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Chicken Stock


Akiko
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I just made a stock from a package of legs. I took the meat out and used it for a one-pot meal, and returned the skin, bones, etc. to the crock pot. After a while, I strained it, and put it into the fridge, without reducing it. It was wonderfully jelly-like, without too much fat. I skimmed what fat there was, and reduced it by half. It's in the freezer, now, and will be canned when I have enough stocks for a full canner load. IMO, the skin adds a lot of gelatin and flavor.

Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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Then it seems a bit precipitate to dismiss those who make chicken stock at home.

I wasn't dismissing, i was asking why you'd prefer a light chicken stock at home. In a restaurant I could understand, but at home I tend to go for maximum flavor :blush:

Edited by Crouton (log)
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If you were just asking, then I guess the answer I would give is: risotto. (Among other things.) I mean, yes, water can be used to great effect in some preparations, but having a neutral stock is extremely useful, even for home cooks. It's great for pan sauces, too, where you want the mouthfeel of stock, without necessarily wanting the flavours associated with a dark stock. I would say I use light chicken stock the way restaurants use light veal stock, since chicken is a lot easier for me to source.

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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I agree that there is a use for light stock -- I find that in certain soups -- often vegetable or legume based -- I want the body and some of the flavor that comes from chicken stock, but I don't want it to wind up tasting like chicken soup...

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IMHO chicken skin infuses a ton of flavor. I prefer non roasted. I saw it mentioned earlier, I love using the feet as well. As far as intensity, you can always use water to dilute.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

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If you were just asking, then I guess the answer I would give is: risotto. (Among other things.) I mean, yes, water can be used to great effect in some preparations, but having a neutral stock is extremely useful, even for home cooks. It's great for pan sauces, too, where you want the mouthfeel of stock, without necessarily wanting the flavours associated with a dark stock. I would say I use light chicken stock the way restaurants use light veal stock, since chicken is a lot easier for me to source.

I agree. I have a couple of pounds of chicken feet that I'm going to make stock out of, just for that reason. Sometimes, I just want the body, without the flavor. Without adding powdered gelatin. If that makes me weird, so be it. I've been called weird about a lot of thngs, so one more won't hurt.

Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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No aversion to powdered gelatin, here. It's just more of a PITA to use, for me, than popping open a jar of home-canned stock. No need to wait for it to bloom, etc. Plus, I hardly keep it around.

And frankly, I'm a geek. I LIKE extracting my own gelatin from the source, as it were.

Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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  • 1 year later...

It is disappointing to see serious home cooks using these products, which have absolutely no relationship to Escoffier or even Ruhlman.

I use chicken carcasses from an Asian store @ $1/lb. I'll put that stock, (just 45 min. in a PC,) against any commercial product.

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I generally agree with jayt90, except I don't use a PC, but the glacé product looks worth trying. But you can make good stock with bargain wings, thighs, old hens, carcasses, etc, and remember the most important thing: you can make a small batch. Stock making need not be a big production unless you are making real veal stock

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Actually, I simply make my own stock. For chicken, 10# of backs and I hope, a few necks, water to cover . Bring to a boil, pour off the water , wash the chicken parts[ rince with hot water] , simmer at 190 degrees for about 3-4 hours, then add couple chooped carrots, couple leeks including green parts, a stick or two of celery-- I don't, caUSE i THINK CELERY IS TOO BITTER, maybe you might want to add some Parsely, I don't 'cause I want a clean white stock. Cook at 190 degrees for another hour . Cool { Ice in a cooler around the pan} put it in the reefer, package.

That is simple, now I come to my conundrum.

I have been packiging in Deli containerins like used to sell you a salad or portion of beans. I got on a mission and found these things aren't BPA Free.

Ideas please.

Sorry, I can see spelling errors but I can't figure out how to use this sites stuff to solve my lack of knowledge.

How do I now package this stock? I have 15 qt waiting.

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Robert

Seattle

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I make most of my stock from scratch, saving whatever bones I generate in the freezer until I reach critical mass for pressure cooking. I try to make big enough batches that I can freeze copious amounts of leftovers. I also do this for more involved stocks... I've got a couple quarts of the Momofuku ramen broth in my freezer right now. But when I can't make something from scratch (or it's too much hassle to thaw something) I use the More than Gourmet stocks/demis which taste very good for most applications -- far better than store bought stocks. A 16oz tub can seem expensive, but they last forever (about 6 months) in the fridge and they take up much less space than boxes or cans of broth from the megamart. Did I mention that they taste better?

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Actually, I simply make my own stock. For chicken, 10# of backs and I hope, a few necks, water to cover . Bring to a boil, pour off the water , wash the chicken parts[ rince with hot water] , simmer at 190 degrees for about 3-4 hours, then add couple chooped carrots, couple leeks including green parts, a stick or two of celery-- I don't, caUSE i THINK CELERY IS TOO BITTER, maybe you might want to add some Parsely, I don't 'cause I want a clean white stock. Cook at 190 degrees for another hour . Cool { Ice in a cooler around the pan} put it in the reefer, package.

That is simple, now I come to my conundrum.

I have been packiging in Deli containerins like used to sell you a salad or portion of beans. I got on a mission and found these things aren't BPA Free.

Ideas please.

Sorry, I can see spelling errors but I can't figure out how to use this sites stuff to solve my lack of knowledge.

How do I now package this stock? I have 15 qt waiting.

Use BPA free canning jars and lids.

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I always save chicken bones over time and then make stock from that using TK's recipe.

But as that wasn't the question asked and I'm sure Shel_B knows the virtues of homemade stock versus canned stock, but is aware of the convenience of using canned stock when needed, I'd say -

The More than Gourmet is fantastic stuff. Someone posted a link to buying the roasted stock in reduced form (add 20 parts of water or something like that), and I'm sure that is fantastic. I haven't had experience with that exact stock, but I buy the "liquid" form of chicken stock and beef stock they sell and it is great. I can always find that at Whole Foods and I think Fresh Market.

http://www.amazon.com/More-Than-Gourmet-Culinary-32-Ounce/dp/B001PNXO5Y/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1391088020&sr=8-4&keywords=more+than+gourmet+chicken+stock

http://www.amazon.com/More-Than-Gourmet-Culinary-32-Ounce/dp/B001PNXO3G/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1391088031&sr=8-3&keywords=more+than+gourmet+beef+stock

I also recently purchased this veal stock (add water) and made a red wine sauce for a steak and it was amazing - http://www.amazon.com/More-Than-Gourmet-1-5-Ounce-Packages/dp/B001EO619A/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1391088121&sr=8-2&keywords=more+than+gourmet+veal+stock

I can't get veal bones so that is the best I can do.

I don't have an oven so I can't make my own beef stock. I used the More than Gourmet beef stock in beef bourguignon and it was great.

I highly recommend More Than Gourmet and I learned of the brand from James Peterson's high recommendation.

Quick thing about using water - depending the situation, definitely fantastic. Made French Onion Soup with it (Ruhlman's recipe) and it worked perfectly.

Edited by Robenco15 (log)
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