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LizD518

Country-Style Pork Ribs

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I have a package of countrystyle pork ribs in my refridgerator and I am trying to determine the best way to treat them...Shouldn't be too hard a prospect, but I want to make sure I make the best of them.

My question is: What is the best way to cook this cut? I can't remember at the moment if it is on the bone or off, but it is cut up into four good size (4-6oz) "fingers" that might be good to brown and then give it a quick braise. Would it be too tough if I grilled it? I also have a stove-top smoker that I usually just use for chicken, but that might be fun too. I have actually done spareribs in there for three hours (they came out awesome).

I have lots of different herbs & spices that I can use, as well as various either asian ingredients or bbq sauce to do some sort of glaze, perhaps...

Any ideas?

Help!

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I think this is a very forgiving cut of meat. I've marinated and grilled until barely medium (yummy) and also cooked them long and slow, also yummy. I've found them to be flavorful and tender either way. I think that middle ground of just -overcooked would make them tough but on either side.....

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On busy days I like to marinate them in garlic, ginger, & soy sauce, then steam them for 25-30 mins. They taste especially good served with rice and steamed napa (Chinese) cabbage.

I like them steamed with dried salted black bean, also.

http://steamykitchen.com/blog/2007/11/12/c...ack-bean-sauce/

Not a super-tender cut of meat, but not tough either. I like 'em.

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It's sliced pork butt. I usually treat them like meaty ribs and smoke them. When I make a spaghetti sauce I brown them along with sausage & meatballs before I make the sauce. They fall apart in the sauce after a couple of hours so you get a little pork in every bite.

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This was my mom's traditional cut of choice for "ribs" --she would spread these out in a baking pan and cover with barbecue sauce and cook covered until tender, then take the top off and blast with the broiler to brown.

Not high class by any means but it was yummy.

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I'd go the Okinawan Rafute route...

Braise...

Boil...Rinse...boil again and rinse... about 40 mins.

Simmer in equal parts of Soy, Sugar, Awamari/Sake... garlic 2 cloves for about 1-2 hours and serve with rice.

-Jimmy

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All of these sound wonderful. I'm making Chile Verde with some tonight , as we speak...............

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My favorite easy way with these is low and slow in a pan with some apple juice or cider for the liquid... an hour or two before you want to take them out, slide the meat towards one end of the pan and fill the other end with good kraut... sprinkle a little brown sugar and some of the pan juice over the kraut...

Serve with baked sweet potatoes and a salad or some fruit... It's one of our favorite cold weather meals (down here, cold weather means anything below 40 degrees F!)

Pam

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cook em like spare/baby back ribs. smoke/cook at 250 for 3-4 hrs. then wrap in foil for a few hrs at 225 til done....Or cut the meat off and make sausage...fresh or dry cured...

its shoulder /butt and fatty and tasty...

Bud

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My mom's specialty is pork roast and sauerkraut. Once in awhile she'll use the country-style ribs instead of a pork roast. She prefers the ribs with the bone in them since it gives a better flavor to the final dish.

The ribs are roasted low and slow. About halfway through the roasting she'll put the sauerkraut in the bottom of the pan with some water and put the meat on top to finish roasting.

The meat usually turns out tender enough to shred into the sauerkraut before being served.

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I'd go the Okinawan Rafute route...

Braise...

Boil...Rinse...boil again and rinse... about 40 mins.

Simmer in equal parts of Soy, Sugar, Awamari/Sake... garlic 2 cloves for about 1-2 hours and serve with rice.

-Jimmy

I cooked these tonight and they are terrific! A really nice treatment for an inexpensive cut.

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For the boneless country style ribs, I will often marinate them in fish sauce, lemon grass, and sugar (or Splenda) for a day or so, and then cook them over indirect heat in a Weber at around 600 degrees. Makes great lemongrass roast pork.

(Yes, it really does get around 600 degrees. Half the kettle is empty, and the other half is roaring when I start the cooking)

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Last weekend I cut 2# of country style ribs into 1" cubes, marinated them in a cumin/ancho/grated orange peel/garlic paste with cognac and olive oil, browned and braised with mirepoix, bouquet garni, bay leaf, chicken stock and white wine. Halfway through I added some white navy beans and shredded napa cabbage. Very hearty one pot meal, and my guests enjoyed it over couscous very much.

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I like to lightly coat them with a rub made up of various herbs then cook in a low (250F) oven for about half an hour.

Then they go on a hot BBQ and get coated with BBQ sauce, not too much. Coat one side, cook, coat the other side, turn over, cook.

That's it. Enjoy.

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My mom's specialty is pork roast and sauerkraut. Once in awhile she'll use the country-style ribs instead of a pork roast. She prefers the ribs with the bone in them since it gives a better flavor to the final dish.

The ribs are roasted low and slow. About halfway through the roasting she'll put the sauerkraut in the bottom of the pan with some water and put the meat on top to finish roasting.

The meat usually turns out tender enough to shred into the sauerkraut before being served.

I usually add sliced onions to the kraut, as well as a bunch of garlic and white pepper, and do the layering style, kraut and onions, meat, kraut and onions. Pour white wine or beer over, cover with foil and roast at 325 for a couple of hours. Yummy, especially with nice rich mashed potatoes and butter.

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I use country ribs almost exclusively instead of a hunk of pork shoulder, both because I'm usually only cooking for one or two, and also because they cook so much faster than a shoulder roast. I generally do mine in the pressure cooker, either with tomatillos and poblanos for chili verde, or as faux pulled pork, or with soy sauce, garlic and ginger for Asian style pork over rice.

My supermarket has started packaging pork loin as country ribs, which I find distressing and confusing. They're still packaging shoulder as well, and I asked the meat manager not to stop carrying the shoulder ribs, so I hope they don't. Has anyone else encountered loin country ribs?

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