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SobaAddict70

Filipino Food Is Fantastic!

309 posts in this topic

That's interesting.  My mom never fried chicken afterwards, although I do half fry and no fry, depending on my mood.  (I'd say I prefer wet adobo to dry, but either is fine.  The recipe below compromises between the two styles.)  --Soba

distilled vinegar

water

garlic (preferably whole or slightly crushed)

bay leaves (2 or 3 is fine)

salt to taste

pepper to taste (whole black peppercorns are even better -- I like a lot of peppercorns)

chicken, cut into serving pieces

mushroom soy

oil

Combine vinegar, water, garlic, bay leaves, salt and pepper or peppercorns in a large pot or dutch oven, and bring to a boil.  Add chicken and cover.  Bring to a 2nd boil.  Reduce heat and cook for 45 minutes to an hour, or until chicken is tender.  (I prefer our chicken literally falling off the bone.)  Sprinkle with soy sauce and cook for another five to ten minutes.  Remove chicken, and reduce till slightly thickened.  Meanwhile, fry chicken till browned.  Return fried chicken to pot, toss to coat with sauce.

Serve IMMEDIATELY with steamed rice.

Hi Soba!

I know I'm replying to an older post, but I am curious...

Have you or your family ever made Adobo Sa Gata (w/ Coconut Milk)?

My grandmother was Visayan, and taught me how to cook this.

Basically, it has all the same ingredients that you list, but no soy sauce. The coconut milk is combined with all the other ingredients and it cooks down to a terribly tasty sauce.


raquel

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe -Roy Batty

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Not to my recollection. My mom never made it that way.

I have to run this by her now.

Coconut milk didn't feature prominently in my family's cooking. My grandmother did most of the cooking when I was living in the Philippines (with assistance from maids, of course). My mom learned her stuff through grandma, which is how I remember. I didn't "discover" the ingredient until I was in the United States, and then not until I was a teenager.

Soba

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I know I'm replying to an older post, but I am curious...

Have you or your family ever made Adobo Sa Gata (w/ Coconut Milk)?

My grandmother was Visayan, and taught me how to cook this.

Basically, it has all the same ingredients that you list, but no  soy sauce.  The coconut milk is combined with all the other ingredients and it cooks down to a terribly tasty sauce.

I'm not Soba, but my mother (Visayan, from Talisay) said she had never heard of Adobo sa Gata until she moved to Winnipeg (where most of the Flips are Tagalogs). Where in the Visayas was your grandmother from? It's a pretty big area, so I'm wondering if there are regional variations even within the region.

To me, it sounds more Bicol--I always associate the use of coconut milk in Filipino food with Bicol.

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I'm not Soba, but my mother (Visayan, from Talisay) said she had never heard of Adobo sa Gata until she moved to Winnipeg (where most of the Flips are Tagalogs).  Where in the Visayas was your grandmother from?  It's a pretty big area, so I'm wondering if there are regional variations even within the region. 

To me, it sounds more Bicol--I always associate the use of coconut milk in Filipino food with Bicol.

Hi Prasantrin,

My mother's family is from Bacolod... Negros Occidental. Is that near Talisay?

I don't have a vivid memory of the region. The last time I was there to visit was in 1976! All I remember are the little Changi (sp?) stores on every block and the little Filipino chocolate candies that they sold. I also have fond memories of women walking down the street every morning with baskets on their heads calling out, "Isda! Isda!"

I have not been aware of any other use of coconut milk in a Filipino savory dish except for this Adobo sa Gata. Every other coconut related dish that I know of is a dessert (i.e. Halo Halo, Bibinka, Macapuno Cakes, etc.). I'll ask my mom about the possible Bicol origination though, and come back to the thread...

Where is Bicol? I wish I knew more of the layout of the Philippines!


raquel

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe -Roy Batty

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Hi Prasantrin,

My mother's family is from Bacolod... Negros Occidental.  Is that near Talisay?

