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eG Foodblog: FabulousFoodBabe - Brand New Kitchen, Same Old Husband


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Allrightie then. Enchiladas for dinner. I'm sure these are not authentic, among other things, but my family loves them.

This recipe makes a 9x12 pan, 12 corn tortillas. The sauce is a quart plus one cup.

For the sauce:

1 1/2 c half & half

1 large egg

1/2 cup salsa, or tomatillos and salsa

gallery_28660_5638_4484.jpg

Lookie! I got TWO double-yolks in two eggs in a row!

gallery_28660_5638_17725.jpgThis is almost as good as the red pepper within a red pepper I found last month.

Anyway. Beat the eggs until foamy;

gallery_28660_5638_8259.jpgbe sure that the eggs are completely blended; no streaks of white should remain. Then, whisk in the half & half and stir in the salsa.

gallery_28660_5638_3127.jpg

This can be done early in the day; cover and keep cold.

Ladle some of the sauce to cover the bottom of a greased baking dish before you start with the tortillas.

For the filling:

Shred 4-5 chicken breasts. Add cheese and minced onion. I don't measure; I used parmesan, cheddar and jack, and about 1/2 cup of onion this time.

gallery_28660_5638_38965.jpg

Get 7 or 8" corn tortillas; heat some oil on a griddle or in a pan, and fry them until they become pliable.

gallery_28660_5638_3793.jpg

Put about 1/3 cup of filling in each tortilla, roll up, and place it seamed-side down in the dish.

When i'm done, I scatter any leftover filling over the filled tortillas

gallery_28660_5638_17235.jpgand ladle the remaining sauce over the top.

gallery_28660_5638_18989.jpg

Bake at 350 for about 30 minutes; if it gets too brown on top, cover loosely with foil.

I can smell them now. With brown rice and black beans, mmm!

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Tomorrow, I start cooking for the party in earnest. I've got some appointments out in the morning, and hope to swing by a crepery that opened last year, and grab some brunch.

One of the things we had to solve in this kitchen was how to store my recipes and workbooks. I didn't want bookshelves; my office is about 20 steps away and is loaded with cookbooks, workbooks, notebooks, clippings, you name it. But I did want a place where I could put a book I was working from, and some way to keep the hundreds of index cards I use close at hand.

The side of the refrigerator closest to the range wasn't being used, so I asked the architect to find a way to use that.

Here's what they did:

gallery_28660_5638_29669.jpg

The shelves are of the same etched glass as the cabinet doors in the wet bar. The rods hold s-hooks, which hold my recipe index cards (the rods can flip up and out of the way if necessary). The shelves are shallow; perfect for my clipboards and notebooks, and smallish cookbooks, too. It's lit on the sides and the top; when I turn them on, the photo isn't as sharp as I'd like. It's beautiful.

Since I'm a little height-challenged, the top shelf could be used for whatever I wanted. I love this clock:

gallery_28660_5638_12900.jpgThe tongue wags back and forth, like a second-hand!

Until tomorrow,

Fabby

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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As much as I love enchiladas, I've never attempted making them because they look too labor-intensive. Thanks for the tutorial. That looks like something I could do!

I too would love to see some of Snaky Boy and Cool Flame. Perhaps Queen O'Mean could be added in? :raz:

The shelf is a clever solution, and it looks terrific. I love the clock! We have a cat clock where the tail and eyes wags back and forth with the pendulum. At least, they used to do.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Good news! The puffer fish survived its first night in our tank and is now safely in the tank at the high school. I can't say the same for our rug and floor; I think the kid spilled 10 gallons of sea water on it getting the fish in and out. (he mopped it all up; time will tell the effects). Anyway, houses are for living in. No new rugs until the puppy is trained, anyway :rolleyes:

One of the things that was important to me in this new kitchen is the cleanup area. I originally wanted something closed and away from the cooking/living areas, but in order to do that, we'd have to add a boxed-in area in the current space, or go out the back of the house. No, and no. Here's what the architect came up with:

gallery_28660_5638_6917.jpgOn the left is a pass-through, so we don't have to walk around the end of the cabinets to put glassware into the wet bar area, or to bring dirty dishes to the cleanup sinks. (The sinks are very deep, so the top handle is on a dummy cabinet. One of Firstie's buds pulled on it and popped it -- no biggie, I thought. I was ready to use some putty to keep it there, but then the architects swooped in and the contractor concurs: they want to fix it the right way. Shriek! I'm inclined to stick some putty in it and forget about it.)

