannot wait when I have the means to travel - some day...)

Can you describe the taste a little but more?

And - what I really want to know - what makes Nattou so healthy? The fact that it is beans )fiber, protein, etc) or the fact that it is fermented? And, anyhow - what about fermentation makes it healthy????

Signed, Bewildered and perplexed in Chi-town (lol)

P.S. I too, am LOVING your blog....I may not 'chime in' or 'comment' often, but boy am I following along :)

Nattou, or natto, tastes a taste that's hard to describe, but I think it's beany, nutty and cheesy. It also has a strong smell that is cheese-like in its stinkiness.

I'm a bit fuzzy on what exactly is healthy about it, but I think you're right that it's largely the fermentation, which apparently creates good-for-you enzymes and stuff. It's also because they are beans, especially soybeans, which are already healthy. And the slime is good too as sticky foods have something in them that's good for the blood. Sorry I can't be more specific, but I'll direct you to the natto thread for more info.

Okay, inquiring minds want to know: how does one get nattou into a deep-fryable form? Make little balls and coat them in panko, like a dumpling or croquette? (I understand that korokke are big in Japan ... )

Good question! This was a long time ago, before I knew anything about Japanese food, but I think Hiroyuki is right in that it was tempura: dipped in batter and deep-fried. Still no idea how the little nattou bundles were kept together while dipping and frying. The bundles did have a band of nori seaweed around them which might have helped a bit, but still. Can't be an easy food to deep-fry!

I wonder if the yunomi (tea cup) on the right of the photo (the one with a female face) is one of meoto jawan (tea cups for a married couple).  I think I used to have the same one as you have.

I didn't even know what a meoto jawan was until now! I bought this very early in my stay here, at the Tokyo station Daimaru. I remember going on a mad spree there, buying dishes and kitchen implements at random without really knowing what they were or that there were far cheaper place to buy them.

So this is a female? I usually give this to my husband to drink from, and apparently he doesn't know any better than I do! I think I'll keep my eyes open for a male partner so I can finally complete the set.


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gallery_7940_5772_79998.jpg

Time for cake, which we eat cake every few months or so. Any more often and we'd get too used to it, and cake is not a habit we need. The cakes and pastries here are just so amazingly good compared to those in North America. I didn't even like cake before I came here. I'm still really picky but have, for good or bad, found plenty to like here.

Whoa boy! (Screech!) You have my attention now.

Nice looking pastries. So when did a country known for jelly rolls become so proficient and enamored by high end pastries? Do you know any of the history?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for your description of that sushi restaurant.  I remember the thread on the restaurant that you started in the Japan Forum years ago.  I want to say something about hirame and other white fish and ama ebi.  No offense intended to the chef.  I think it's more appropriate to say that you can enjoy the chewy texture of white fish and ama ebi when they are fresh and then you can enjoy their taste the next day, when the protein is decomposed into amino acids.  And, I hear that Korean people prefer the chewy texture of hirame (correct me if I'm wrong).

Oh yeah, I remember that thread. I was just so shocked to hear that sushi wasn't just about super-fresh raw fish slapped onto rice, and had trouble understanding the meaning of "Edomae zushi".

The chef didn't actually talk about hirame yesterday, that was just my own observation. I do know that when I've tried the very fresh, chewy type of hirame I've wished it was less chewy but liked it nonetheless. But trying hirame yesterday I thought that I never want to eat the fresh kind again.

Maybe it's better to think of them as separate foods and enjoy them in them both in different ways.

That sounds like a good solution. Another possibility (a pricier one, unfortunately), is a thick end-grain cutting board on rubber legs. Chinese round cutting boards (the ones that look like a thick slice from a tree) are another possibility, but may be prone to splitting.

Great job, and I look forward to your last day!

ETA: Um, that didn't come out right. I look forward to today, not to the ending of the blog. You know what I mean.

