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eG Foodblog: FabulousFoodBabe - Brand New Kitchen, Same Old Husband


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Oh! I almost forgot my basset hound naming suggestion!

Somehow, when thinking of a vaguely British/European-sounding two-syllable name, my brain keeps popping up with that Monty Python routine about Doug and Dinsdale Piranha, in which the hallucinatory giant hedgehog Spiny Norman goes stalking through the streets of London calling out the crazier brother by name: "DINSDALE! DINSDALE!" ... Erm. It's the name "Dinsdale" I'm suggesting for your new basset. Though "Spiny Norman" could be fun if you ever adopted one of those cute little pygmy hedgehogs.

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LOL mizducky !

Ever notice how these foodblogs have the effect (sometimes) of catapulting you back into the past? I remember when I was in Philly in O school having a neighborhood little white guinea rat dog that we called Demented Samuel. Not his name, just to us :wink:

I wanna know ( having just moved into a new house and moved everything in my kitchen at least twice, as I figured out where it REALLY belonged) since you planned your kitchen with such exactitude does it let you move in once and truly find that everything is in its right place?

*heaven*

:rolleyes:

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Giving another Southern California shoutout ! Yah Fabby ! And many happy returns to Mr. Fabby, and from someone 2.5 years on the *other* side of 50, yes, I'll agree, 50 is the new 30. *DAMN* my mind doesn't feel 50 !

Let me cast my vote on the puppy name (ohhhhhhhhh, what a doll he is.........). I'd vote for Remy ! Keeping in the French theme, and the food theme (gotta love "Ratatouille"). Says the woman who once named her beagle after her favorite restaurant. And who currently owns a fur baby named "Snickers". And whose other current fur baby's favorite toy is a stuffed, squeaky lobster. Named Larry. Yes, Larry The Lobster.

Or, in homage to your favorite footwear, you could name the new babe Manolo.....

We won't discuss the kitchen lust I'm having. Blog on FFB, blog on.

Edited by Pierogi (log)

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Really enjoying your blog so far!

As for animal names, I love ironic names, i.e., the doberman named trinket, my fluffy little mutt who loved everyone on the planet was named Hannibal.

In light of that, I pick the name Brutus. :raz:

---------------------------------------

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Pierogi, nice idea about the name! Or, he could be Jimmy (Choo). ::adding to the list::

christine007, my son had three scorpions named Whiskers, Mittens, and Paul. He was going to name one Fluffy, but said it just looked more like a Paul. Whatever that looks lik!

dvs, I'll tell more about the cooking classes later today, when i'm at home waiting to sign for the fish who shall arrive in the afternoon. Not the eating kind, unfortunately.

marmish, what a sweet pea! He looks like Cisco one of J-L's buddies in the 'hood.

dockhl, LOL about the exacting nature of this kitchen. I had a whole schematic done for what went where ... as you can see from this photo, the Post-its on the shelf pans prove that I'm not even ready to P-Touch everything!

gallery_28660_5638_3520.jpg

This is great; I just scrub the pans and hang 'em up.

I am making Mr. FB's cake for the party as well, and am trying to decide if I should bake it today and freeze it to decorate Friday. Any thoughts? It'll be Devil's Food (using The Cake Bible's recipe), and decorated in white and (of course) Duke Blue.

Any ideas on what we can put into a pinata are also very welcome!

When I come back from the errands, I'll tell the saga of Snakey-Boy.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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I adore your drawer canisters! how wonderful they look perfect and the lids look solid so you would not be spilling into each others spaces! .....I have three drawers dedicated to foodstuffs because I can not and do not have room on the counters anymore.. it is not ideal at all because everything in the drawers gets mixed up and then the bottom of the drawer looks like a compost heap!

thanks for sharing

PS I would love to give your puppy a huge kiss on that beautiful face...I am not great at names ...my pitbull is "JuJuBe" it just came out of my mouth her ears perked up and it was a done deal

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Keeping this on the food theme, our Beagle is named Crisco 'cause he's a tub of lard or a lard a** if you choose.

