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devlin

Copper cookware

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Okay, just bid on a Falk and won. An 8 and 3/4 inch pan, wrought iron handle, 2.8 mm thickness (tin), impeccable inside and out, gorgeous, $51.00.

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I had bid on this before I read opinions here on tin vs stainless steel, and hadn't really expected to win the bid. So anyway, I'm not displeased, although I'll have a better notion of what I'm doing next time.

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Well, it certainly is pretty! I'll be interested to hear what you think of it, if you care to post a follow-up here after you've had it for a while.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Sweet pan, sweet price.

The prefect size and shape for a serious saucepan, too. Just go easy on the tin and I'm sure you'll love it.


Notes from the underbelly

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Is that tinlined or steellined? Nice buy anyhow.

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I'm looking forward to comparing a tin-lined (which this is) to a stainless steel-lined pan, so the next one will be a copper stainless steel-lined pan, maybe a small frying pan.

I love the look of the Falk pans, the color and the material and shape of the handles, and because the tin is in superb condition, substantial, and also a sauce pan (rather than a frying pan), I'm thinking this may do just swell.

I'll keep y'all posted.


Edited by devlin (log)

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Devlin... I don't think that can be a Falk Culinair pan. To the best of my knowledge, Falk does not manufacture tin-lined copper cookware.


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Falk does not manufacture tin-lined copper cookware.

As a point of information: They do, or at least certainly did. I've been to the factory.

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Devlin... I don't think that can be a Falk Culinair pan.  To the best of my knowledge, Falk does not manufacture tin-lined copper cookware.

It's my understanding as well that they do (or maybe did). The piece is older, and it's a professional version as opposed to what I understand is the primarily American version (or the version marketed to "cooking enthusiasts" in America). The Falk Culinair line is, I believe, the copper stainless-steel line. This is a different line of Falk, an older chef's pan.

eta: It's also coming from the Netherlands, and that may be another significant difference.


Edited by devlin (log)

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The pot noted above came today. It's in beautiful condition, just as pictured, and is indeed a Falk. Just to the left of the handle, toward the top of the pan, an engraved imprint, "Falk Belgium."

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Just to provide the counter-view: I prefer the exact opposite.  I don't see any reason to spend big bucks on a hard-to-clean lid made of copper/stainless bimetal when it does not confer any cooking advantage whatsoever.  A 9.5 inch copper/stainless lid can add as much as 100 bucks to the price!  Rather, I like to buy high quality stainless steel lids of the appropriate size for 1/4 the price or less.  I also find that, as a general rule, I don't need a separate lid for every pot:  I'm not likely to use three 11-inch lids simultaneously, so I only have two.  If I really decided I needed another 11-inch lid, I could easily pick one up for 20 bucks or so.

Where can you find single/orphaned lids and do most cookware follow standard sizes? That is, if I got a 11" saute pan lid would it probably fit both an All-Clad and Calphalon pan?


Edited by sygyzy (log)

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Yes. An 11 inch lid would probably fit most 11 inch pans.

For example, my 9.5" pans are equally covered by my stainless Paderno Grand Gourmet lid and my glass Calphalon lid.

Here is a source for lids (more sizes here and elsewhere about the site).


Edited by slkinsey (log)

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Shouldn't that induction stovetop work quite well with cast iron though?

Yes, but cast iron has its own issues. ... lousy for saucepans and saute pans and other things where you need control.

true. frying is where cast iron really excells. i never understood why le creuset are making sauce pans...

And there's the issue of the surface. Bare cast iron can be seasoned and has some nonstick qualities. But it's a reactive surface that can transfer color and flavor, and it can be problematic with acidic ingredients, and it can even partially come off if you deglaze the pan.

it's my experience that, once it's properly seasoned, you can deglaze to your heart's desire. only remember to wash it in hot water, put it back on the stove to heat gently through, and add a thin coating of oil.


christianh@geol.ku.dk. just in case.

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Okay, just bid on a Falk and won. An 8 and 3/4 inch pan, wrought iron handle, 2.8 mm thickness (tin), impeccable inside and out, gorgeous, $51.00.

gallery_16410_5683_19.jpg

gallery_16410_5683_1268.jpg

gallery_16410_5683_9017.jpg

I had bid on this before I read opinions here on tin vs stainless steel, and hadn't really expected to win the bid. So anyway, I'm not displeased, although I'll have a better notion of what I'm doing next time.

devlin, that's one freaking beautiful, gorgeous piece de resistance! :wub:


christianh@geol.ku.dk. just in case.