That's a great idea and I'd love a proper end-grain cutting board (didn't know you could get rubber legs for them). The problem is that they are not easy to find here, too heavy to bring from home, and storage could be a problem. Or do people just leave them on the counter all the time? That's what my mother does, but I worry about keeping it clean that way.

What a weekend!

When you buy good ingredients and make something like shabu-shabu at home, exactly as you like it, do you think it makes you more reluctant to spend money on dining out?

I'm also surprised to find that somebody else thinks that otoro can be TOO fatty!

And your broad beans were a great find - certainly haven't seen any in the shops yet.

So how did you eat the fuki/ butterbur in the end? I agree with how much work they are - as much time to prepare the fuki as to prepare a whole separate meal, I'd guess :biggrin: .

I see you've got those "France-pan koubou" snacks (top left) in your photo. Did you like  them?

By the way, you can find "over-the-sink" chopping boards, but one that doesn't cover the entire sink is more useful - because you can sweep trimmings straight into one of those triangular waste-catchers.

About personal chopsticks - do you just toss the little bag in the laundry when you come home? I keep wondering if the INSIDE of my little chopstick bag is really clean!

As for the dilemma of the international couple...sigh.

I really do think certain foods are way better at home. It doesn't exactly make me reluctant to eat out, but it does mean that I tend to choose things that I can't/don't make at home. And I do like to splurge more on good ingredients than expensive restaurant meals.

The fuki will show up later today and I did like the France-pan koubou. I'd never seen it before and thought it was brand-new. Has it already showed up in your house?

I had to laugh at this: "do you just toss the little bag in the laundry when you come home?". If I did that I wouldn't see the bag again for weeks! Not having kids, and with a husband who wears a suit most of the week, laundry is not a daily thing for me. I just let it pile enough until there's enough for each type of load, and towels/linens (the category that the chopstick wrap belongs to) is the most infrequently washed.

So I only wash my chopstick wrap about once a month, at which time the chopsticks get a proper washing as well. I should probably do it more often but I only actually use them about once a week and at that time I'll wash them with water and a napkin or with an oshibori. Maybe not the most thorough cleaning, but hey- they're my own germs anyway! So you use "my hashi" as well? Do you ever get strange looks or comments? I've had restaurant workers who just didn't get it, and one even brought out a fancier pair of disposable chopsticks for me, thinking I was snubbing the cheap kind that were at the table.

Btw, I used to think I loved California Strawberries, but Ontario strawberries rock!!  They're so juicy and sweet( but a bit small).  I made the most kick arse strawberry jam last year, I wish I could remember the recipe.    I'll take an Ontario strawberry over a US strawberry any day!!

Oh god, don't get me going about American commercial strawberries. Surreally large lumps of vaguely berry-flavored cellulose. Even when I've bought them at a farmer's market or a U-pick farm, all I get is slighly fresher, slightly more flavorful lumps of cellulose. And the goofiest thing of all is that I keep buying 'em. :wacko:

So even actual Americans think their strawberries suck? I had kind of assumed that the imports we get from you had simply lost something on the journey and that they'd be good when they were fresh. Or that the tasteless ones are for export and you keep the good ones for yourselves.

Are there no good, locally grown berries in America at all?

I DO fear I would have one small problem with the days-of-the-week sorting of the garbage---I save every big plastic Folger's coffee container against the day of glass breakage---I've even been known to smash the pieces even smaller to make them fit safely into the container, so as not to have a nasty surprise poking through the bag.

Folgers comes in plastic??

Putting pieces of broken glass and ceramics into a sturdy container is actually what you're supposed to do here too. And then clearly mark the package with "kiken" (dangerous). As a world-class klutz, I'm kind of an expert in that department.


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whoa boy! (Screech!) You have my attention now.

Nice looking pastries. So when did a country known for jelly rolls become so proficient and enamored by high end pastries?  Do you know any of the history?

