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Kerry Beal

Chocolate Course

85 posts in this topic

The molds were filled first with chocolate using a disposable piping bag. 

This seems like a good idea, but do you have to go really fast with the bag to make sure the shells have even thickness? I have been just dumping a whole lotta chocolate onto the mold and scraping it down with a spatula: it's fast, but really messy, and means I need to temper a lot more chocolate than I actually need.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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The molds were filled first with chocolate using a disposable piping bag. 

This seems like a good idea, but do you have to go really fast with the bag to make sure the shells have even thickness? I have been just dumping a whole lotta chocolate onto the mold and scraping it down with a spatula: it's fast, but really messy, and means I need to temper a lot more chocolate than I actually need.

I shouldn't take much longer than dumping, and you save a few seconds scraping. You don't need to deliberately pipe chocolate into each cavity - basically you are just running your piping bag (with a fairly large hole cut in the tip) from cavity to cavity depositing chocolate as you go. If your chocolate is in good temper and warm enough the thickness is going to be determined by how quickly you dump out the chocolate and how much you tap and scrape after dumping.

I always temper a surplus of chocolate when molding. You really need the extra mass of tempered chocolate to ensure sufficient quantities to work with easily. When I get down to the last bits in the bowl I tend to find problems with streaks because I'm scraping the bits of poorly tempered chocolate off the sides of the bowl.

Keep in mind however if you are running low on tempered chocolate - you don't need to temper a new batch. Just melt more chocolate - add it a bit at a time to the remaining tempered chocolate in your bowl - just don't go above the working temperature. The tempered chocolate in the bowl will seed the melted untempered chocolate you are adding.

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...

Stef is a highly skilled chocolatier - and of course his way is the only right way!  By the end of day one he was rolling his eyes every time I picked up anything except my camera.  When you've never done any formal chef training - you lack the knee jerk response of saying 'yes chef' and doing it his way.   

...

At pastry school in France, anytime one of us would deviate in any tiny way from the prescribed 'correct' method, I would start clapping the side of my head in mock histrionics, "Mon Dieu, Mon Dieu! Ce n'est pas classique!!!" :laugh:


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Amazing how you remember so many details!! One needs tol earn how to learn at these courses-if you don't jot down you do forget!! It is interesting how many different methods people have for doing moulds. I have developed "my" way and it seems it would be hard to change! But I will try the piping bag method! I find jet lag harder coming home (east). I think it is also connected to one's adrenaline or something similar. Back home you can let "go". You are wired and thinking and all so that also keeps you awake at the wrong times! When things settle down and if you feel like it tell us about the chocolate stores, and touring aspects. Is there a government yet or is Belgium going to be divided is also an interesting issue - but I know egullet stays away from this side of life!!!

Well welcome back to your side of the world and I just totally appreciate your thread!

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[quote

For the ganache to be cut with the guitar the proportions were 290 g cream, 40 g invert sugar, 410 g dark chocolate, 40 g butter. This was topped with a coconut ganache that used 180 g of boiron coconut pulp, 300 g white chocolate, 30 g invert sugar, 30 g cocoa butter and 40 g of dried coconut.

Am I correct in assuming that the coconut ganache does not contain cream?

Thanks for sharing all this fabulous info with us.

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Very fascinating, Kerry. I may have to try the piping bag filling technique - my molds are always a mess. And wiping off the cocoa butter with a paper towel - smart! I have 2+ lbs of light green white chocolate now because I didn't do something like that before scraping my molds.


Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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[quote

For the ganache to be cut with the guitar the proportions were 290 g cream, 40 g invert sugar, 410 g dark chocolate, 40 g butter.  This was topped with a coconut ganache that used 180 g of boiron coconut pulp, 300 g white chocolate, 30 g invert sugar, 30 g cocoa butter and 40 g of dried coconut. 

Am I correct in assuming that the coconut ganache does not contain cream?

Thanks for sharing all this fabulous info with us.

Correct. The 'cream' is the coconut puree.

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had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)

when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have

a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel

you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just

25 euros --)

http://backshop24.eshop.t-online.de/epages...Products/600238

cheers

t.


Edited by schneich (log)

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)

when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have

a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel

you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just

25 euros --)

http://backshop24.eshop.t-online.de/epages...Products/600238

cheers

t.

very nice price!


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)

when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have

a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel

you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just

25 euros --)

http://backshop24.eshop.t-online.de/epages...Products/600238

cheers

t.

very nice price!

It was a nice looking little funnel too. Small, but you don't need a big one for filling molds.

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had the same problem filling my molds, i usually suck at molds ;-)

when kerry visited me we had a stop at a bakery pro shop, they have

a nice funnel which lets you fill the molds in no time, and since its stainless steel

you can blow some hot air to keep things in a flow :-) the best thing is that its just

25 euros --)

http://backshop24.eshop.t-online.de/epages...Products/600238

cheers

t.

very nice price!

It was a nice looking little funnel too. Small, but you don't need a big one for filling molds.

I've been eying those for a while now but most of them seem to be in the $150-200 range. Love the idea of using the heat gun to keep ganache from blocking up.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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for some reason, i overlooked this thread until now! kerry, what a wonderful trip. thanks, as always, for your detailed descriptions and lots of photos!

are the photos of schneich's 'lab' on the other thread or will they be here?

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Thanks again Kerry, a few other questions

1. On demolding technique. Can you describe the 'twist' a little more?

2. on filling molded chocolates. Some books I have read to wait until the ganache is 90 or so, so that you don't detemper the shells. I take it that chef doesn't think this matters?

