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Silicups or similar- any luck?


Freelancer015
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So last week I decided to make lots of cupcakes for a work event, and I purchased some silicone baking cups at Crate and Barrel. (I only have 2 muffin pans, but 2 ovens so I figured the silicone cups would let me bake more at a time, with the added bonus of not having to mess with the paper things.)

Well, it was a disaster. The cupcakes stuck. Had a horrible time getting them out of the cups, even after I tried spraying some of them with Pam first.

Has anyone else had a similar experience? I'm wondering if I should just try to return them, or is there any chance that these things need to be "seasoned" somehow and will work better after more uses?

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I have some silicone bakeware (bundt pan, muffin tins, tart shells, etc) and haven't had a problem with anything like a pastry or dough or bread. I have had problems with cornbread muffins sticking, and things more cake-like in texture.

I have never used the bundt pan, though.

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I got silicone cupcake/muffin cups and Dorie Greenspan's Baking book, both for Christmas. I have made her chocolate cupcakes in them a few times, and have not had a problem. I did not spray them with Pam.

l will post back as I try them for other things.

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Yes, you make a good point, finnfann. The items I have made that did not stick didn't have any lubrication added. I think it's best to leave them bare and let the non stick surface do it's job.

Just to clarify- I tried mine both ways. The first batch without Pam. When those all stuck, I tried Pam on the next batch.

I think maybe I will try a different recipe in case that could have been the problem... The recipe I used was Devil's Food Cake from the Martha Stewart Baking Handbook.

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i pretty much hate silicon bakeware EXCEPT for silpats. i don't see the advantage or the purpose of them. your product doesn't color the same and doesn't release the same. usually, whatever you have has to be chilled or frozen in order to release properly. of course some things work well, but in my opinion, it is usually the non-baked items that work well...frozen mousses, etc.

professionally, i've used the matfer brand (black and very thin and flexible) silicon products and they've worked okay for some baked goods. but i still prefer metal over silicon. from what i can see, most of the home versions don't work as well as the professional versions.

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I use them all the time. I never ever spray it with Pam, but often times will coat with butter (most recently I've taken to brushing melted butter the chilling before filling). I've used many shapes and sizes and have never had an issue. I regularly freeze and pop out for best results, but not always. I also don't cool completely - but just to room temp before popping out.

On a related note, when I use them I always use them on air baking sheets to get a more even baking.

Now, just to clarify, I think we're talking different beasts. I'm talking about the silicone muffin pans not the individual silicone muffin liners.

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First time I used mine I didn't spray them and my muffins stuck. Plus without a pan for support they ran over the edges or ended up really funny shaped. So, now I put the silicups inside a muffin tin and spray them with the pam w/flour baking spray. Works perfectly and they practically fall out of the silicups. I have other silicone pans (round cake pan and loaf pans) but I haven't had a chance to use them. Note: Muffins do not seem to rise as high and get a little darker on the bottom but come out much moister. Also, I really like the idea of not having to peel off all those paper wrappers.

--Michelle

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i pretty much hate silicon bakeware EXCEPT for silpats. i don't see the advantage or the purpose of them. your product doesn't color the same and doesn't release the same. usually, whatever you have has to be chilled or frozen in order to release properly. of course some things work well, but in my opinion, it is usually the non-baked items that work well...frozen mousses, etc.

I'm with alana on this one. Love the silpats.....hate the bakeware. Another thing about silicone bakeware is that it eventually does tear or perforate after a good amount of uses. I figure for the price of a silicone pan, I can buy a metal pan that will NEVER wear out. :wink:

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