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Purge the Larder


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that is just a brilliant idea! thanks for sharing I can see how this would work!!! and looks very cool thank you!

makes no sense to spend a lot of money if you dont have to that is for sure!

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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The best things in my house are from garage sales and thrift stores--almost all of my cookbooks, Le Creuset, AllClad, and three of the four KitchenAid mixers I've bought. I pass the displays in expensive stores and just kind of smile...

See, I have to save money on my kitchenware so I can afford to buy fifty kinds of spices and a pantry full of stuff that I might never eat.

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As I'm cleaning out the cupboards and the freezer, I find more stuff I overlooked when I took inventory. A small bag of frozen cranberries popped into view when I removed a humungous bundle of chicken bones from the freezer last week. (Oh no! Not more! I screamed.) I recovered from the experience and baked a coffeecake with the cranberries and some leftover fresh cornmeal from my CSA.

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This supereasy quick coffeecake is from Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone. http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:R1kX_...clnk&cd=1&gl=us

A few days later I bumped into a partial can of SB Cocoa Nibs at the back of a cupboard. Eeeek!!

Last week I cooked the lentils, and tossed them while they were still warm with a garlicky vinaigrette and chopped preserved lemon, to make a salad. This was yummy and easy to make. I should make lentil salad more often.

All those pistachios came out of the freezer, and I finally made pistachio ice cream.

I spiked the can of tomato sauce with sauteed chopped garlic and onion, rosemary, and white wine, and served it over pasta with grilled lamb chops.

The last of the preserved lemons will go into a braised chicken dish with garlic, onion, white wine, saffron, parsley, and olives. That's for dinner tonight.

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The last of the preserved lemons will go into a braised chicken dish with garlic, onion, white wine, saffron, parsley, and olives. That's for dinner tonight.

If this turns out as delicious as it sounds, would you please provide the recipe?

I made a quart of preserved lemons some time ago and have not gotten 'round to using them.

On another subject:

ham ends - chop, put into quiche.

make deviled ham spread

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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I finished the last of the oatmeal and the last of the grits will go tomorrow. I'm also down one jar of honey. A batch of chocolate-pistachio-chocolate chip biscotti took up one of the partial containers of cocoa and half of the remaining pistachios and chocolate chips. If they go over well at work, I may make more. Baking seems to be in my future. I have three bags of unopened flour - self-rising, KA white whole wheat, and KA bread - then there are the AP and white whole wheat already in canisters. I'm not sure what I was thinking with the self-rising. Now that I reread this, I'm not sure what I was thinking buying all this flour! It must have been a Christmas baking special that temporarily short-circuited the brain synapses.

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I'll have to post a photo.  I searched for one that I would like, but nothing was available locally and was too expensive online.  So I just bought some test tubes, caps and corks, and a holder online from a supply company.  I wouldn't have minded getting a smaller one, but I like this one. 

I had originally bought the test tubes and lids to put vanilla beans in, but liked the idea of a spice rack, too.  Dean and DeLuca has one for about $150, which I liked but wasn't about to spend that much.  I had a few smaller ones in my kitchen (repurposed toothbrush holders) but they didn't hold enough.

So for about ten bucks for the rack https://www.testtubesonline.com/PhotoGaller...ode=211%2D0022W and not a whole lot of money for the tubes, I got something I'm happy with.

That reminds me that I have to do something with the racks I bought when a local gourmet kitchen store went out of business about ten years ago. I bought quite a few of their display things, including 4 of these spice tube holders.

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I bought a bunch of tubes but so far they are still in the box in which they arrived, on a top shelf in the pantry. Sometimes I am just so lazy it is inexcusable!

I even had four "floating" shelves installed to hold them, complete with little holes for the feet so they wouldn't fall off in an earthquake. (The shelves are not empty, you must understand, they simply have become "catch-alls" for anything I might have in my hand when I walk past.) Arrrrrrrrgh!

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I do have a place for my spices and etc., located in the pantry, which remains much cooler (especially during the summer months) and there is no exposure to sunlight and the room lights turn themselves off automatically.

Having everything in the same area makes it easy to load a tray with all the little containers I will need for just about any recipe.

Since this thread began, I have been purging the various spices and herbs that might be less than optimum in flavor, so I have at least made a little progress. Tackling the "staples" in the grain and legume section is next.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I do have a place for my spices and etc., located in the pantry, which remains much cooler (especially during the summer months) and there is no exposure to sunlight and the room lights turn themselves off automatically. 

Having everything in the same area makes it easy to load a tray with all the little containers I will need for just about any recipe.

Since this thread began, I have been purging the various spices and herbs that might be less than optimum in flavor, so I have at least made a little progress.  Tackling the "staples" in the grain and legume section is next.

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Ohmigawd! I thought my spice and sauce dollection was nuts; I don't have half of yours! I salute you, Andisenji! :shock::raz:

ETA a plural...

Edited by judiu (log)

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I'm trying to figure out if those trays are really nice wooden boxes or the inserts from chocolate boxes! I just threw one of those out when I was cleaning and it looks just like that.