I also love my hand sink with a foot pedal.

gallery_28660_5638_760.jpgThat's another thing that every other architect and contractor I met told me I couldn't have. It's one of the best decisions I made. One that was a so-so decision, but which I insisted on, is the thing I stole from Jacques Pepin's kitchen -- the speed rack in the area next to the range. If I didn't have a dog who is a pleasure-seeker, this would be ideal for cooling baked things. Putting a door on it kind of defeats the purpose. As it is when I have to use it and the dog is awake, I just roll it into the cleanup area of the kitchen and block it off.

I still love it, with a great big however attached.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Snakey Boy is a pit viper.  He wears a toque and an apron, and only bites when he is provoked and no other methods of resolution work. Snakey-Boy works at a snack bar.  I think he owns the place.  He feeds the homeless for free, he discounts his prices for poor people, and only uses the finest ingredients for his offerings.  After every episode of Snakey Boy, he gives the big thumbs-up to the readers. 

All Hail Snakey-Boy!  He often hung out with Cool Flame, a sunglass-wearing bit of fire who regularly drank gasoline and burped his opponents with a firey blast.

I'm very sure I'll be blamed for this one day. :wacko:

Any chance you could scan up some of your son's comics?  I think we need to actually view Snakey Boy, now.

Seconded, thirded and fourthed! He sounds like one cool viper -- a snake I wouldn't mind encountering on a plane.

Interesting way your son channels his mom, too! It's a good thing there's no accountant character in that strip! :biggrin:

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Tell me more about the sink with the pedal--I've led a sheltered life maybe, but I've never seen that!

It's something I've wanted for a long time. Basically, it has a faucet (and handles, more for effect than anything else), and the foot pedals under the cabinet control the water. I don't have to touch anything when I have gunk on my hands, or when I'm holding something else. I'm sure you have seen them, in doctors' offices :smile: I worked in a very fancy kitchen with a gazillion cool things in it, but there was not one single foot pedal sink in the place.

All the sinks in the cooking and cleanup area are integrated stainless. There had to be a cutout for the pedals (which were designed to comfortably fit my Danksos), but the plumber said it wasn't a big deal to install -- and I'd heard nothing but NO from the last group of contractors I worked with.

It's really one of my favorite parts of the kitchen.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Storage! Separate work spaces! This baby has it all, and I'm getting used to it slowly.

This area which we alternately call the wet bar and pass, has a Miele speed oven (wonderful!), a Miele coffee center that I've already showed, and a Thermador warming drawer, all stacked on one side with cabinets above, below, and to one side.

gallery_28660_5638_14923.jpgDirectly next to the sink is a Fisher&Paykel diswasher drawer, which we use for overflow, crystal, and some barware. We also have a three-zone wine storage refrigerator and a beverage cooler on the side facing the oven/coffee/drawer:

gallery_28660_5638_15939.jpg

And, of course, the pass-through into the cleanup area.

gallery_28660_5638_5101.jpg

It's a very cool setup; I don't get in anyone's way and they stay out of mine when I'm working. Plus, this area has all the fun appliances that talk to the user and beep and look really nice, so Mr.Foodbabe and the Bambinos love to use it.

We also store some dishes in this area, and I love these Blum Orga-Line Dish inserts ...

gallery_28660_5638_9138.jpg

Since about half my dishes are square, I'd love to find one of these that isn't round but this works fine for now.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Today was Cake Day -- I tripled the aforementioned Devil's Food Cake recipe and used an 18 x 12 pan. We're going to have 30-40 people on Saturday, so I'll probably make another layer cake or something. I dunno.

I used to think that when my boys grew up, I would be able to work uninterrupted for more than 5 minutes. Here's what distracted me during cake-time:

gallery_28660_5638_359.jpgHe's holding Mr. Piggy, who oinks when he bites down on him. He stands there making MP oink, and when I look up, he wags his tail and growls, which is basset talk for "chase me around the house."

