Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: FabulousFoodBabe - Brand New Kitchen, Same Old Husband


Recommended Posts

I actually wanted to name our first male Elvis, but was vetoed by my husband, hence the Mickey name. And Baxter just didn't look like an Elvis.....so maybe we need to get another one, too. 
Bassets are like potato chips, don't you think?. :wink:
Where in California? Your husband musta been born on the coast somewhere, in light of his dad's being in the Navy at the time. Where? And where in Central California did you live
San Diego is his birthplace. We lived in Modesto -- when Mr. FB worked for the Gallo Winery. Good people, good place.
As a resident of Grand Rapids, MI, home of Wolverine World Wide (well, almost -- they're in Rockford, a suburb), maker of Hush Puppies, I offer a piece of trivia. The basset hound who appeared in all those famous Hush Puppies ads in the late 80s was named Jason, full name Jasonian of Westchester (!).

Is that Kismet or Karma or Fate? LOL -- (I still have purple suede Hush Puppies from when they were cool.)

Request: you have many animals? Do you buy pet food for all of them, or do you make any? If you make pet food, could that find space in yr blog?
Let's see: Johnny (kitty -- hey, two syllables is right! :biggrin: ) is battling Feline Obesity, so he's on diet cat food. Jean-Luc has a very sensitive stomach; we learned the hard way to keep him on the Eukanuba :blink: The skink, land crab, and fish are all on live food. I do need to make some dog biscuits this week for Jean-Luc's best friends in the neighborhood (two whippets and a greyhound, all in one family). If I find the time, I'll show that.

Marya, therese -- yeah, French! Gerard is very good. And thank you, therese, for not doing as I asked you a year or so ago: to smack me upside the head if I ever talk about getting a new puppy again. :wub:

racheld -- what the heck are you talking about? :cool:

Back to human food.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today, we all slept late (5:30). The backup alarm clock didn't go off -- apparently, by taking it to the golf course yesterday and letting it chase geese off lead for a couple of hours, it was too exhausted to do the usual 4:30 a.m. wake-up. :smile:

Since breakfast has always been the meal we have together, I like to do requests for the boys. My son wanted pancakes and bacon, with a hot chocolate (no espresso shot). We didn't have much time so I wasn't able to get a good photo of that. He can't have a car at school yet, so he drives in the morning; I ride along and really cherish that 20 minutes of alone-time where we either listen to his music, or he tells me his latest thoughts on politics, Scientology, and marine life.

When I got back to the house and the first cappuccino of the day, in my very cool Miele Coffee Center. It has a little panel that tells you what to do

gallery_28660_5638_108.jpg

First, the milk froth

gallery_28660_5638_25914.jpg

And then you're prompted to move your cup under the espresso dispenser

gallery_28660_5638_4796.jpg

With a slice of honey-wheat bread that I made yesterday, and some strawberry preserves, we have breakfast.

gallery_28660_5638_11124.jpg

For the first time in a long time, no workmen are scheduled! Immediately after the renovation completed and the punchlist was done, we had the housepainters do the rest of the interior. (I guess this is what you do when you live in the same place for more than 24 months? :raz: ) They're finally done, and we finally have our garage back.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're serious about asking, Riker is Jean Luc's second-in-command.

Of course, there's always Data, but unless your pup has yellow eyes, that won't fly.

And Geordi, of course, of the COOL eye-gear.

Oh! Like Jean-Luc Picard! Gotcha. Wow. This is making sense out of a lot of things people have said to us over the years we've had J-L. :laugh: Gawd, I'm a dork.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheers to you & Mr. Foodbabe!

I as well turn 50 but two weeks from Thursday.

Apparently, I have been denied favorites like oysters and foie gras, to be replaced with All Bran and cheeseburger helper... maybe we should switch places?? :rolleyes:

Nice Sea urchin you got there. I suppose I could eat that...

