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lisa_antonia

Swedish/Scandinavian Baking Books.

8 posts in this topic

I like the recipes i've made from The Swedish Table by Helene Henderson, but I'm not sure which other books to try.

Most of the cookbooks at my library have sparse instructions and no photos. Can anyone recommend some Swedish/Scandinavian cookbooks that they've actually cooked from? I'm mostly looking for pastries/breads/sweet things.

I'd be interested in good Hungarian baking books too.

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I'm guessing you want them in english, not swedish...? :smile:

I would have plenty of suggestions in swedish...

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Beatrice Ojakangas has many books that fit your desires, particularly for baking. The titles I own are not generous with photos, but the detailed directions and anecdotes make them a pleasure to use.

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Kaffehaus by Rick Rodgers has a number of Hungarian recipes, but it is not a Hungarian baking book per se.

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I like the recipes i've made from The Swedish Table by Helene Henderson, but I'm not sure which other books to try.

Most of the cookbooks at my library have sparse instructions and no photos. Can anyone recommend some Swedish/Scandinavian cookbooks that they've actually cooked from? I'm mostly looking for pastries/breads/sweet things.

I'd be interested in good Hungarian baking books too.

You can find George Lang's book with no trouble. I have a number of scandavian baking books in english that I've found at used book stores. They were published in the 60's, riding on the "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" wave. Some are very good and authentic and a bit old fashioned, which I like.

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Another Beatrice Ojakangas fan. She is of Finnish decent and grew up baking and making Scandinavian specialties. The Great Scandinavian Baking Book is a favorite.

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1968, Filene's Basement Boston.

Browsing.

Table of all kinds of books. Found:

" The Great Scandinavian Cook Book "

an English Translation from the original ' NYA STORA Kokboken ', Karin Fredrikson Gothenburg 1963

This thome weighs eight pounds, nicely illustrated. I love it.

Especially the price at the time $ 1.75, sticker is still on it


Edited by Peter B Wolf (log)

Peter

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Sju sorters kakor ( seven kinds of cookies ( or cakes ) ) is probably the most typical swedish pastry book you can find, it's been published over 60 years I have the 88th ed.

Most recipies are of the housewife kind, ie not fancy proffesional pastry chef cakes and cookies. I believe the first ed was a collection of the best out of 8000 recipies that people sent in a contest in 1945. Recipies have been changed several times since then from what I understand

All recipies are not neccessarily swedish ( there is a brownie recipie for instance ) but many are typical swedish pastries.

There seem to be an english version coming out in june, at $12 it's probalbly a good buy.

http://www.amazon.com/Swedish-Cakes-Cookie...03782349&sr=1-1

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