I don't have a vivid memory of the region.  The last time I was there to visit was in 1976!  All I remember are the little Changi (sp?) stores on every block and the little Filipino chocolate candies that they sold.  I also have fond memories of women walking down the street every morning with baskets on their heads calling out, "Isda!  Isda!"

I have not been aware of any other use of coconut milk in a Filipino savory dish except for this Adobo sa Gata.  Every other coconut related dish that I know of is a dessert (i.e.  Halo Halo, Bibinka, Macapuno Cakes, etc.).  I'll ask my mom about the possible Bicol origination though, and come back to the thread...

Where is Bicol?  I wish I knew more of the layout of the Philippines!

I think it's the southern part of Luzon. The food of Bicol is much more South-east Asian-ish than the rest of Filipino food--they use more coconut milk and the food tends to be spicier. An example of a dish from Bicol is here .

Talisay is just outside Bacolod. That's where Katabla is (the family sugar cane farm). Actually, I lived in Bacolod for a year when I was 10--way back in '79. I was at St. Scholastica's. I remember those women, too (though probably not the same ones!)! We bought a lot of fish from them! I also remember buying Chippy's and Eucalyptus candies from those stores. Your mother's family aren't, by chance, related to the Kilayko family, are they?

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Here's the best place to be introduce to this cuisine:

Cendrillon, located at 45 Mercer St. SoHo. Its north of Pearle Paint and South of Gourmet Garage. Hopefully these landmarks help you find it.

Website:

http://www.cendrillon.com/

If you want Filipino food, you must go and have Chef Doroatan’s brunch menu, I believe it is served Sat and Sun 11am-4pm. The flavor profile is still true to the cuisine but he interprets Filipino food yet maintains its integrity. What makes him unique: he dares to do a la carte and a la minute cooking with a tradition that is served family style. He uses French technique to raise Filipino Cuisine—he makes Filipino food accessible to a palate that has not acquired the Filipino flavors. He appeared on Cooking in Martha’s Kitchen and prepared his Fresh Lumpia. I would start this as your appetizer and have it split for two. Then I would move on to the Tocino (achuete-cured pork) & Eggs with Garlic-fried Rice and an order of Pancit Luglug, Thick Rice Noodles with Shrimp, Smoked Trout, Pork & Tofu. His pancit luglug is what keeps me coming back. I love this dish. These are my food memories of it. His version is the most soigné version of any Filipino noodle dish that I have had in my life (btw, I’m Filipino). It’s made with a thick rice noodle, like the thickness of a bucatini, minus the hole in the center. Its dressed in a shrimp based sauce that has been married with ground pork. The garnishes are large jumbo shrimp that have an inherent sweetness, smoked trout that elevate this dish giving it an elegance, and nicely hard boil egg which bring the dish back to its tradition. This dish represents what this man is trying to achieve: celebrating Filipino food and to giving this cuisine respectful visibility. Cleaning up the technique helped the flavors blend together yet maintaining their identity. This is pancit lug lug is a breakthrough for professional Filipino food.

As for dessert, try the suman. His version is very sensual to the palate, the textural sensations in your mouth border on sexual. That’s all I’ll say, you must try it.

I would also get a glass of Kalamansi Juice. It tastes like Gatorade citrus punch, but better. His is refreshing, tangy, sweet. It restores you on a hot humid day.

In terms of queen’s Filipino food: Take the Local 7 train to 69th Fisk Ave and you will find a strip of little manila. Be warned none of this food is visually appetitizing but it tasted good. It looks like rustic home style country food.

Best Adobo: pork, at the phil-am market. Its $3.50 for a pint. Buy 2 or 3 and take it home and eat it with rice.

Best Sinigang Na Baboy (Pork Sinigang): Inhawan. It’s the Monday and Thursday special and it the best flavor, made with pork ribs. Its tender, savory sweet, and luscious texture of braised pork ribs. The acid of the tamarind cut through the pork flavor. Its perfect with a bowl of rice on a cold fall/winter night. Buy 2 orders.