Jelly rolls? Ever since I've been here Japan has been enamored by high end pastries. I don't know how it compares to those of Europe but the stuff here is a million times better than back home in Canada. They look good, taste good, have a good (low) level of sweetness, and often reflect the seasons. The two we bought were actually among the plainest in the shop-- there were exotic flavours like yuzu and some very fanciful constructions. I don't know much about the history and am not hugely into cakes and desserts, but this thread in the Japan forum might be of interest to you.


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another American here who can't stand the American mass produced supermarket strawberries, they taste like cotton! I am sure there are good ones in the US somewhere...

I rarely buy strawberries here, maybe once or twice a season. With 5 people going at them we end up with 3 possibly 4 a piece.

Every couple of years my in-laws take us for an ichigo-gari (strawberry picking/eat on the spot) outing. We just went a couple weeks ago and I posted about it in the winter foods thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...dpost&p=1527820

There is nothing like eating strawberries fresh from the greenhouse! I can't stand refrigerated strawberries they are best eaten slightly warm from the sun.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I didn't even know what a meoto jawan was until now! I bought this very early in my stay here, at the Tokyo station Daimaru. I remember going on a mad spree there, buying dishes and kitchen implements at random without really knowing what they were or that there were far cheaper place to buy them.

So this is a female? I usually give this to my husband to drink from, and apparently he doesn't know any better than I do! I think I'll keep my eyes open for a male partner so I can finally complete the set.

Okame (female) and hyottoko (male) :biggrin:

As for France Pan Kobo, I learned how it was developed from a TV show, "Gacchiri Monday" a few months ago. The manufacturer that makes Baby Star Ramen wanted to make another hit, and tried pressing just about everything that could be pressed, and they found that french bread was good when pressed. The manufacturer even constructed a factory for the sole purpose of making french bread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So even actual Americans think their strawberries suck? I had kind of assumed that the imports we get from you had simply lost something on the journey and that they'd be good when they were fresh. Or that the tasteless ones are for export and you keep the good ones for yourselves.

Are there no good, locally grown berries in America at all?

Just lost my post- hope this does not double post...

I live in Southern California which produces a huge chunk of the U.S. crop. The California Strawberry Commission latest daily report shows 221,484 flats picked this last Thursday March 6th. Unfortunately most are the "durable", "shippable" ones that sometimes have a strawberry scent but have a watery taste and an odd texture.

I am blessed with several local farmer's markets where I can, for a very short time, get some lesser cultivated varieties that do not ship well, but taste wonderful. I am talking about farmer's with red tinted fingers from picking the berries that same morning.

Also I recently tried a tip to store them in a glass jar. They were lovely for a week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto~

the only place to get decent strawberries is from a farm stand/farmers market. NEVER the supermarket ! :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. American grocery store strawberries are abominable, nasty, tasteless things.

But, in a month or so the small fields in the Central Valley that are usually run by Vietnamese families and have a stand by the road will be ready. These are the most delicious, fragrant, bright red berries anyone would want.

These berries, obviously aren't shippable because they keep for only a couple of days at most. I can gobble up a whole basket before I drive the 40 miles home.

Very seasonal since they last only a couple of months. Then we look forward to the next season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So even actual Americans think their strawberries suck? I had kind of assumed that the imports we get from you had simply lost something on the journey and that they'd be good when they were fresh. Or that the tasteless ones are for export and you keep the good ones for yourselves.

Are there no good, locally grown berries in America at all?

Maryland farms have wonderful pick-your-own strawberries (click). Unfortunately, strawberries either taste good or ship well, but not both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_7940_5772_10715.jpg

I believe what the package says is Cho Un Mas. I have no idea what the heck that means and haven't seen that anywhere here in Korea.

BTW, great blog and such brilliantly colored pictures.


Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_7940_5772_48024.jpg

For breakfast, french toast, butter maple bananas, yogurt with strawberries.

gallery_7940_5772_8722.jpg

After breakfast my husband helped with the dishes and then took a turn in front of the stove. Both activities are fairly rare but he used to help out more when he worked at home. Here he is making amazake, a hot drink made of sake lees and flavoured with sugar and ginger. He wears a cap while cooking as a sort of hairnet and will probably kill me when he finds out I've uploaded this picture. Send help if you don't hear from me within three hours.

gallery_7940_5772_1314.jpg

While he made the amazake I gathered up the receipts for the week and updated my kakeibo (household budget book). This is the first year I'm doing this and I have no idea if I'm doing it right, as I can't really understand the instructions. So I'm just using it in a basic way to get a sense of how much we spend on stuff. Neither of us are very good with money and if you asked me how much, say, our monthly food bill or average electricity bill is I would have no idea. So hopefully this will help me understand our spending patterns and eventually point us to where we should start cutting back.


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to say thanks for the foodblog as a former expat I applaud you.


Jon

--formerly known as 6ppc--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that is one breakfast that I couldn't say "snap" to! Looks great.

And a guy making amazake...there's something very cute about that.

I seem to remember that Hiroyuki posted about the same type of peanut senbei you showed - and they're a favorite of my husband's, too. They always seem to be on the fuddy-duddy shelf of the snack corner, yet those who try them always seem to come back for more!

I just found those france-pan snacks recently (kids were home early studying for exams...). Haven't tried the caramel one you had, but the butter one seemed better than the sugar flavor, for your future reference!

If your kakeibo has made it as far as March, you're already an expert. I don't know why they don't just sell a "January-only" edition for those who know themselves!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gallery_7940_5772_10715.jpg

I believe what the package says is Cho Un Mas. I have no idea what the heck that means and haven't seen that anywhere here in Korea.

BTW, great blog and such brilliantly colored pictures.

Cho Eun Mat. It means Good Taste and Yoonhi says they're anju (drinking food) a mixture of red bean and rice crackers and nuts. The katakana is just a read of the Korean - jyo en mashi. I would've thought they'd have translated, but maybe it sounds more exotic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I DO fear I would have one small problem with the days-of-the-week sorting of the garbage---I save every big plastic Folger's coffee container against the day of glass breakage---I've even been known to smash the pieces even smaller to make them fit safely into the container, so as not to have a nasty surprise poking through the bag.

Folgers comes in plastic??

Yes.

My Webpage

And now that I've outed myself as such a plebeian coffee-drinker to these august pages, I'll just say that it's one of the few kinds which is pre-ground of a size NOT to fall through the holes in my percolator. And that buying any beans, no matter how elite and rare, grinding them results in SOME powder which a filter-system will take out, but not the perc.

And at some times of the year, and at this time of my life, I just get a craving for the old days, the old ways, and waking up at my age to the familiar, remembered scent of the same coffee as I had in my teens and young married life---well, Proust liked what HE remembered, and Tom Wolfe was only partly right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These containers have great ergonomics. I have a big fine motor control hand problem in my dominant hand, and regular watering cans cause me distress and grief. My trusty plastic Folgers can is my current watering can of choice. A different kind of recycling I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cho Eun Mat.  It means Good Taste and Yoonhi says they're anju (drinking food) a mixture of red bean and rice crackers and nuts.  The katakana is just a read of the Korean - jyo en mashi.  I would've thought they'd have translated, but maybe it sounds more exotic?

Thanks Peter Green and Domestic Goddess. The katakana actually says "cho unma" (the small "tsu" at the end is silent) and is very similar to the Japanese "chou umma" or "chou umai". On the back it does say that's the original pronunciation and meaning of the Korean but I was a bit suspicious because it's quite a coincidence. But the languages do have some similarities so I guess it shouldn't be such a surprise.

Since Domestic Goddess hasn't seen them is it correct to assume that "anju" are mostly consumed by men?