I like how you've labeled things--I should do more of that. I can usually count on my nose to tell me what the spice is if I've bought it in bulk and lost the tag, but some of them can be tricky.

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I'm trying to figure out if those trays are really nice wooden boxes or the inserts from chocolate boxes!  I just threw one of those out when I was cleaning and it looks just like that.

I like how you've labeled things--I should do more of that.  I can usually count on my nose to tell me what the spice is if I've bought it in bulk and lost the tag, but some of them can be tricky.

The boxes are wooden. They were intended to hold small votive candles on tiers. I bought six at a small store that carries religious item as I thought they would be prefect for displaying scrimshaw, amber and gemstone carvings, back in the days that I was still able to use my right hand for that type of activity.

They keep little items neatly positioned and I wish I could find more that are made as nicely as these.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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The last of the preserved lemons will go into a braised chicken dish with garlic, onion, white wine, saffron, parsley, and olives. That's for dinner tonight.

If this turns out as delicious as it sounds, would you please provide the recipe?

I made a quart of preserved lemons some time ago and have not gotten 'round to using them.

Sure, here's the recipe. Enjoy!

Braised Chicken with Preserved Lemons & Olives

2 TB olive oil

3 lbs chicken pieces

1 large onion, thinly sliced

2 cloves garlic, crushed

2 TB freshly chopped parsley

salt & pepper

pinch of saffron threads, crumbled

1 cup chicken stock

1/2 cup white wine

2 preserved lemons

1 cup olives

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Heat the oil in a Dutch oven or stovetop-to-oven casserole dish. Brown the chicken well on all sides. Remove the chicken from the pan and set aside. Saute the onion and garlic until soft and translucent, stir in 1 TB of the parsley, salt & pepper, and saffron. Cook a minute or so more. Add in the chicken stock and the wine, and bring to a boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to release the brown bits. Layer the chicken pieces on top. Cover, and cook in the oven for approximately one hour, until the chicken is tender and cooked through.

While the chicken is cooking, rinse the preserved lemons well, and scrape out the inside membranes. Cut the lemon peel into 1/4" dice, and set aside. Rinse the olives well to lessen the saltiness, and set aside.

When the chicken is done, transfer the chicken and onions to a serving dish and keep warm. Strain the sauce. Reheat the sauce in a saucepan, bring to a boil, and add in the preserved lemon and olives. Spoon the hot sauce over the chicken, garnish with the remaining 1 TB of parsley, and serve immediately.

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That dish is just beautiful!

Yesterday evening I finally got in gear and did my first "purge" and mixed up a batch of stollen, using some whole wheat flour I had ground in December that was taking up space in the freezer.

Also pulled the half-full jar of mixed fruits off the shelf in the pantry and drained off the liquor in which they had been resting for six months.

I made double-sized loaves and they turned out better than I expected.

I don't care for the sweeter type stollen as I feel this is more versatile and can be used for sandwiches.

I baked them on a half-size sheet pan:

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I made the first cut while the loaf was still quite warm. The slice was taken after the loaf had cooled completely and is therefore a bit neater.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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That dish is just beautiful!

Yesterday evening I finally got in gear and did my first "purge" and mixed up a batch of stollen, using some whole wheat flour I had ground in December that was taking up space in the freezer.

Also pulled the half-full jar of mixed fruits off the shelf in the pantry and drained off the liquor in which they had been resting for six months. 

I made double-sized loaves and they turned out better than I expected. 

I don't care for the sweeter type stollen as I feel this is more versatile and can be used for sandwiches.

I baked them on a half-size sheet pan:

gallery_17399_60_92170.jpg

gallery_17399_60_170481.jpg

gallery_17399_60_184845.jpg

gallery_17399_60_258545.jpg

I made the first cut while the loaf was still quite warm.  The slice was taken after the loaf had cooled completely and is therefore a bit neater.

Oh, Andi, that just cries out to me for cream cheese to be slathered on and then the whole thing eaten with coffee! Looks beautiful!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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wow could I dive into that chicken dish right now I printed the recipe and will be making it ..

the bread is beautiful as well

sigh I want to leave work now and go home and cook ...badly ..

too many sick people today

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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That dish is just beautiful!

Yesterday evening I finally got in gear and did my first "purge" and mixed up a batch of stollen, using some whole wheat flour I had ground in December that was taking up space in the freezer.

Also pulled the half-full jar of mixed fruits off the shelf in the pantry and drained off the liquor in which they had been resting for six months. 

I made double-sized loaves and they turned out better than I expected. 

I don't care for the sweeter type stollen as I feel this is more versatile and can be used for sandwiches.

I baked them on a half-size sheet pan:

I made the first cut while the loaf was still quite warm.  The slice was taken after the loaf had cooled completely and is therefore a bit neater.

Oh, Andi, that just cries out to me for cream cheese to be slathered on and then the whole thing eaten with coffee! Looks beautiful!