I was way stricter with my kids.

Afterward, I made my favorite pan prep, which was taught to me by the ladies at Edwards Cake Supply in Modesto (my shop was down the strip mall from theirs).

Equal parts by volume APF, corn or veg oil, and shortening. Mix it together.

gallery_28660_5638_5876.jpg

I use this on the pan's bottom, line it with parchment (just the bottom), and then prep the top of the parchment as well. Nothing on the sides.

Then, I mixed boiling water into the cocoa, and whisked until it was smooth.

gallery_28660_5638_13894.jpggallery_28660_5638_5115.jpg

While it was cooling to room temp (which took for-freaking ever, it seemed), I whisked eggs and vanilla together. When the cocoa-water mix was at room temp, I whisked about 1/4 of the mixture into the eggs/vanilla.

gallery_28660_5638_12479.jpg

Flour/sugar/salt/soda went into the KitchenAid bowl with a paddle attachment; I added the butter and beat the heck out of it!

gallery_28660_5638_17848.jpg

After beating in the eggs/cocoa mixture in three portions, the batter was ready to be tested (mmmm!). And then, into the prepared pan.

gallery_28660_5638_17504.jpg

I baked it at 350 for about a half hour, and then at 325 for 15 minutes more with the convection fan on, and then gave it another few minutes without the fan. It looks dense and beautiful. It's cooling now, and I'll give you all a peek of my freezer when it's time to wrap it and put it in.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Tell me more about the sink with the pedal--I've led a sheltered life maybe, but I've never seen that!

It's something I've wanted for a long time. Basically, it has a faucet (and handles, more for effect than anything else), and the foot pedals under the cabinet control the water. I don't have to touch anything when I have gunk on my hands, or when I'm holding something else. I'm sure you have seen them, in doctors' offices :smile: I worked in a very fancy kitchen with a gazillion cool things in it, but there was not one single foot pedal sink in the place.

All the sinks in the cooking and cleanup area are integrated stainless. There had to be a cutout for the pedals (which were designed to comfortably fit my Danksos), but the plumber said it wasn't a big deal to install -- and I'd heard nothing but NO from the last group of contractors I worked with.

It's really one of my favorite parts of the kitchen.

I would have for sure gotten this in our new kitchen had I found out about it before hand. I think one of the popular models is called "Tapmaster". Is that what you got?

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Is it possible to post larger pictures? My old eyes are straining to see some of the details in your kitchen, and I don't want to miss anything. :biggrin:

I'm glad that you are enjoying the speed oven. Be sure to handle the glass tray carefully, though. We've had ours for a year and a half and already broken two trays. They are NOT cheap. (The last one was $250 plus shipping, I think). We've also had a lot of service problems with ours (in fact, the microwave function is not working at all right now, but hopefully ours is just a lemon). When it was working, it was great. For example, you can take a frozen-solid 9 x 13 casserole (lasagne, etc.) and using the Masterchef combination microwave and bake function, it will be golden-brown-bubbling-perfectly-done in about 42 minutes.

What did you have for breakfast/lunch today?

PS The best dog name that I ever heard was "Hoover". As in, when something falls on the floor in the kitchen or dining room, "Here, Hoover!" :laugh:

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I used to think that when my boys grew up, I would be able to work uninterrupted for more than 5 minutes.  Here's what distracted me during cake-time:

gallery_28660_5638_359.jpgHe's holding Mr. Piggy, who oinks when he bites down on him.  He stands there making MP oink, and when I look up, he wags his tail and growls, which is basset talk for "chase me around the house."

Boy, I can relate! Our Siberian husky gives me about 5 minutes to relax when I come through the door before he's pushing his latest favorite stuffed toy (always squeakectomized after the first 10 minutes) in my face. "Here! Pull my toy!" There's no ignoring him until he gets in a good round of tug-of-war, chase-around-the-house, and catch.

I have a serious case of kitchen envy.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Foot taps rock.

And if you are a trip-prone person, often the footpedal can be 'flipped' up out of the way until needed (using the toe of ones shoe), or the whole thing can be recessed enough to keep it out of the line of fire.

I would think they would be relatively simple to retrofit. I've seen it done in labs often enough.