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For lunch I made a hanami bento (flower viewing lunch box) to bring to the local park:

gallery_7940_5772_36128.jpg

Bottom left compartment: fuki (butterbur) simmered with carrots; cherry tomatoes; teriyaki scallops; takuan (daikon piclkles); buta no negimaki (long onion wrapped with pork); brocolli; soramame (fresh fava beans). The next compartment has some of the same things plus udo (leftover from two nights ago) and tsukune yaki (sauteed chicken patties wrapped in nori and shiso). Above that is dessert: strawberries, apples (including my first ever "usagi ringo", or apple slices cut to look like rabbits) and segments of dekopon, a tangerine-like citrus.

The bento boxes must be about a decade old and were free from Mr Donuts. I badly need cuter ones but I don't make bento often enough to justify the expense.

gallery_7940_5772_70992.jpg

These are onigiri (rice balls), one type made of rice mixed type with salmon flakes and the other with plain rice stuffed with mentaiko (spicy cod roe).

gallery_7940_5772_44213.jpg

We found a good spot near a small grove of ume (Japanese apricot) trees and this was our view. Hanami (flower viewing) is more strongly associted with sakura (cherry blossoms), and sakura are far more popular than ume. It's true ume don't look as impressive from a distance as sakura, but the individual flowers are just as pretty and also have a soft sweet fragrance, which sakura don't have. Sakura also bloom when the weather is a bit warmer which is more condusive to hanami picnics, but if the weather is nice enough there's no reason not to celebrate ume as well. Luckily today was a lovely warm, sunny day.

gallery_7940_5772_94861.jpg

To drink with our bento there was amazake in the thermos, sake in the bottle and water in the portable coffee mug (there must be a name for those that I'm forgetting).

gallery_7940_5772_14337.jpg

We took our time eating and drinking, taking breaks to people-watch or take pictures of the flowers. The park was crowded with families who were picnicking and enjoying one of the first really nice spring-like days of the year. Everybody came to see the ume trees and snapped pictures, held fat-cheeked babies up to see the blossoms, and let their dogs pee on the trunks (not so nice while we were eating).

gallery_7940_5772_11702.jpg

And although my husband didn't consent to having another picture taken, he did take one of me:

gallery_7940_5772_92765.jpg

Kampai!


My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the lovely photos! Very clever. I never expected that you'd show us ume blossoms instead of cherry blossoms.

I was amused to see the bamboo shamoji in the rice cooker. I use a plastic one that came with the rice cooker. I want to buy a non-stick one some day.

I wonder how the fuki was seasoned. No mayo for the broccoli?

Edited to add: It sure was a sunny day today, even in my snowy area. I took two walks today, skipping the weeky house-cleaning.

Correction: Shamoji not shomoji (blush)


Edited by Hiroyuki (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! What an incredible looking bento! As a Canadian, I still feel surprise when Spring starts in early March, and I always want to get out and enjoy the weather while I can - there's some part of me that feels that even if it's warm and sunny one day, it could still snow again the next. What better way to celebrate than to get out and have a picnic!

buta no negimaki (long onion wrapped with pork)

Can you describe how you make this? It sounds like something my husband would love.

I took two walks today, skipping the weekly house-cleaning.

Hiroyuki, you always make me smile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By sartoric
      We're 50 something Aussies who enjoy travelling, eating, cooking, markets, kitchen shops, cooking utensils, animals & plants (often food related), architecture & photography (both kitchens and food) and exploring different cultures (of which food is a big part). The trip was January 14 - February 6, it was just marvellous. My favourite meal is now masala dosa with sambar, I had many. Here's some highlights of the food.
       
      A late afternoon snack of Sichuan pepper squid was washed down with a beer at the Ajantha Seaview Hotel on the promenade in Pondicherry. It's a colonial building with a first floor terrace overlooking the colourful display of women in their finest, and the Bay of Bengal. We're here on a Monday public holiday for the Pongal festival, a four day celebration of the harvest, with many different ceremonies and traditions.
       
       

       
      A visual bonus, cows (and sometimes goats) get their horns painted and wear flower garlands or other decorations.

       
    • By Christy Martino
      Ciao!
       