My grandson has a Basset named Duke. I can't imagine yelling "Dukey" to call him in.

The Cake Bible really is the best cake book that I've ever used.

Enjoying this blog a lot. No questions yet.

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Freezing the layers should work beautifully, to get a head start on things. They can even be frosted frozen, providing they're leveled before and if your frosting will allow---some will develop a little dew-bead when they're chilled.

Major covets on the pot-rack---is it over a stone floor or other surface so that you rinse, hang, and let drip/air dry?

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Oooh, birthday cake! That and 'the old husband' part are where I can relate. What a great new shiny pretty kitchen you have. And Many Happy Abundant Birthday Celebration-al Wishes to you all.

Yes I say bake and freeze. I double triple wrap in plastic because I am a freak for containing all the aroma in there and keeping all other aromas out. Plus it reduces my ice crystals on the surface of the cake.

What will you fill it with??? Seems blueberry might work better than raspberry but...maybe a mocha flavor? Or peanut butter mousse? I like to fill before freezing so all the flavors can get all comfy and personal in the dark. Then ice before serving.

Thoughts for cake? Always! He probably maybe would not want it spiced up a bit, but here's another chocolate idea that even milder paletted folks enjoy. Just a chocolate thought for you. I would guess that the RLB Devil's Food recipe is a nostalgic favorite though.

If he was my customer I'd fill the devil's food cake with Hershey's chocolate icing recipe from the can or maybe some whipped cream, maybe both.

What kind of white icing are you using?

A possibility for the list of names: Fough Dough? Plus I also vote for Clousseau, KweenAhmeen* picked a good one there.

*I'm going phonetic. :biggrin:

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Keeping this on the food theme, our Beagle is named Crisco 'cause he's a tub of lard or a lard a** if you choose.

My grandson has a Basset named Duke. I can't imagine yelling "Dukey" to call him in.

The Cake Bible really is the best cake book that I've ever used.

Enjoying this blog a lot. No questions yet.

Crisco -- too funny! My husband is a Blue Devil! I wonder when he's going to suggest we name the puppy Duke, or Coach K.

I really like the Cake Bible, too. Not a stinker recipe in the whole thing, that I've seen.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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About the cake: I'm making him a sheet cake, no filling (he specifically requested Devil's Food with white frosting). I make the standard Wilton buttercream for decorating, and will probably make a few white-chocolate-tinted-blue decorations for the top.

I think I'll make the cake tonight or tomorrow and freeze it; I like the crumb on this one best when it's been frozen.

I love to make cakes. I wanted to be a pastry chef at one point. Maybe for my next "next career" ...

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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I have been home since 11 a.m. waiting for a delivery that I had to sign for (a puffer fish, some damsel fish and chromas), and it's not here yet.

to entertain myself, I timed the griddle on the BlueStar: Five minutes to get water drops to dance on the center of the griddle, and ten more to get the perimeter to hold heat. I really do need to get a surface thermometer -- the heat is still uneven. Anyway, here's my lunch: honey-wheat bread, an okay tomato, and some monterey jack cheese. Grilled.

gallery_28660_5638_11783.jpg

It was okay. Dinner tonight is going to have all three of us in one place by 7:00ish; at my son's request, we're having enchiladas. It's a great recipe for cold nights like tonight (and rainy, ugh), and the leftovers freeze beautifully, so I make as much as I can at once. Since the kid really hates onion pieces, I poach the chicken in stock with onions, bay leaf and pepper and go easier on the onion in the recipe.

gallery_28660_5638_31781.jpg

they cool in their poaching liquid, and I shred it when I can handle it easily. And yes, these are the dreaded BSCB! Just didn't have time or freezer space this week to break down all the chickens we'll need for the party, and to store the carcasses for stock. Next week, though.

Last, I found some cookie dough leftover in the freezer, from a bake sale a few weeks ago, and baked a dozen

gallery_28660_5638_7879.jpg

The are a deep brown but still have some chew in them. Good stuff.

I'll show the enchiladas when I make them.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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So jealous of your new kitchen!!!