Brilliance to have one in the kitchen. A thing of beauty and a joy forever (as long as you remember beauty is internal!).

How many square feet is your delightful kitchen?

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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I would have for sure gotten this in our new kitchen had I found out about it before hand.  I think one of the popular models is called "Tapmaster".  Is that what you got?

Nope -- it's Pedalworks, and the faucet is KWC. I think it's actually pretty easy to install, if you feel like going back through renovation the fun again! (As if -- of course, you had one of the fastest renovations I have ever known and I salaam to you :cool: )

(I was not clear earlier -- I worked in a fancy restaurant kitchen that had no foot pedals on the sinks. Anywhere. Weird. )

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Is it possible to post larger pictures?  My old eyes are straining to see some of the details in your kitchen, and I don't want to miss anything.  :biggrin:
Done!
I'm glad that you are enjoying the speed oven.  Be sure to handle the glass tray carefully, though.  We've had ours for a year and a half and already broken two trays.  They are NOT cheap.  (The last one was $250 plus shipping, I think).
ACK!

And I'll be careful about not letting any glitchy things go unchecked. Thanks for that bit of advice.

What did you have for breakfast/lunch today?
No breakfast for Fabby (snif) andit was nearly lunchtime when I got home from the Doc. And then I had someone here working around the kitchen and I just didn't eat anything. I can hear my trainer bitching at me for this!

For dinner, I whipped up some chicken and rice with cherry tomato, shiitake, and gorgonzola sauce for Mr. FB. Bambino wanted a burrito, but a yicky beef one. No photos of that but honestly, they're not real photogenic :unsure:

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Tell me more about the sink with the pedal--I've led a sheltered life maybe, but I've never seen that!

It's something I've wanted for a long time. Basically, it has a faucet (and handles, more for effect than anything else), and the foot pedals under the cabinet control the water. I don't have to touch anything when I have gunk on my hands, or when I'm holding something else. I'm sure you have seen them, in doctors' offices :smile: I worked in a very fancy kitchen with a gazillion cool things in it, but there was not one single foot pedal sink in the place.

All the sinks in the cooking and cleanup area are integrated stainless. There had to be a cutout for the pedals (which were designed to comfortably fit my Danksos), but the plumber said it wasn't a big deal to install -- and I'd heard nothing but NO from the last group of contractors I worked with.

It's really one of my favorite parts of the kitchen.

After I fainted from envy after reading this, I'm up and SO impressed!!!!

*sigh* now I'm having sink envy.

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I found another cool bit of storage in my pass: the tall cabinets next to the oven/coffe center/warming drawer. I'd considered having just tall cabinets with room for brooms and such, but these pull-out shelves are much better.

gallery_28660_5638_8583.jpg

That shelf holds cofee beans, some popcorn and I think Instant Breakfast (kid likes it for those rare days he doesn't want to spend much time eating.)

The cake is muy dense. OMG, it's like fudge, I think. I put it on a cake-board and wrapped it tight, and into the freezer.

I have one of those monster Sub-Zero 48inchers, and I love it. Here's the left side, which is all freezer:

gallery_28660_5638_343.jpg The cake is on the second shelf down, sitting atop some pint containers of stock, tomato sauce, etc. Yes, that's pigs-in-a-blanket on top! Wieners Wellington, we call them. There's also the requisite Eggo waffles for the Mister, who can't start his day without one.

The shelf below the cake has ice cream -- I think that's Americone Dream -- quarts of veal and beef stock, some frozen Black Bean Soup, and some frozen ground beefs. The bottom shelf has my big containers of stock, as well as shells and bones for more stock, and scraps of meat that will eventually become sausage.

Of the bottom drawers, the first holds fish food, and now has IQF shrimp for Saturday

gallery_28660_5638_60271.jpg

And the bottom drawer is an icemaker; I added a 3-pan to hold more ice. I had considered getting a separate icemaker, but we really don't need it in this climate and this ice machine does a great job.

gallery_28660_5638_25240.jpg

Refrigerator shots are much better in the daylight, so I'll get to those in the a.m.

Hope to have more in the way of actual eating in Chappaqua these next few days, when I'm done waiting for deliveries and workmen.