Best Pancit: None really, you must go and have the lug lug at Cendrillion there’s no other comparison. But if you just had to get a crab fix in noodle form and you are stuck in Queens: Have the pancit palabok at Ihawan. And maybe the sontanghon at Crystals. But Cendrillion’s lug lug is the way to go-trust me.

Best Paksiw Na Lechon: Phil-Am food case-3.50 for a pint, you will only want one.

Final thoughts: When it comes to Filipino food the best place to send a stranger would be to have brunch at Cendrillion on Saturday and Sunday. This is the best way to start. As for dining in Queens go with a Filipino friend who is a trained foodie that you trust, it’s the best way to have a positive experience. Or just e-mail me and I’ll take you by the hand and guide you through the Queen's Filipino dining process.

Cendrillon Asian Grill and Merienda Bar

located at 45 Mercer St. between Broome and Grand Streets

New York, NY 10013

Phone: (212)343-9012

Fax: (212)343-9670Ihawan: 40-06 70th Street Woodside, NY 718 205 1480

KRYSTAL'S CAFE "Restaurant and Pastry Shop"

69-02 Roosevelt Avenue NY

Phil-Am Foodmart (70-02 Roosevelt Ave, corner of 70th St)

-B

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growing up in the philippines(manila), one of my favorite drinks was kalamansi juice with fresh kalamansi..Dinuguan, balut, champorado are very good..but the balut that i've seen state-side doesn't even compare to the ones i'm used to seeing and eating in the philippines...halo halo is soo good..i haven't been to cendrillon in nyc yet..that's one place i'd like to try out...jolibee in the philippienes not only meant the usual burgers and fries but also fried chicken and spaghetti. my mom makes beef Sinigang with the bone marrow. very delicious.

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barawidan, I love you. I was just about to post in the NY forum where in Queens one can buy these things. I LOVE ELMHURST!

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I walked past Elvie's Turo-Turo on a somewhat unusual route home from work and picked up a piece of cassava cake that was very good. It contained custard, large coconut shreds, and of course sugar.

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The spicyness/hotness is a factor of region. The southern provinces, such as Bicol, tend to cook spicier food although it's often tempered with coconut milk. There are also many Filipinos who eat most everything with spoonfuls of vinegar flavoured with squashed chili peppers. Also, spicier foods tend to be tapas-style dishes (pulutan) to serve with San Miguel beer. Otherwise, Soba is right that Filipino food isn't for the bold-tongued.

I'm not Soba, but my mother (Visayan, from Talisay) said she had never heard of Adobo sa Gata until she moved to Winnipeg (where most of the Flips are Tagalogs).  Where in the Visayas was your grandmother from?  It's a pretty big area, so I'm wondering if there are regional variations even within the region. 

To me, it sounds more Bicol--I always associate the use of coconut milk in Filipino food with Bicol.

I have not been aware of any other use of coconut milk in a Filipino savory dish except for this Adobo sa Gata. Every other coconut related dish that I know of is a dessert (i.e. Halo Halo, Bibinka, Macapuno Cakes, etc.).

I spent the first five years of my life in Mindanao, Davao City to be exact, and I love spicy food. Cane vinegar infused with garlic and chilis is one of my favourite condiments for chicken or fried fish. I've even managed to convert my caucasian husband to the joys of vinegar as a condiment.

Laing is the first savoury dish with coconut milk that springs to mind. Using coconut milk, pork, taro leaves and shrimp (optional), it can be bumped up to spicy as noted in this recipe. From what I gather, it is a Bicolano recipe.


Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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My evil trick is to seek friends with similiar interests. Over at my Pinoy friend's house, I've had Pancit Bihong, Kari-kari, Lengua, Adobo, some kind of tapioca pudding with brown sugar dessert, Rellenong manok (a Christmas tradition) Lumpia, and a bunch of other stuff. All of it was great except for the stuff that comes out of a jar called Ba'gu'ong? (spelling) If you thought Belachan was smelly, you should try this stuff!

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Hi Prasantrin,

My mother's family is from Bacolod... Negros Occidental.  Is that near Talisay?

