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What are you reading these days?


helenas
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And just re-read both volumes of Tony Kushner's "Angels in America" - not only were they great performances, but they're great pieces of literature.

How did I miss this post? I saw AIA over and over again on Broadway and also love reading the script, although it's been a few years.

Harper's final monolgue about the souls of the dead forming a web that repairs the ozone - Brilliant.

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the Baker- how's your Bruce S. Feiler book?  I read his earlier

book  "Learning to Bow" , and it was one of the best books

I read about Asian culture.

I've been meaning to read Feiler's other book "Walking the

Bible".

I liked it, For me It was a bit short considering the subject ,

its interesting to see how religions have been changed by humans to suite there needs at the time.

I am going to read "walking the bible" as soon as i can it

I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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Fiction: I've just discovered Penelope Lively. . I finished "Cleopatra's Sister", tore through a book of her short stories, "The Five Thousand and One Nights" and am halfway through "Heat Wave."

Non-fiction: "Brickwork Architecture & Design", by Plumridge and Meulenkamp.

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Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. (In my defense, they've just released a movie version of this book.)

The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. (It was watching the movie that made me want to read the book. Notice a trend?)

a ten-month-old copy of The New York Review of Books

The Man Without Qualities by Robert Musil. (It's going nowhere slowly, but with a great sense of style. This is what Thomas Pynchon would've written if he had been an early 20th century German instead of a late 20th century American. So far, no movie version available.)

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I just picked up Live From New York - the oral history of Saturday Night Live. I've read up to the end of the original cast years so far, and I have to say this book is snoozeville. There is nothing here that I haven't heard before - the pressurecooker atmosphere, the drug use, the round robin romances, how big a shit Chevy Chase was (is), what a trainwreck waiting to happen Belushi was, and etc. After the original cast left there were multiple long stretches where I tuned SNL out, so I'm hoping that those parts of the book will be at least informative and interesting. But I don't hold out much hope.

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A Year on the Mekong by Edward Gargan. Last read was Dive From Clauson's Pier. And, there is always also a cookbook on my night stand (I check them out of the library before I buy).

Peter is reading me the first Harry Potter Book, and he also reads a Nate the Great book to us every night.

The kids and I go to the library once a week, if not more often. Saves on bookcases.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Re-reading "Orwell's England". "Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan" by Bix (not Bux). "Shakespeare of London" by Chute. "The Reflexive Nature of Awareness" by Williams. Re-reading "The French Laundry Cookbook" by Keller and Ruhl.

And current New Yorker, Atlantic, Harpers, NY Review of Books, Saveur.

:Shouldn't this be moved to Off-Topic Chat?:

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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OOOH,

My lovely husband just bought "Thai Food" by david thompson for me. Sigh, I had so wanted to start reading a book that is un food related.. I'm feeling a little unbalanced lately as ALL MY (non work related) READING since June has been cookbooks or food writing. And that book is going to take some time to get through! But there is no way I'm going to put it aside and read something else first!

Have any of you read White Oleander? It's being made into a movie with Michelle Pfeiffer but I can't imagine that they could possibly do justice to the book. It is engrossing, I couldn't put it down (maybe more of a woman's read than a bloke's)

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Funnily enough, Adam, I was thinking about Rabelais only this morning. I started reading Gargantua and Pantagruel a while back, and somehow got diverted from it. There's a lot about offal and pies in there as I recall, and I was just thinking I should pick it up again.

Otherwise, I am belatedly reading Gopnik's Paris to the Moon, but spoiling it by reading the food bits first. And just finished Derrida, Memoirs of the Blind - nice pictures.

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Funnily enough, Adam, I was thinking about Rabelais only this morning.  I started reading Gargantua and Pantagruel a while back, and somehow got diverted from it.  There's a lot about offal and pies in there as I recall, and I was just thinking I should pick it up again.

Oh yes most definately, it is a really rather funny, even if most of the context is not apparent most of the time. Reminds me of some of the threads on this site actually.

How could you not read a book with two of the characters called Lord Kissmyarse and Lord Suckfizzle (I think the "F" is actually a "P")?

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I try to read everything that I can get my hands on that involves food, from magazines(Gormet, Bon apetit, Gastronomica, etc.) to many types of cook books and of course the Bourdain collection. I can't get enough!!

John

JTL

Is a Member of PETA..."People Eating Tasty Animals"

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Yes indeed. Over 650 pages on intelligently written Thai recipes, culture and history. Very 'authentic' sounding recipes, loads of information about why you make a curry paste in a particular way or why some ingredients work together. Also a large section on street/hawker type food. Nice hot pink cover too.

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