3. the 'piping' way vs. 'dumping' way of backing chocolates. You've tried them both, do you have one preference?

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For what its worth on these depositors, I have been told (by a very knowledgable pastry chef) that you should make sure that the one you buy does NOT have a metal seam running down the inside. I have not looked at any of the links given here, but apparently a cheaper model often has a seam running down the inside of the depositor which can stop the mixture flowing properly.

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Thanks again Kerry, a few other questions

1. On demolding technique.  Can you describe the 'twist' a little more?

I'm not Kerry, but I'm pretty sure it is like when you're loosening ice from an ice cube tray. At least, that is how I've always done it.

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for some reason, i overlooked this thread until now!  kerry, what a wonderful trip.  thanks, as always, for your detailed descriptions and lots of photos!

are the photos of schneich's 'lab' on the other thread or will they be here?

I'll put them on this topic if I am allowed.

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Look for a saucing funnel instead of confectionery and you might find a less expensive version.

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Thanks again Kerry, a few other questions

1. On demolding technique.  Can you describe the 'twist' a little more?

2. on filling molded chocolates.  Some books I have read to wait until the ganache is 90 or so, so that you don't detemper the shells.  I take it that chef doesn't think this matters?

3. the 'piping' way vs. 'dumping' way of backing chocolates.  You've tried them both, do you have one preference?

As Alana notes, it's like an icecube tray, just a little twist on both ends at the same time. Weird to hear your polycarbonate molds crackle a little.

I think that by the time the ganache is ready to pipe it is lower than 90º F. I wouldn't add the butter until I knew the mixture was fairly cool and I wouldn't be comfortable piping until it's closer to room temperature. But I think his way of incorporating the cream gradually and slowing down if the chocolate is melting too quickly - and making sure there is still some tempered chocolate in the mixture before immersion blending will ensure the cooler temperatures.

I ladle chocolate onto my molds both to make the shells and back them off. Will I change over to piping bags? - unlikely. They cost money and because unlike those working with the selmi with the big flood of chocolate, I can control the amount of chocolate I ladle. I often have a dribble on the side away from me that I can't see however. Whenever I'm teaching classes, the students always point that out - "Hey, you missed a bit!".

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For what its worth on these depositors, I have been told (by a very knowledgable pastry chef) that you should make sure that the one you buy does NOT have a metal seam running down the inside. I have not looked at any of the links given here, but apparently a cheaper model often has a seam running down the inside of the depositor which can stop the mixture flowing properly.

Probably makes sense, however my antique funnel has a seam and I haven't had any trouble with flow (of course I've only used it for pates de fruit).

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One of the items we produced was a very tasty dessert called 'Springtime'.

It consisted of a coconut dacquoise, a passion fruit cream layer, a compote of pineapple layer - held together with a white chocolate mousse.

I missed a few pictures in this series as I was tied up making something else.

gallery_34671_3115_12315.jpg

Peter, a professor at Niagara College, shows how to pipe a dacquoise. I have similar pictures of myself showing how not to pipe a dacquoise. Practice, practice, practice.

gallery_34671_3115_8179.jpg

Two different sized rings were covered on one end with plastic film, a bit of heat applied to shrink them a bit. The smaller rings were used to mold the passion fruit cream layer and the pineapple compote layer. Then into the freezer. The larger rings were used to compose the dessert with the mousse. The entire dessert was then placed in the freezer until time for decoration.

gallery_34671_3115_1092.jpg

Large dabs of chocolate were piped onto acetate. A second piece of acetate was applied, notice the technique of putting down one end first. This same technique was used when applying transfer sheets to chocolates coming off the enrobing line. This prevents bubbles and uneven application.

gallery_34671_3115_6762.jpg

The two pieces of acetate are then carefully pulled apart from the center out and laid flat.

gallery_34671_3115_11839.jpg

Grated coconut was applied, then the acetate placed in a trough to curve slightly.

gallery_34671_3115_4659.jpg

Dark chocolate was applied to a piece of acetate, then white chocolate that had been further whitened with some titanium dioxide white colouring, then sprinkled with coconut while still damp. Cuts were made before it fully crystallized to make decorations for the dessert. In some larger demisphere molds the same thing was done, dark chocolate, followed by the white chocolate and then coconut.

gallery_34671_3115_12244.jpg

The dessert is removed from the freezer and demolded. The white chocolate glacage is applied.

gallery_34671_3115_6398.jpg

The glacage flows so nicely that it makes glazing look so effortless.

gallery_34671_3115_11420.jpg

The final result with all the chocolate decorations applied.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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Another option that i've done in the past, is to contact your local vo tech or trade school, ask them if they've got a stainless class that might be interested in making a custom piece to your specifications as an individual project if you pay for the raw materials...

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Another option that i've done in the past, is to contact your local vo tech or trade school, ask them if  they've got a stainless class that might be interested in making a custom piece to your specifications as an individual project if you pay for the raw materials...

What a brilliant idea. You could get them to make all sorts of things.

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Stef was adamant that colours for airbrushing are not simply a mixture of the desired colour and cocoa butter.  His yellow contains yellow dye, some red dye, milk chocolate and cocoa butter.  This gives an excellent yellow.  Red contains red, a bit of blue, dark chocolate and cocoa butter.  He uses the immersion blender to combine the mixture.  The mixture is allowed to sit in the warming cupboard for 24 hours before use.  A bucket of cocoa butter is kept in the 40º C warming cupboard so there is always melted cocoa butter when required. 

How does this compare with the premixed colors from Chef-Rubber?

If it's an improvement, do you have formulas for improving various colors?

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