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Okay, just bid on a Falk and won. An 8 and 3/4 inch pan, wrought iron handle, 2.8 mm thickness (tin), impeccable inside and out, gorgeous, $51.00.

gallery_16410_5683_19.jpg

gallery_16410_5683_1268.jpg

gallery_16410_5683_9017.jpg

I had bid on this before I read opinions here on tin vs stainless steel, and hadn't really expected to win the bid. So anyway, I'm not displeased, although I'll have a better notion of what I'm doing next time.

devlin, that's one freaking beautiful, gorgeous piece de resistance! :wub:

It's beautiful, isn't it? I lucked out there, and it makes me hope that I can find similarly good deals in the future. I didn't have a clue what I was bidding on when I bid, and then forgot I'd bid at all. The gods were looking kindly on me, as they sometimes do when fools rush blindly into a thing. I'm very pleased.

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WOW, perfect pan at a killer price. I am overwhelmed with jealousy right now :D

Was this off of ebay?


Edited by takadi (log)

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WOW, perfect pan at a killer price. I am overwhelmed with jealousy right now :D

Was this off of ebay?

Yes. I can't think how I got that lucky. But I'm thinking it's a good way to buy this stuff. You just have to be tenacious. Or not, come to think of it, because I'd forgotten I'd even bid on this pot and then I got the message I'd won the bid.

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Devlin... I don't think that can be a Falk Culinair pan.  To the best of my knowledge, Falk does not manufacture tin-lined copper cookware.

It's my understanding as well that they do (or maybe did). The piece is older, and it's a professional version as opposed to what I understand is the primarily American version (or the version marketed to "cooking enthusiasts" in America). The Falk Culinair line is, I believe, the copper stainless-steel line. This is a different line of Falk, an older chef's pan.

eta: It's also coming from the Netherlands, and that may be another significant difference.

Hi to all,

Haven't been here on the forum for quite some time and was looking around to see if anyone was talking about Falk. The piece that is in question is a VERY old piece and appears to be tin-lined and has copper rivets. Falk has not made tin-lined cookware for probably more than 30 years. They do some re-tinning still for pieces that are in restaurant use in Europe, though, and I suspect that is where this came from.

All Falk copper cookware is now of the same bi-metal construction, as is all stainless-lined copper cookware sold, AFAIK. There is no "Americanized" version. :biggrin:


Michael Harp

CopperPans.com

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eta: also, browsing a site selling Ruffoni, I came across this notice about some of the products: "California Prop 65 Warning: 'Products sold on this site including the brass used on the handles of Ruffoni Cookware may contain chemicals known to the state of California to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm.'"

Which of course gave me pause. Can anyone elucidate a little further?

I believe copper is also a toxic metal that can leech into acidic foods, hence the reason that copper pots and pans are lined with either tin or stainless steel (which are non- reactive toward acid). Don't know if they still make unlined copper pots (except maybe for sugar work).

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Sugar pots and polenta pots are still made in unlined copper.


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On ‎3‎/‎31‎/‎2008 at 4:13 PM, slkinsey said:

Sugar pots and polenta pots are still made in unlined copper.

 

I've been preparing my polenta in unlined copper -- as I am about to get up off my rear end and do for dinner.  But I have to ask:  what is the reason for employing unlined copper rather than tinned or stainless lined which are almost as responsive and more readily available?  I am not afeared of death by PTFE or copper poisoning but I am curious.

 

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I thought Ive read in the past that sugar-candy was made in an un=lined copper post as

 

there was some sort of reaction w the copper .  

 

I could not find this on the internet , but found this :

 

Copper cookware without coating by BAUMALU and de Buyer

Copper pots without coating are particularly suitable for making jam. Jam pots and the so-calles "Poêlon à Confiseur", which pastry chefs use to make syrup, caramel, chocolate, etc. because of their excellent heat conductivity, are not tin-plated. The melting temperature of sugar is at over 180 °C and would damage tin coatings. In order to avoid the formation of verdigris, food should be taken out of an un-plated copper pot after cooking and not left in it to cool down. 

 

I guess its for coppers heat conductivity

 

I was thinking of egg whites I guess 

 

https://www.thekitchn.com/the-science-behind-whipping-egg-whites-in-copper-bowls-221943

 

Beest me on the polenta.

 

 

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