Arrivederci, eGullet!

Fabster

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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How many square feet is your delightful kitchen?

Uh .. uh ... I dunno. :unsure: I have to ask my architect!

Seriously, the space we used to have was something like 13 x 16. We are using some of what used to be a small sitting room. We got rid of a wall (which is when I fell in love with the flitch beams :wub::wub: ).

I'm going to post some before/after photos tomorrow. It doesn't look like the same house. If tomorrow is as beautiful weather-wise as we are promised, the light will show off the windows, the cabinets, and everything, so nicely.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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I'm glad that you are enjoying the speed oven.  Be sure to handle the glass tray carefully, though.  We've had ours for a year and a half and already broken two trays.  They are NOT cheap.  (The last one was $250 plus shipping, I think).
ACK!

And I'll be careful about not letting any glitchy things go unchecked. Thanks for that bit of advice.

Our mishaps occurred when the glass tray was not pushed all the way back into the oven before the door was shut. So, Miele considered it "owner misuse" and refused to replace the item without payment. Ahem. Anyway, my suggestion is to just be darn careful with the trays, because IMHO, they shattered rather easily and without sufficient justification. (Especially considering the original cost of the appliance!)

No breakfast for Fabby (snif) andit was nearly lunchtime when I got home from the Doc.  And then I had someone here working around the kitchen and I just didn't eat anything.  I can hear my trainer bitching at me for this!

Oh, boy. . . you are in big trouble lady!!! :laugh::laugh: Seriously, you know better, right??

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gallery_28660_5638_359.jpgHe stands there making MP oink, and when I look up, he wags his tail and growls, which is basset talk for "chase me around the house."

LOL, LOL, my Rosie does the same thing with Larry the Lobster, who obviously doesn't oink. LtL squeeeeeeeeeeks. When I get home from work, I usually make a bee-line into the, erm, facilities, since I've typically been on the freeway for at least 45 minutes. Rosie follows me in with LtL, squeeeeeeeeeking all the time. It's miniature poodle mix talk for "pay attention to MEEEEEEEEEE !"

BTW, I LOVED :wub::wub: that clock !

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Oh, boy. . . you are in big trouble lady!!!  :laugh:  :laugh:  Seriously, you know better, right??

Yeah, I do. As I've said before, I had gestational diabetes with both pregnancies and more nutritional counseling than anyone should have to take!

Yesterday couldn't be helped; I did pick at a chicken breast (poached) and had a diet Pepsi. I didn't think it was too horrible to have to miss coffee, because Peet's hadn't yet delivered and we only had grocery-store coffee beans. :shock: Mr. Foodbabe drank it anyway, but we all did the happy dance when the box arrived yesterday afternoon. We try to get a special blend every now and then; this is what we got in addition to Major Dickason's.

gallery_28660_5638_11904.jpgThis is the Yemeni Village Sampler. And no, I haven't tried the cat-poop coffee. I do have my limits!

So, breakfast today was a wonderful cappuccino, some of my honey-wheat bread toasted with peanut butter and preserves. Mr. Foodbabe currently loves Eggo Flip-Flop waffles in brown sugar and cinnamon, so I've moved to whole wheat bread. I mentioned in the previous blog that this type of a.m. petit breakfast is what I had every day during two pregnancies: fiber, protein, fat, and a little bit of flavor.

gallery_28660_5638_1197.jpgWe really really like our glass mugs: They are Pessimist's Mugs, and say "This Mug is Half Empty." We get things like that from Despair, Inc. Yes, I know, it's juvenile but it just cracks us up. Our Coffee Mug collection grows by the day!

When things calm down a little bit in town, I'm going in. Sounds a little like a battle, doesn't it? :biggrin: But with commuters and school buses early and dance classes and Ladies At Lunch later, if you don't want to gouge your eyes out, you have to time it just so. Chappaqua is still working on parking issues.

Plus, if I wait a little longer, I won't get the salt bagel at the Chappaqua Town Market, which I'm craving, and which will no doubt result in a major bloat that will (a)prevent me from fitting into my clothing for dinner tonight, and (b) make Mr. Foodbabe's loving gaze turn to one of horror and, yes, despair.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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I love the basset nose peeking into the ice container :wub: .  Our pug patrols the kitchen diligently and he is in the edge of every picture we take.  We say that he is always saying, "I could eat".