When I was a kid we had a basset hound named Stargell's Homerun.

Homerun for short.

Yes my dad is still a maniac Pittsburgh Pirate's fan.

He got excited when he found out I was living near Roberto Clemente High here in Chicago.

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:laugh: Snakey Boy is the name for our pull-down faucet (racheld, the pots drip onto a stainless steel surface, but not much). When I was desining my kitchen in Atlanta, I really wanted a pull-down faucet, and when we were looking at them, my sons named them Snakey-Boy. The name stuck, and even the architects refer to the pull-down faucet as 'Snakey Boy."

You may wonder how we arrived at the name. My younger son (who is 17, a Junior in high school, and the only one left at home) has always drawn, a lot. His comic strips include "Nun Racers," "Woodchucks with Nunchucks," and "Cranky Mom." Once he started becoming more aware of what I did besides relocate the family and try not to get lost in a new town, he created Snakey Boy.

Snakey Boy is a pit viper. He wears a toque and an apron, and only bites when he is provoked and no other methods of resolution work. Snakey-Boy works at a snack bar. I think he owns the place. He feeds the homeless for free, he discounts his prices for poor people, and only uses the finest ingredients for his offerings. After every episode of Snakey Boy, he gives the big thumbs-up to the readers.

All Hail Snakey-Boy! He often hung out with Cool Flame, a sunglass-wearing bit of fire who regularly drank gasoline and burped his opponents with a firey blast.

I'm very sure I'll be blamed for this one day. :wacko:

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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:laugh: Snakey Boy is the name for our pull-down faucet (racheld, the pots drip onto a stainless steel surface, but not much).  When I was desining my kitchen in Atlanta, I really wanted a pull-down faucet, and when we were looking at them, my sons named them Snakey-Boy. The name stuck, and even the architects refer to the pull-down faucet as 'Snakey Boy."

You may wonder how we arrived at the name.  My younger son (who is 17, a Junior in high school, and the only one left at home) has always drawn, a lot.  His comic strips include "Nun Racers," "Woodchucks with Nunchucks," and "Cranky Mom."  Once he started becoming more aware of what I did besides relocate the family and try not to get lost in a new town, he created Snakey Boy.

Snakey Boy is a pit viper.  He wears a toque and an apron, and only bites when he is provoked and no other methods of resolution work. Snakey-Boy works at a snack bar.  I think he owns the place.  He feeds the homeless for free, he discounts his prices for poor people, and only uses the finest ingredients for his offerings.  After every episode of Snakey Boy, he gives the big thumbs-up to the readers. 

All Hail Snakey-Boy!  He often hung out with Cool Flame, a sunglass-wearing bit of fire who regularly drank gasoline and burped his opponents with a firey blast.

I'm very sure I'll be blamed for this one day. :wacko:

:laugh: Nun Racers! Woodchucks with Nunchucks! I'm totally feeling your son's underground comix vibe, man! And maybe Snakey Boy will eventually go down in history with Too Much Coffee Man in the Hall of Fame of Comic Strips With Food-Related Content. :laugh:

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I have been home since 11 a.m. waiting for a delivery that I had to sign for (a puffer fish, some damsel fish and chromas), and it's not here yet.

And I'm reading this thinking to myself "She's going to cook these? What kind of weirdo stuff has that woman gotten up to now?"

Can you pee in the ocean?

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A possibility for the list of names: Fough Dough? Plus I also vote for Clousseau, KweenAhmeen*  picked a good one there.

*I'm going phonetic.  :biggrin:

...and MY phonetic brain took a very long time to work out where you'd come from with that. I was thinking, "Queen O'Mean? Who goes by that handle around here?"

Perhaps Queen O'Mean could put in an appearance with Snaky Boy and Cool Flame. I dig that comix vibe, too!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Snakey Boy is a pit viper.  He wears a toque and an apron, and only bites when he is provoked and no other methods of resolution work. Snakey-Boy works at a snack bar.  I think he owns the place.  He feeds the homeless for free, he discounts his prices for poor people, and only uses the finest ingredients for his offerings.  After every episode of Snakey Boy, he gives the big thumbs-up to the readers. 