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just remembered that when I was a little girl, a favorite book was Bascombe the Flying Dog. Bascombe was a bassett hound who discovered that he could spread those enormous ears and soar with them. So you see, I do know a 2-syllable word that would be (more) appropriate (than "kitty") for a bassett's name. It isn't a very French-sounding name - I'd make it more English - but it will get a smile of recognition from a few who remember the book.

Visalia girl here, myself. There's at least one other Modestan in the audience, if he's tuned in yet.

It's nice to hear that you get good alone-time / talking-time with your son. I cherish the memories of my talks with Mom, to and from town, at about that age. It's a shame when kids don't have that with their parents. Good for you both, that you have it.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Visalia girl here, myself.  There's at least one other Modestan in the audience, if he's tuned in yet.

It's nice to hear that you get good alone-time / talking-time with your son.  I cherish the memories of my talks with Mom, to and from town, at about that age.  It's a shame when kids don't have that with their parents.  Good for you both, that you have it.

I hope the person tunes in; I think I'm not supposed to say the name on the board. Visalia girl -- you still there?

Thanks for all the good wishes for Mr. FB -- he's the true babe in the family. Anyone else read that endpiece in Time Magazine a few months ago, where it discussed marrying out of your "hotness" class? that's us! :biggrin:

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Saga of the Pate Dough.

When I was a culinary student, it became my responsibility to make Pate dough for the Pate en croute. I felt pretty cool about it; I'd been cooking for a long time and it didn't seem too hard.

Chef Turgeon walked by my first (yes, first!) attempt and said, "something's not right with that." I said I had measured carefully. I said I had measured twice, dumped once. And that I couldn't think of what it could be. Of course he was right, so I did it over again. This time, I was even more careful, it got to the rolling stage when he said, "what did you do with this?" The dough was a mess. It seized. It behaved like something that had been overworked. It was cracking in some spots. It had to be patched into the mold and that pissed me off more than anything in the world. There was no time to redo it and Chef told me to relax. I couldn't. I hated that damned dough. I still do. To this day, I can't figure out what I did wrong.

My cooking team labeled it in the refrigerator, "Ducking Fough." It was soon shortened to "Fough." "Yo, Fabby -- got any of that fough left?" LOL (not).

So when I decided to make tartlet shells for the party this week, I thought it was time to revisit the Fough.

20 oz. bread flour

1 1/2 oz powdered milk

1/4 oz baking soda

1/2 oz salt

3 1/2 oz shortening

2 1/2 oz butter

2 eggs

1 T cider vinegar

8 oz milk (more or less)

gallery_28660_5638_5692.jpg

Mix the dry ingredients; cut fat into them (I used a paddle attachment on my KitchenAid). Add the vinegar and eggs, process a little longer. Switch to a dough hook, and add about 4 oz of the milk -- the rest if necessary. Finish on the bench, square, wrap tightly and let it rest for a half-hour.

gallery_28660_5638_5498.jpg

not bad, eh?

(No photos except for the end product -- I lost my camera for a while. Heh.)

It's easiest to roll this dough out on a pasta machine if you haven't just done a renovation and are still trying to find things. Luckily, I have a rolling pin or two:

gallery_28660_5638_7966.jpg

Roll the fough very thin and cut it into rounds. The rounds go into mini muffin pans if you don't have a zillion tartlet pans; tamp the bottoms with the end of a wooden spoon and bake at 350 for about 5-7 minutes, until they brown.

gallery_28660_5638_12488.jpg

The finished product:

gallery_28660_5638_2223.jpg

Take that, fough!

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love all the Basset talk! And I'm about to take mine out for our afternoon walk, but wanted to share a few other things.

First, when I did the design, I told the architect that I do not do cannisters on the counter and here's what they came up with:

gallery_28660_5638_11984.jpg

Two drawers, three 3-pans and three 6-pans in each, with covers. The 3pans hold about 7 or 8# of flour each. The 3-pans hold sugar, semolina, cornmeal, etc. I love it.

And I'm having an amazing time with the BlueStar. Lookie mcLook:

gallery_28660_5638_18597.jpg

I'm having a weeeee bit of trouble with the griddle on the thing. Did the burn-in twice and it just takes for-freaking-ever to heat well and evenly. I've been using my All-Clad griddle for pancake mornings. Any advice on using the griddle is welcome!