      I'm Christine and I'm a born and bred New Yorker. I’m an Italian by blood (and at heart, of course) since my parents actually came from Italy. My father was from Sciacca, Sicily while my mother was from Sondrio, Lombardy. Despite coming from different regions, or because of it, love for food and cooking has been one of the mainstays in my family home life growing up. And I’ve always loved the dishes my parents prepared during special occasions, and even on regular days.
       
      And of course, I love cooking (and eating) Italian food and I have a few recipes from my mother, but I'd really love to collect some more, especially the traditional ones. And if anyone can contribute some historical background to each dish, that would be really great.
       
      Grazie mille!
    • By Chef Margie
      Hello Everyone!
       
      Happy to join eGullet in hopes to share my passion for culinary and kitchen with others. I have an Instagram account, but I don't think that is enough as I want to learn more, expand, and share my love for food with individuals who share the same passion.
       
      Here is a brief bio about myself: Born and raised in Los Angeles, CA by my Filipino parents. Having no brothers and sisters, I am very independent and surprisingly social with others but also love spending time on my own and with my boyfriend Louis, who is my kitchen partner in crime (this is how we actually met, working BOH at a local Vietnamese restaurant in LA). Having attended college majoring in accounting as an undergrad and grad, I orignally wanted to become a licensed accountant for finance and real estate, but it was not fulfilling and the content honestly bored me to death! I also desired to leave the corporate business world and join the professional kitchen. So I took the leap, graduated culinary school, quit my desk job, and worked in the professional kitchen. Then my health and finances took over, and I had surgery and I needed more money to survive in a city of ridiculous rent prices. I had to leave the kitchen and go back into accounting. Fast forward to 2017, I am currently unemployed having been laid off two days before Christmas the prior year! Using this as a sign and as an opportunity for self growth and realization, I am once again on the culinary path. Not necessarily to work on the line, but to learn more, cook and bake more at home, and expose myself out there to all things food and kitchen. Not also forgetting to mention I am always surrounded by food: Louis is also still in the professional kitchen, and we WILL have that restaurant one day (dreams DO come true, I just know it!).
       
      Anyhow, I am super excited to be posting here and exchanging ideas! See you out there! 
       
      Margie
    • By ElsieD
      We are at the airport waiting to board our flight.  As we seem to have interested folks from different parts of the world who may not know too much about our province,  I thought I would start this blog by giving you an overview of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
       
      Before Newfoundland  became part of Canada in 1949, it was a British Colony.  Cupids, a town on Conception Bay, was settled 406 years ago, and is the oldest continuously settled official British community in Canada.  Most of the early permanent settlers came from southwest England and southeast Ireland although  the French also settled here and in the 17th century Newfoundland was more French than English.  French is still spoken in Port au Port Penninsula, on the western side of the island, with English spoken everywhere else.   Just off the coast of south west Newfoundland, St. Pierre et Miquelon are islands that are still a colony of France.  There is a regular ferry service between Fortune, NL and St. Pierre et Miquelon.
       
      Geographically, the capital of St. John's is on the same latitude as Paris, France and Seattle, Washington.  In size, Newfoundland and Labrador is a little smaller than California, slightly bigger than Japan and twice the size of the United Kingdon.  NL covers 405,212 sq. kilometers (156,453 sq. miles) with over 29,000 kilometers (18,000 miles) of coastline.  By itself, the island of Newfoundland covers 111,390 square kilometers (43,008 sq. miles).
       
      The population of NL is 510,000, of whom 181,000 live in St. John's.  While there are some larger towns, vast areas are sparsely populated.
       
      In Newfoundland there are no snakes, skunks, racoons, poisonous insects or arachnids.  There is also no ragweed - allergy sufferers rejoice!  There are over 120,000 moose and it is home to one of the world's biggest caribou herds.   They also have some of the continent's biggest black bears.
       
      Note: This information was taken from the official Newfoundland and Labrador web site.
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.