I don't have a vivid memory of the region.  The last time I was there to visit was in 1976!  All I remember are the little Changi (sp?) stores on every block and the little Filipino chocolate candies that they sold.  I also have fond memories of women walking down the street every morning with baskets on their heads calling out, "Isda!  Isda!"

I have not been aware of any other use of coconut milk in a Filipino savory dish except for this Adobo sa Gata.  Every other coconut related dish that I know of is a dessert (i.e.  Halo Halo, Bibinka, Macapuno Cakes, etc.).  I'll ask my mom about the possible Bicol origination though, and come back to the thread...

Where is Bicol?  I wish I knew more of the layout of the Philippines!

I think it's the southern part of Luzon. The food of Bicol is much more South-east Asian-ish than the rest of Filipino food--they use more coconut milk and the food tends to be spicier. An example of a dish from Bicol is here .

Talisay is just outside Bacolod. That's where Katabla is (the family sugar cane farm). Actually, I lived in Bacolod for a year when I was 10--way back in '79. I was at St. Scholastica's. I remember those women, too (though probably not the same ones!)! We bought a lot of fish from them! I also remember buying Chippy's and Eucalyptus candies from those stores. Your mother's family aren't, by chance, related to the Kilayko family, are they?

Hi again Prasantrin-

I got a hold of my mom and asked her about the gata savory dishes. She said there was one other coconut dish that my grandmother made called Ginat-an : Jackfruit, coconut milk, beans, pork... This might be another Bicolano dish, but my mom swears that the rest of my Visayan family makes it.

As far as the family names go, she knows a Tutay Kilayko (one of the deans @ ONI... now UNO). Also, my uncle... Rudy Ramirez... knew alot of the Kilayko family.

My mother is good friends with someone from Talisay... Ciocon family.

Do any of the following family names ring any bells? Ramirez, Larracas, Genise


Edited by Raquel (log)

raquel

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe -Roy Batty

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That Radical Chef website linked on page 1 is awesome.

I am definately planning on cooking/adapting some Philipino recipes soon.


He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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That's interesting.  My mom never fried chicken afterwards, although I do half fry and no fry, depending on my mood.  (I'd say I prefer wet adobo to dry, but either is fine.  The recipe below compromises between the two styles.)  --Soba

distilled vinegar

water

garlic (preferably whole or slightly crushed)

bay leaves (2 or 3 is fine)

salt to taste

pepper to taste (whole black peppercorns are even better -- I like a lot of peppercorns)

chicken, cut into serving pieces

mushroom soy

oil

Combine vinegar, water, garlic, bay leaves, salt and pepper or peppercorns in a large pot or dutch oven, and bring to a boil.  Add chicken and cover.  Bring to a 2nd boil.  Reduce heat and cook for 45 minutes to an hour, or until chicken is tender.  (I prefer our chicken literally falling off the bone.)  Sprinkle with soy sauce and cook for another five to ten minutes.  Remove chicken, and reduce till slightly thickened.  Meanwhile, fry chicken till browned.  Return fried chicken to pot, toss to coat with sauce.

Serve IMMEDIATELY with steamed rice.

Time for bumpage.

I've been craving this for a while now, and this weekend is just the perfect excuse to make it.

What Filipino dishes have you had lately?

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It is really puzzling why Filipino food is not better-known in the U.S.  There are certaintly more people of Filipino descent here than people of Thai or Vietnamese decent, yet Filipino restaurants don't have nearly the same level of visibility as Thai or Vietnamese restaurants.  . . .

I think you are correct in your assessment of the differences between the cuisines you mention. I wonder if maybe Filipinos are less likely to go into business on their own, compared to people of other nationalities? That's just a guess. I would imagine that certain ethnic groups have more of a business tradition than others.

I read somewhere that the Thai government subsidizes Thais that open restaurants in foreign countries. The theory is that getting folks around the world hooked on the food will increase awareness of Thailand, which will, the theory goes, inevitably increase tourism.