Time to walk the doggie. I'll take the camera in case he eats anything interesting.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe it's just griddles are like that? I'm having similar problems with my new griddle--yesterday it took 12 minutes to heat up (yes, I timed it) even though the instructions say it can take "up to 45 seconds." 45 seconds, my aunt fanny...

Can't wait to read more of the blog, especially to see the new digs in action.

Feast then thy heart, for what the heart has had, the hand of no heir shall ever hold.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Catching up ... ready for the fabulousness to begin. :smile:

Having just turned 51 this past December, I've been trying to decide whether I agree with the "50 is the new 40" bit ... or the more timeless sentiment that "hey, this is what 50 looks like." :laugh:

Any chance you might sneak across the Tappan Zee to my old hometown of Nyack? :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is cool.

In re new arrival: They sure are nice and squishy when they're little, aren't they? Riffing logically on Rachel's idea, William comes to mind. But first I thought French, hypenated, to coordinate with J-L.

I know how you feel: Ivan passed that b.d. milestone in 2007, and was actually carded buying beer in the last year.

And I treasure the driving talking with my 16-year-old, too.

Blog on!

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Fabby,

Can't wait to see what turns up in this blog. Happy 50th to Mr. FB. I roomed with a Modestan when I lived in SF (she grew up with the Gallo family).

I love the "ducking fough"!!! :laugh: , I've had my share of experiences like that!

Please, continue cooking...I'm anticipating all the food for the party!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm having a weeeee bit of trouble with the griddle on the thing.  Did the burn-in twice and it just takes for-freaking-ever to heat well and evenly.  I've been using my All-Clad griddle for pancake mornings.  Any advice on using the griddle is welcome.

It takes a good 12-15 minutes to preheat mine, if I follow the instructions to start off at a low setting. I have to admit that it's a pain to get up to temp, and it does have hot spots. I tend to use it as a flat top to keep sauces warm and prepared dishes at temp. The grill is a different story. It's used often and does a great job with anything I throw on it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm following along with Blue Star envy. I chose the cooktop and wall oven route 10 years ago and am hesitant to give up the storeage under the cooktop. But I surely love the range idea! It is just beautiful. Functionality is important, however! :biggrin:

I had a friend with a basset named Sherman. I suppose Monsieur Sherman would be more apropopriate in your case!

Thanks for blogging!!

Marsha

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, now the fough looks easy, thanks to your instructions and photos! I suppposed that's one of its pitfalls, though.

I *had not* thought of storage bins in the drawers. That could be sooooo much nicer than canisters inside the cupboards which is my current setup. We're considering redoing our kitchen, and we're on the lookout for what works and what doesn't. How easy is it to remove those drawer pans and get them back in again? With regard to your kitchen reno: I'm all ears (well, eyes) as the week goes on, if you care to comment on what has worked fabulously, what has worked not as well as you'd expected, and what you think you'd do differently if you had to do it again.

Feh. Y'all are just kids, going on about turning 50. :raz: And somehow, I'm betting the "hotness" class is about even.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How nice to see all that fabulousness and gorgeousness in action! Oh, and the kitchen too! :wink:

How about Clouseau for the new guy?

(He does look a lot like a Barnard tho, with those delightful spots/freckles.)

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My neighbor had a sweet basset named Nigel. It just fit.

Looking forward to the rest of the blog. Oh, and the hotel pans for flours - consider that idea stolen!

Dang, I was going to suggest Nigel, too!

When we got our Basset (awful lot of Basset owners on this board), I wanted Nigel, or Fred (the Basset from "Smokey and the Bandit"), but they were vetoed, so we settled on Duke. Kind of fun to stand at the back door and yell "SADIE...DUUUUUKE!"

Looking forward to the 50th birthday coverage. I'm hoping when I hit that milestone I'm out of the country on an uncharted dessert island. (No, that wasn't a misspelling, I want an island full of desserts.)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“A favorite dish in Kansas is creamed corn on a stick.”

