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End-Grain Boos Board splitting?


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The only thing I can think of is a major change of humidity could cause a shrink/swell cycle in the wood. Tangential, radial and to some extent longitudinal shrinkage could cause problems. If there was any glue starved areas in the board they would most likely be the first joints to go bad.

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Hi,

You might try soaking the board in mineral oil.

or, you might want to call Boos. They seem to have developed a better attitude about customer service in the past five years. The new generation of management is enlightened.

Tim

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Splits have developed in my end cut Boos board over the past couple of months. A couple started at the ends of the board, but now one has started on the interior. Anyone else had this problem?

This has happened to me as well...TWICE. I've had two of the round end-cut Boos blocks and they have both ended up splitting. My current one is also warped, in spite of the fact that I am careful to never soak it in water, or even use much water to clean it. The first one I took back to Sur La Table without a problem which is what I'll end up doing with this one. I have another rectangular end-cut Boos that has had no problems at all.

Keep us up to date if you find out anything.

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Sorry if this is a stupid question but what do you mean by end cut? You mean end-grain board like a butcher block? I've never heard the term "end cut" used.

I have a Boo's edge-grain board that started to split on me at one of the ends. I just bought a pipe clamp from Home Depot for about $20 and some Gorilla Glue and fixed it right up. Hasn't had a problem since.

Edited by Octaveman (log)

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Yes, I meant end-grain. Thanks for pointing that out, Octaveman.

This one is rectangular.

The humidity level has been lower for a few weeks, so that may be a part of it. I use mineral oil (actually the Boos Oil version) regularly and used it a week ago to try to stem the splitting, but it appears to continue.

Good to hear that Boos does well with customer support these days, but I think this one goes back to Sur La Table next time I am in the store.

Thanks everyone.

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Wood splits because the grain isn't consistent, especially end-grain boards which can come from any portion of the cross-cut of the tree. Picture looking straight down on a tree stump, and cutting squares out of that. You can see how the grain will be different in each piece, varying from inner rings to near the bark.

If the manufacturer is not careful in setting up the grain patterns, the wood's natural expansion and contraction can be stronger than the glue. Wood moves. Quality doors and cabinets take that expansion in mind when engineering and building.

I'd use Titebond II instead of Gorilla glue, though. The Titebond is safe for food contact surfaces. Gorilla Glue is overkill for that kind of use. Anything smaller than an entertainment center is too small, especially if the wood is already moving. If there is any kind of gap after clamping, the polyurethane joint is weakened considerably. It's fine for a tight fitting machined joint, not so much if you have to push the wood together. Whereas the Titebond is flexible and can move with the wood, instead of failing.

edited to fix a fact.

Edited by FistFullaRoux (log)
Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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I have a Boos end grain countertop that developed a crack. Boos supplied a replacement that sits in my garage waiting for installation. This one sits over a dishwasher which may have something to with the crack as the other countertops have no problems at all.-Dick

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Sur La Table kindly exchanged my cracked board for a new one today. Hope this one has no problems. With the use I give it, the board should last 10 - 15 years.

As I was unwrapping the shrink wrap, I read the care directions. Said "Not Dishwasher Compatible". Maybe that was the problem...just kidding!

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I highly recommend getting a board conditioner.  The one below is what I use and it works wonders.

http://japaneseknifesharpening.com/boardwax.html

Interesting. I saw the same or a similar product for the first time at Sur La Table yesterday when I exchanged the board. What does the beeswax do that mineral oil alone does not?

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I highly recommend getting a board conditioner.  The one below is what I use and it works wonders.

http://japaneseknifesharpening.com/boardwax.html

Interesting. I saw the same or a similar product for the first time at Sur La Table yesterday when I exchanged the board. What does the beeswax do that mineral oil alone does not?

Yeah, what Jim said. I've found that it works much much better on end-grain boards than it does on edge-grain. I've used the Boos oil before on my edge-grain board and for the most part it sits on top with very little absorption. But using a conditioiner on my end-grain was like feeding a starving animal. It just sucked it up. One should apply this on both sides of the board too; not just the cutting surface.

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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