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Chicken Stock


Akiko
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Thanks, all.

 

For myself I have no set way to poach chicken; it depends on what I'm making and which cuisine (European vs E/SE Asian, for example) it is in. I've done it using the constant-simmer way and the bring-to-boil-then-turn-the-heat-off way with whole chickens. Length of time depends on the size of the chicken and what kind it is. Hainanese-style chicken (equivalent to "pak cham kai" or "pak chit kai') is done either way too; and in this case lots of ginger go into the poaching stock. The b-t-b-t-t-t-h-o way is done in Chinese cuisine too.  A hard simmer/low boil vs bare simmer also matters, of course. Chicken pieces in a European-style dish I might do either half-submerged (covered; with turning over) in a flavored/herbed stock w/ or w/o wine or submerged; chicken pieces poached in broth or water which becomes soup is done completely submerged. And so on. With the whole-chicken poaching yes, the poaching liquid then becomes the "stock" for soup (e.g. in Hainanese chicken, as mentioned) and for cooking the rice. I've posted on various renditions of this in the meal threads/topics over the years. (Traditionally, in restaurants, the poaching stock would be held for poaching the next chicken, and the next, and the next...topping up as needed as it evaporated down...resulting in an eventual very flavorful stock and flavorful chickens too. The rice and soup are cooked using another chicken stock.)

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  • 5 weeks later...

The latest batch.

 

DSCN9767a_600.jpg

 

ETA: After I took off most of the (very yellow) fat on top Iadled out some of the clear stock with residual fat and drank it as-is. This is always one of the most satisfying things one can do in one's kitchen. 

 

ETA2: Had another big bowl of it, just standing there in the kitchen in front of the stove, drinking straight from the bowl. Aaahhh.

Edited by huiray (log)
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I just made my 3rd batch of brown chicken stock with the pressure cooker. This is definitely the most flavorful chicken stock I've made. It was a mix of frozen carcasses, some meaty "soup bones" from the grocery, and about 750g of chicken breast bought on sale. Total yield (I'm guessing) is about 3.5L.

 

Since I'm pushing the size limits of my 10qt pressure cooker, I sous-vided the chicken breast (after grinding) 90°C for 90 minutes. Strained the resulting stock into the liquids that go into the pressure cooker. My cat is crazy about the remaining dry meat. My plan was to reserve 60g of this for the pressure cooker, to help clarify, but I forgot.

 

I roasted the carcasses and soup bones and also the mirepoix veggies (about half as much veg as I'd use in a conventional stock ... you don't lose as much of the aromatics). 

 

The liquids were the s.v. stock from the breast, deglazing liquid from the roasting, defrosted s.v. bag juices from previous meals, and water.

 

The result is dark brown, heavy on roasted flavors and aromas, with a very 3-dimensional chicken flavor. It's not clear, but not muddy or cloudy either. 

 

I think it will be aces in sauces for chicken; the question remains if it's too chickeny to use as a more all purpose brown stock.

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Notes from the underbelly

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  • 1 month later...

Yesterday's batch.

DSCN0221b_600.jpg

 

After decanting (the stuff pourable without the chicken pieces falling out) through paper towels in a large metal sieve, which also served to trap (separate off, rather) much of the fat – a couple ladles of the stock, w/ some coriander leaves on top.

DSCN0230b_500.jpg

 

All of the final decant, with some light thumping, with dregs & sediment getting through – with retrieved/plucked off pieces of dark meat, some of the oyster nuggets from the chicken back pieces, and chicken skin; zapped in the MW to reheat. Chopped scallions. Some Maldon salt. Greatly enjoyed.

DSCN0225b_600.jpg

 

The fat retained by the paper towels allowed to drip through slowly into another bowl then was chilled and the fat solids taken off the residual liquid layer for other uses.

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I make chicken stock about four times a year.

Full disclosure: Around here I can pick up any number of old roosters which people list on sites like Kijiji for free.

They are live. Some are old 'pets' which have outlived their welcome.

So I'll pick up four old roosters. Take them to a friend who has a machine which removes all the feathers.

Cleaned well washed chilled 'parted'. Parts Into a large commercial size stock pot. Covered with cold water. About five pounds of fresh pork bones. A large handful of leeks. No onions. No other veg. No salt.

Bring just to a boil. Low simmer for a couple of hours only.

Remove all pork bones and chicken parts and leeks and discard.

Back to a very low simmer to reduce by at least half. This can take at least a day.

Make a 'raft'. Cool and carefully ladle out the clear stock.

Into fridge over night. Remove any fat on the surface.

Into Ziploc bags.

This 'mother stock' is then used every which way. Herbs/seasonings added as needed.

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2 hours ago, pufin3 said:

I make chicken stock about four times a year.

Full disclosure: Around here I can pick up any number of old roosters which people list on sites like Kijiji for free.

They are live. Some are old 'pets' which have outlived their welcome.

So I'll pick up four old roosters. Take them to a friend who has a machine which removes all the feathers.

Cleaned well washed chilled 'parted'. Parts Into a large commercial size stock pot. Covered with cold water. About five pounds of fresh pork bones. A large handful of leeks. No onions. No other veg. No salt.

Bring just to a boil. Low simmer for a couple of hours only.

Remove all pork bones and chicken parts and leeks and discard.

Back to a very low simmer to reduce by at least half. This can take at least a day.

Make a 'raft'. Cool and carefully ladle out the clear stock.

Into fridge over night. Remove any fat on the surface.

Into Ziploc bags.

This 'mother stock' is then used every which way. Herbs/seasonings added as needed.

 

I am reminded of the famous NY Times recipe, Kill Duck before Servingir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=031228427.

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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@JoNorvelleWalker

 

 You shouldn't have done that.  At my age one can have too much laughter. I will leave it at that.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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thanks for the ref. to the Duck.  Its in my library system and Im looking forward to it.

 

this may have been mentioned up thread, I now use my InstantPot to make stock.  I just save the carcasses and use the Soup button

 

it sooooo easy.  in the past I rarely made stock of any kind, due to Lazzy-ness.  certainly not in the summer.

 

now its a year round thing when I accumulate enough Ck Parts.

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  • 3 weeks later...

A bowl of the latest batch of chicken stock, with some chopped scallions.

DSCN0552a_600.jpg

Stock made as before, decanted through paper towels lining a metal sieve; with most of the fat retained by the paper towels (and allowed to drip through slowly afterwards into a bowl). Several rice-bowls-worth of the stock happily drunk straight away standing in the kitchen, getting sticky lips; one or two bowls w/ some retrieved skin and meat afterwards; and this bowl later after rewarming the filtered stock. I think I drank about half of the stock before putting the rest away. :-)  I won't bother reducing the remainder of it and will just drink it up instead - oops, that means I need to make more real soon. :-D

Edited by huiray (log)
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  • 7 months later...
On 10/2/2002 at 2:00 PM, rslux said:

Am I a nutjob for using root vegetables (generally rutabaga or maybe turnip) in my chicken stock along with the carrot, leek, and celery?

 

Nope. I put a turnip in mine.  Love the earthy undertone.  Nobody would ever "taste turnip," just the interesting saveur...

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I use your basic 3, onions,carrots,celery. But here are a few tips/tricks ive learned over the years. #1 If you like hot wings and make them often like i do, save the wing tips and freeze them to add for chicken stock. Its one of the best sources for gelatin and for me its free. #2 When you buy a head of celery seperate the stalks and cut the top section off (the section with the leaves) save the leafy section and freeze to use in making stock. Keep the stalks in a tall container filled with ice water, it keeps in the fridge for weeks and stays crisp, maybe even more crisp then when it was bought.

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