-Jeff Harms, actor, comedian.

>Enjoying every bite, because I don't know any better...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Augh! I keep getting a database error when I try to upload photos from dinner. Believe me, though, you're not missing much. Mondays are wild around here: Kid has after-school stuff and didn't get in until nearly 6. He asked for pizza tonight (mine, not delivery! Aww ...) so I whipped one up for him. I had some dough in the freezer (Note: Pizza dough is DOUGH. Other dough is FOUGH.) The Miele speed oven we have has a great defrosting function that made quick work of that. I also keep some sauce around for just this reason.

Marinated a couple of chicken breasts in lemon juice, smooshed garlic and s/p and grilled em. Had mine as it is; Mr. FB will probably put his on a sandwich with cheese, mayo, and have a beer with it, and lose weight. Sigh.

Can't wait to see what turns up in this blog. Happy 50th to Mr. FB. I roomed with a Modestan when I lived in SF (she grew up with the Gallo family).
They were all over the place when I lived in California! Shoot, I was at a butts 'n' guts class and the person sweating next to me was one of the wives (not telling which one :wink: -- but she was terrific, always). After spending ten years in the P&G corporate structure, the thought of one of those types donning a leotard and sweating with the masses just did not compute. Yep, California was laid back and I loved it!
Looking forward to the rest of the blog. Oh, and the hotel pans for flours - consider that idea stolen!

Glad to be of service! :smile:

How easy is it to remove those drawer pans and get them back in again? With regard to your kitchen reno: I'm all ears (well, eyes) as the week goes on, if you care to comment on what has worked fabulously, what has worked not as well as you'd expected, and what you think you'd do differently if you had to do it again.
The pans in the back of the drawer aren't easy to put in or pull out as the setup is now; I had to change them to 3" depth (the others are 6"). The cabinetmaker made a frame that holds all the pans in place at the same height. When I remove the front pans, the rack pulls out and the rear ones can come out if I need to clean or remove them. I had an extremely detail-oriented designer working on this project. Wait till you see my recipe racks!

As I go through the week, I'll give some detail on all the different things we have. I'd say for each thing I had to give up (a lowboy, a trough sink), I got something amazing in return (a speed rack space, a huge kitchen island).

I'm following along with Blue Star envy. I chose the cooktop and wall oven route 10 years ago and am hesitant to give up the storeage under the cooktop. But I surely love the range idea! It is just beautiful. Functionality is important, however
Oooh -- wait till you see my pot storage! :biggrin:

And MizDucky ... you will love the theme of the party. It's this:

Fifty is the new Thirty. (That's my story, and I'm sticking to it!) (do note the Duke Blue color for the lettering!)

We're putting all your basset name ideas on a list with ours, and marking off the ones we can't do for one reason or another (like baby names!). Example: Carlos is great, but it's a friend's husband. So is Bernard, and Nigel. We all love Brian but (a) it's one of my husband's partners, and (b) we don't want to copy too much off Family Guy. :biggrin:

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're looking at a kitchen renovation this summer. I can't wait to see the rest of the details in your kitchen. I have very limited space, so I can use all the innovative storage ideas I can get.

We also have a new addition as of Friday. This is Quincy. We chose his name to fit with our other dogs, Milo and Kirby. The name also had to pass the yelling test, according to my husband.

gallery_8693_309_327080.jpghttp://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1201491277/gallery_8693_309_327080.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      The first week of November are „autumn holidays“ in the area where I live. We wanted to use that time to go to Paris, but when my parents-in-law somewhat surprisingly announced they‘d be coming over from Spain for the whole of November, we scrapped that idea and looked for something more German …
       
      So … Berlin. Not the best time to travel (cold & rainy), but with a couple of museums for the little one and the slightly older ones to enjoy together, plus some food options I was looking forward it was a destination we could all agree on. The Covid19 warnings in the Berlin subway support that notion …
       

       
    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...