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Favorite store-bought bbq sauce...


Morgan_Weber
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Big Bob Gibson's Alabama Red Sauce. I buy it by the case.

For ribs I cut it with pineapple juice and honey. For pulled pork I use just a little pineapple juice. On brisket I use it straight.

I have it shipped in from Hawgeye's.

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I just got a bottle of Stubb's bbq sauce.  My dad gave it to me after raving about it for a couple of weeks.  I had my doubts, but I'm really enjoying it--you know, for store-bought sauce...

What is your favorite?

I like the Stubb's Moppin' Sauce. Not at all sweet and a little spicy.

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I buy Stubb's for my dad...I do his shopping.

I prefer my own vinegar sauce but for a bought sauce I like Lucille's. It's a restaurant brand.

Sadly Grandma's BBQ Sauce that is no longer made. Loved that sauce.

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When I actually buy sauce instead of making it, I generally buy Gates. Come to think of it, when I MAKE sauce it is generally the Gates recipe.......

And my cocker spaniel just stopped by my office and wanted to say that her favorite is KC Masterpiece...........she does love to dig through the garbage, so I guess her taste in sauce makes sense :raz: .

edited for spelling

Edited by Zeemanb (log)

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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What I really liked was Woody's Cooking-in Sauce. It was without sugar, it was really concentrated, and you could mix it however you wanted. But it suddenly disappeared from the stores. I wondered why, until I looked at my last jar and noticed it was made in New Orleans - and it had vanished right after Hurricane Katrina... Don't know if it will ever come back....

Gac

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Yes, Woody's Cook-In Sauce is very good indeed. Very concentrated and very spicy. A little bit goes a long way. Great flavor. It's more of a marinade type of sauce than a sauce for basting and/or dipping. I used to use it a lot for marinating large pieces of beef but my tastes have changed. It can still be bought here locally.

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The only reason I haven't tried Stubb's is that "high fructose corn syrup" is #3 on it's ingredient list. I don't mind sweetness to the sauce, but why go right to the bottom of the barrel for your sweetening agent?

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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Batard~

The Moppin' sauce ingredients are:

water, distilled vinegar, soybean oil, salt, sugar, spices, xanthan gum, lemon juice, propylene glycol alginate, garlic

Hi, thanks for the response. Actually, I had been looking at the regular Stubb's BBQ sauce bottle. But if it's that good, I guess I ought to try it despite my general dislike of high fructose corn syrup.

To add to my own confusion, I really don't know the difference between all those different types of BBQ sauce and it's a bit overwhelming.

* Memphis - Memphis sauces occupy the middle ground between other styles. Based on tomatoes, vinegar, brown sugar and spices, but not too thick, these blends provide moderate amounts of sweet, heat, and tang, with a lot of flavor.[7][8]

* Kansas City – thick, reddish-brown, tomato-based with molasses[9]

* St. Louis – generally tomato-based, thinned with vinegar, sweet and spicy; it is not as sweet and thick as Kansas City-style barbecue sauce, nor as spicy-hot and thin as Texas-style

* North Carolina – three major types corresponding to region: Eastern (vinegar with pepper flakes), Piedmont (tomato-based with vinegar), and Western (tomato-based and thicker)

* South Carolina – mustard-based (central, Low Country regions of state), vinegar and black pepper (Pee Dee region), light or thick tomato (Upstate region)[10]

* Alabama – vinegar and pepper base in the northern counties; tomato/ketchup base with Mediterranean influences in the Birmingham area; sharper, unsweetened tomato/vinegar blend in the western counties around Tuscaloosa; mustard-based in the Chattahoochee River valley in the eastern part of the state; a special white mayonnaise and black pepper-based sauce is used on chicken in the area around Decatur

* Georgia – much of the state favors a ketchup base flavored with the likes of garlic, onion, black pepper, brown sugar, and occasionally bourbon; South Carolina-like mustard sauce found in areas around Savannah and Columbus

* Arkansas – thin vinegar and tomato base, spiced with pepper and slightly sweetened by molasses

* Texas – tomato-based with hot chiles, cumin, less sweet

Aghhhh!!! :wacko:

Edited by Batard (log)

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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Batard~

The Moppin' sauce ingredients are:

water, distilled vinegar, soybean oil, salt, sugar, spices, xanthan gum, lemon juice, propylene glycol alginate, garlic

Hi, thanks for the response. Actually, I had been looking at the regular BBQ sauce bottle.

To add to my own confusion, I really don't know the difference between all those different types of BBQ sauce and it's a bit overwhelming.

* Memphis - Memphis sauces occupy the middle ground between other styles. Based on tomatoes, vinegar, brown sugar and spices, but not too thick, these blends provide moderate amounts of sweet, heat, and tang, with a lot of flavor.[7][8]

* Kansas City – thick, reddish-brown, tomato-based with molasses[9]

* St. Louis – generally tomato-based, thinned with vinegar, sweet and spicy; it is not as sweet and thick as Kansas City-style barbecue sauce, nor as spicy-hot and thin as Texas-style

* North Carolina – three major types corresponding to region: Eastern (vinegar with pepper flakes), Piedmont (tomato-based with vinegar), and Western (tomato-based and thicker)

* South Carolina – mustard-based (central, Low Country regions of state), vinegar and black pepper (Pee Dee region), light or thick tomato (Upstate region)[10]

* Alabama – vinegar and pepper base in the northern counties; tomato/ketchup base with Mediterranean influences in the Birmingham area; sharper, unsweetened tomato/vinegar blend in the western counties around Tuscaloosa; mustard-based in the Chattahoochee River valley in the eastern part of the state; a special white mayonnaise and black pepper-based sauce is used on chicken in the area around Decatur

* Georgia – much of the state favors a ketchup base flavored with the likes of garlic, onion, black pepper, brown sugar, and occasionally bourbon; South Carolina-like mustard sauce found in areas around Savannah and Columbus

* Arkansas – thin vinegar and tomato base, spiced with pepper and slightly sweetened by molasses

* Texas – tomato-based with hot chiles, cumin, less sweet

Aghhhh!!! :wacko:

I love that! Nice work... So, based on that taxonomy, where does the Stubbs Moppin' Sauce fit in? According to the ingredient list posted above it contains no tomato. It is unclear to me whether "spices" can encompass mustard: I have never seen the stuff, so can someone clarify? If it contains neither mustard nor tomato, then is it an Alabama "vinegar and pepper base"?

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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