All Hail Snakey-Boy!  He often hung out with Cool Flame, a sunglass-wearing bit of fire who regularly drank gasoline and burped his opponents with a firey blast.

I'm very sure I'll be blamed for this one day. :wacko:

This is the coolest thing in a long time!!! We'd all like a Snakey Boy working for/with us in our imaginary/dream restaurants---he could cook, give us a great reputation for the quality of our food and our charitable endeavours, and just be a BIG draw to the COOL crowd.

Plus, someone who can eject rude, loud, drunken customers with a hypnotic look or a hiss would be greatly in demand in ANY business.

Is there any chance of a look at this paragon of charitable niceness, cuisinary talent and charm? And Cool Flame as well---he's a fantastic pal to have.

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A possibility for the list of names: Fough Dough? Plus I also vote for Clousseau, KweenAhmeen*  picked a good one there.

*I'm going phonetic.  :biggrin:

...and MY phonetic brain took a very long time to work out where you'd come from with that. I was thinking, "Queen O'Mean? Who goes by that handle around here?"

Perhaps Queen O'Mean could put in an appearance with Snaky Boy and Cool Flame. I dig that comix vibe, too!

ROTFLMAO!!! :laugh::laugh::laugh:

And here I thought I'd have to wait til the munchkin came up with that name on her own.....

Hmmm.... decorate the cake with chromis-lookalikes and see if you can get a rise out of your comic genius son? Or the Man himself?

Enchiladas are on the books for mañana. How do you make yours?

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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So jealous of your new kitchen!!!

When I was a kid we had a basset hound named Stargell's Homerun.

Homerun for short.

Yes my dad is still a maniac Pittsburgh Pirate's fan.

He got excited when he found out I was living near Roberto Clemente High here in Chicago.

I have a long baseball history; wont' go into it here. But ... I remember when Clemente's plane went down (a dark day). I was there when Pete Rose hit his 4000th, and Johnny Bench's last game was my wedding day.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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And I'm reading this thinking to myself "She's going to cook these? What kind of weirdo stuff has that woman gotten up to now?"

:laugh: what do you mean, "now"? You know I'm a pretty vanilla type. Kind of, well, like you. :wink:

BTW, the puffer fish is lovely. The others arrive tomorrow.

[edited because therese is many things, but vanilla sure ain't one of them!]

Edited by FabulousFoodBabe (log)
"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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Awesome. I can hardly wait for the rest of this blog. Love the new kitchen! Congrats on the end of construction. That's always a nightmare. May you cook in it in good health for many years to come ...

Happy Birthday to Mr. Fabby! Party preparations should be interesting. I look forward to seeing the festivities take shape.

Any chance you could scan up some of your son's comics? I think we need to actually view Snakey Boy, now.

As for the utterly adorable pup - he needs a name that suits him. But pets should also have names that convey some sense of majesty and importance. Because we all know that's how they humbly see themselves. :rolleyes:

My dearly departed dachshund was named Elvis. His proper given registered name was Elvis Nothin'-but-a-Hund-Dog. :biggrin: I vote for Wallingford. Wally for short. It just seems to have enough pompousness to match his rumply little face. Guillaume aka Willy could work well also. The family that lived across the street from me growing up had a basset named Willy that was best buddies with my poodle.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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      Greece had managed to return to a state of near normality, and opted to allow vaccinated individuals to enter. And so I decided to go on a slightly spontaneous vacation (only slightly, we still had almost a month for planning). To the trip I was joined by my father, to whom I owed some good one-on-one time and was able to travel on a short-ish notice.
       
       
      Many people are yet unable to travel, and many countries are suffering quite badly from the virus, and therefore I considered if I should wait some time with this post. However, I hope that it will instead be seen with an optimistic view, showing that back-to-normal is growing ever closer.
       
       
      We returned just a few days ago, and it will take me some time to organize my photos, so this is a teaser until then.
       
       
       
       
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