Kim

Too funny, Kim! J-L just loves to be in the middle of things, too. His first task in the morning is to snuffle around the kitchen floor, looking for crumbs. Hoover, yes!

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Today is Mr. Foodbabe's Birthday! He looked fabulous and I gave him a pinch -- he doesn't *feel* 50 to me!

Dinner tonight is at 42, in the new Ritz-Carlton in White Plains. It's on the 42nd floor (how clever :raz: ). Seriously, we hear it's wonderful. We were going to go to Blue Hill at Stone Barns but he changed his mind at the last minute and, well, it's really not about me. (BH@SB is one of my favorites; I extern'ed there and then some, and Dan still treats me like royalty when we go. Plus, he said there was some great new stuff in the greenhouse ... :sad: )

Another person who did his externship with me at BH, but from a different school, is part of the restaurant group that owns 42. We bonded because we were both grownups (*our* talk for "older than most of the cooks' parents), and because he's a nice guy.

So, time to scale the roll dough and get that proofing before I head into bustling Chappaqua. I also hear J-L and his own "Larry the Lobster" -- but his makes a bubbling sound when he bites it!

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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So earlier,I went into town. First stop was a "gourmet kitchen and crepery(sp?) that has been open for a few months, by a chef who owns another restaurant in town. I've heard amazing things about it. I walked in, and one person who looked lost was working. Three people were eating in and there was almost no food in the cases, and not another employee or sound in the place. I asked for a menu but they didn't have one. I asked about crepes but he didn't seem to understand me. I am not sure it would be fair to name the place or razz on them because it just didn't fit with what I'd heard about the place so many times before and honestly, the other restaurant is really nice. Bad day, maybe? I've had 'em. But I'll get back there another time, maybe tomorrow or Saturday.

Up the road is a place that has been reported on several times, because the owner decided to make her cafe into a"Water Bar." Yes, I know, WTF, but I wanted to check it out. I think she's gotten ink in the Times and certainly in the local papers, for selling expensive waters in fancy bottles. Since my breakfast down the road was thwarted, I stopped in this cafe. It's warm, cozy, ten seats. Okay, it's tiny and has lots and lots and lots of stuff for sale, from Bodum press pots to chocolate-covered sunflower seeds to honey sticks to, ahem, water. The menu seemed to be mostly wraps and a few breakfast dishes.

Only one person was working: the owner. I asked for two croissants with jam and Nutella. She was talking to some salesmen as she prepared this and at one point, set off the smoke alarm. Told me not to worry, it happens all the time, and mentioned to one of the salesmen, "that's what I get when I try to make garlic bread in something that's not made for garlic bread."

Well, what set off the smoke alarm was the croissant she sold me and charged me for. gallery_28660_5638_8196.jpg Of course I didn't check the food before I got home. Who in the world would sell a burnt croissant to someone, while that person was standing right there?

The questioin is: WWFeGD? (What Would Fellow eGers Do?)

I'm inclined to do nothing. This was done by the owner, while I was standing right there in her kitchen. This is the way she does business, this is the way she respects the food she sells, and the customers she sells it to. If it were an overworked staff with people lined out the door, I'd feel a little differently about it. Not much, but some.

What would you-all do?

Edited by FabulousFoodBabe (log)
"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
    • By shain
      It's been more than a year in which international travel was challenging to impossible, but gladly this is changing, as more countries are able to vaccinate their population.
      Greece had managed to return to a state of near normality, and opted to allow vaccinated individuals to enter. And so I decided to go on a slightly spontaneous vacation (only slightly, we still had almost a month for planning). To the trip I was joined by my father, to whom I owed some good one-on-one time and was able to travel on a short-ish notice.
       
       
      Many people are yet unable to travel, and many countries are suffering quite badly from the virus, and therefore I considered if I should wait some time with this post. However, I hope that it will instead be seen with an optimistic view, showing that back-to-normal is growing ever closer.
       
       
      We returned just a few days ago, and it will take me some time to organize my photos, so this is a teaser until then.
       
       
       
       
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