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phlawless

Consulting

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I need some help figuring out rates for consulting. What I have been asked to do:

-develop a seasonal menu (it's small, food is not the focus of this venture but a necessary part) that might require an ongoing relationship/commitment

-costing, pricing, help with budget

-assistance with kitchen design (working with an architect who has food service/restaurant experience

-development of staffing needs and budget, along with training

I do have experience doing this, but on a much simpler level. I need help with how to break this up into per hour and per task rates. Can anyone offer any advice?


"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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Contact other firms in the area in which you live that do similar consulting work and find out what their hourly rates are. Decide on something competitive based on the feedback and your own level of expertise.


Edited by tino27 (log)

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I do have experience doing this, but on a much simpler level. I need help with how to break this up into per hour and per task rates. Can anyone offer any advice?

My husband was a consultant for several years (different industry, but similar enough)...the one danger of setting an hourly rate is that your client will rarely accept the number of hours you say it will take. Nobody thinks anything takes as long as it actually does. So you'll find yourself "nickel and dimed" on everything. The way he did his proposals was to give a flat rate for a "project" and then an hourly rate for tasks which would be easy to document on an hourly basis.

The "project" or flat rate would be more economical for the client if you broke down how many hours you'd spend X $100/hour. That was the selling point. That type of proposal also makes it easier to get paid. If it's a long term project, you can ask for 1/3 up front, 1/3 at some pre-determined progress point, then final 1/3 upon completion. Smaller projects that might only take a couple of days are pretty easy to bill on an hourly basis, so long as you set expectations with your client regarding approximately how many hours you estimate for the project.

Hope this was helpful.


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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I need some help figuring out rates for consulting. What I have been asked to do:

-develop a seasonal menu (it's small, food is not the focus of this venture but a necessary part) that might require an ongoing relationship/commitment

-costing, pricing, help with budget

-assistance with kitchen design (working with an architect who has food service/restaurant experience

-development of staffing needs and budget, along with training

I do have experience doing this, but on a much simpler level. I need help with how to break this up into per hour and per task rates. Can anyone offer any advice?

I have found if you tell people how much you are going to charge them per hour they baulk. What we do is present the client with an Al La Carte menu, of projects. Figuring out how long each is going to take is the tough part. The first few times you will vastly underestamate some tasks, and others will be much eaisier that you thought. You will quickily figure out how to be very percise and get paid properly for your hard work.

For a season menu I give them a price usually a good chunk of change then a much lower price for each menu after that. about a quarter of original price. Don't forget that staff training goes with menu's and menu changes. Creating foolproof par/order lists for each menu will be a greeat help for them and you will get exactly what you want in way of quality.

Working with architects can be a nightmare. They often are form over function and have nevver cooked washed dishes or bartended, so they just don't get it. Stick to your guns. If you want the dish pit there it should go there, explain the reason, then make sure you get to see the final plans and sign off on them.

Best of luck

Toby Maloney, President, CCO (chief creative officer) Alchemy Consulting


Edited by Alchemist (log)

A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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