I prepared some chicken salad for lunch (actually it was meat from guinea hen that I had roasted on Sunday) and it was delicious on the toasted stollen.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I prepared some chicken salad for lunch (actually it was meat from guinea hen that I had roasted on Sunday) and it was delicious on the toasted stollen.

Anything would taste good on that stollen. :rolleyes:

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I managed to make a good size dent in my stash of wheatberries by making one of my favorite salads today. It is basically a play on a caprese salad: wheatberries, chopped tomatoes (I used grape tomatoes, since they tend to taste the best in winter), cubed fresh mozzarella, and basil, tossed in a balsamic vinagrette. The original recipe I found actually calls for feta cheese, but I'm always looking for an excuse to eat fresh mozzarella. Both ways are delicious.

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I managed to make a good size dent in my stash of wheatberries by making one of my favorite salads today.  It is basically a play on a caprese salad: wheatberries, chopped tomatoes (I used grape tomatoes, since they tend to taste the best in winter), cubed fresh mozzarella, and basil, tossed in a balsamic vinagrette.  The original recipe I found actually calls for feta cheese, but I'm always looking for an excuse to eat fresh mozzarella.  Both ways are delicious.

Ooooh, tabouli, only different! Sounds great :biggrin:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I fell off the wagon. :shock: Walking around Harris Teeter after grabbing a box of grape tomatoes to make that wonderful sounding salad (to use up yet more wheat berries), I passed a display of KA flour. Regular price $5.79 (really exorbitantly high) on sale today 2 for $5.00 (a really good buy). I couldn't resist. Five pounds of all purpose is now staring at me from the midst of four other bags of flour. But there are always setbacks before you cross the finish line, right??

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djyee 100, that is absolutely gorgeous chicken!

Right... who to invite to dinner and how soon can I get them here?

Buying supplies is not falling off the wagon. Using up "gonna go stale" and "what was I thinking" stuff is a victory. Flour is a staple. Plus, stolen uses a lot of flour and there may be a few of us copying andiesenji soon. Or if you feel really guilty, go join the party on the 5 min bread thread. :wink:

I've been inactive. But the weekend approacheth, perhaps I shall be inspired!

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Kudos to ALL!! Quite remarkable feats, both cooking and cleaning.

I'm in a bog, nothing accomplished for DAYS :sad:

Intentions, yes. Impetus, ditto. But Inclination---that went the way of the dishwasher arm, which was resting atop the bottom dishes when I opened it one day last week. I quickly onlined the parts, being promised them "between the 11th and 18th" with an astonishingly-quick delivery of most with a day, but one piece. Five boxes of parts ranging from flat and impressive to screw-size wee, sitting beneath the china cabinet.

I put the evening teapot into the microwave a day or two later, and upon opening the door, still cool. I tried again; it counted down exactly three seconds, wheezed to a halt. Banged on the front with the cushy part of my palms---started right up, made the tea and perhaps one other dish, before dying entirely. No fear, a fortuitous buy of one last fall leads us to have a spare in the house, just not down HERE, and not in the big microwave case on the wall. Maybe this weekend.

Then Monday, Caro and I were doing our usual Monday togetherness, cooking a bit, watching a Jane Austen movie, and the sink faucet sprang forth like Niagara. Chris went to Lowe's, bought a nice new one, and encountered Dante's Ninth Ring beneath the counter---a labyrinth of pipes, even after you got past the water softener, the disposal, and the filter thingie on the side wall that keeps the water for the ice machine clear.

So, Lowe's made us a deal---they'd send someone to install it, for X dollars, flat rate, no matter WHAT was under there. It just means waiting for whoever they send to arrive.

I've been doing my forty handwashings per meal in the bathroom, forgetting and turning it on occasionally, so there are big folded towels at each end of the back indentation to catch mishaps, and I heat things ---- Ta DAH!!! On the STOVE.

But it sure cut into my enthusiasm for all things kitchen for a while, including the pantry. I feel as if my life's been choreographed by Mr. O. W. Holmes this week:

You see, of course, if you’re not a dunce,

How it went to pieces all at once, —

All at once, and nothing first, —

Just as bubbles do when they burst.

I feel as if I'll be doing cartwheels and could clean the Augean Stables, once I get my kitchen back.

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Whole wheat flour stales very rapidly after it is home-ground, even stored in the freezer. At least I can taste the difference when it begins to "turn" and I usually grind only enough for the current recipe.

While preparing some pastries for the holidays, I mis-read the recipe and ground twice as much red wheat as I needed at that time and simply didn't get around to using it for anything else.

I know it is not traditional to use whole wheat flour in stollen but I like the nutty flavor and because the wheat itself is slightly sweet on its own, I can use less sweetener (Splenda/sugar blend). For diabetics like me, this is an important consideration.

I used 2/3 WW and 1/3 AP flour.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I used up one of the cartons of egg substitute making a chinese-style caramel egg custard/pudding. It's sort of like flan or creme caramel, but not as rich (at least not the versions I've had). Surprisingly the flavor was pretty spot on (though obviously not as eggy, but I think that's true to the style), but the texture was atrocious. It's good enough for family eating, but I wouldn't let anyone else see the things.

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