Although I have absolutely no knowledge that that's factual.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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There's a large Filipino community in Hawaii (roughly 15% of the total population, according to the 2000 Census -- and about 85% of the Filipinos here are Ilocano). Plenty of Filipino restaurants, most serving home-style food. I don't know of any upscale Filipino restaurant.

Filipino food -- especially popular dishes like pancit, lumpia, and adobo -- has made it into the general local culture. Same with baked goods like ensaimada. Every supermarket has a section for Filipino foods in its "Oriental" aisle. One of the local ice cream chains has an ube (purple sweet potato) flavor. There used to be a Filipino bakery (sadly out of business, though there are several others around) where my husband once ordered an ube roll cake as my birthday cake: lavender cake with purple filling and lavender buttercream frosting! (That really wowed our guests!)

The most recent Filipino foods I've had were puto (bought at a local supermarket -- I ate one, put the rest in the refrigerator, and when I looked again, the whole package was gone!), pancit, and pinacbet (a real favorite of mine -- I pluck out the bittermelon, though, and give that to my husband, who adores it). I also tasted squid guisado, but decided against ordering a whole portion (it tasted much too "fishy").


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Ube is taro, and I like it very much. I actually haven't had any Filipino food for some time. I tried the newish Filipino restaurant in my neighborhood a few months ago, and had a mixed experience. I remember liking my appetizer, but their Adobo was overly salty for my taste. Is it supposed to be really salty?

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Ube is taro, and I like it very much. I actually haven't had any Filipino food for some time. I tried the newish Filipino restaurant in my neighborhood a few months ago, and had a mixed experience. I remember liking my appetizer, but their Adobo was overly salty for my taste. Is it supposed to be really salty?

Here, ube is the word for purple sweet potato. It's not a form of taro. It's very similar to the purple Okinawan sweet potato. Both are sold in supermarkets here. Imported ube jam (for desserts) is also readily available.

Edited to add: Pan, you might be thinking of a Filipino dessert that uses ube and taro. I'm not sure of its name... It's a lavender-colored coconut tapioca pudding that also contains cubes or ube, taro, and chewy mochi (sweet rice) dumplings. Kinda' strange to Western tastes, but I love it and would eat it frequently if it weren't for the cholesterol count!


Edited by SuzySushi (log)

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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I just made chicken adobo last night!

I pretty much cribbed Reynaldo Alejandro's recipe from his book on Filipino cooking. Delicious, but I think that my oh too secret family recipe has... sugar in it.

The best part is that you end up with a sort of demi-glace the next day if you stick the sauce in the fridge. Nummy.

As far as Filipino restaurants not really catching on...

1. I tend to be (slightly) disappointed when I go out to Filipino restaurants, because I have such a fixed idea of what Food A and Food B should taste like. (Drat childhood memories.) So I tend not to go so often.

2. Most USians are not comfortable with offal meat and our (fairly) unique ideas about dessert. I took my fiancé to the Filipino festival in D.C. recently and I caught him boggling at the mais con yelo! (To me, corn is sweet, and thus can be desserty in nature.) He didn't like my offeratory sip of gulaman at sago -- just a different flavor than what he was expecting, I think.

3. USians do love lumpia and pancit, and I think it conforms to the expected ideas about Asian foods being noodly and "light." The Filipino tendency to combine flavors and foods almost randomly can be confusing! I know that my fiancé does not understand how I like champorado (chocolate porridge) with condensed milk and tuyo (little dried salty fishes) on top.

My favorite dishes are tocino, adobo, longanisa, siopao and siomai (but that's really Chinese, though?), champorado, fish balls, chicharron bulaklak, pancit in its infinite permutations, balut, turon, puto bungbung, gulaman at sago, bibingka, lechon/lechon paksiw, IUD (grilled chicken intestines, and I haven't had them in YEARS...), sinigang ng bangus, nilaga, daing ng bangus, diniguan and puto, camaron rebosado, menudo, and I think I better stop before I make myself too hungry...

PS. My uncle used to be the chief electrician on the QE2 cruise liner, and when he took us to the galley, it was the most amazing Filipino spread ever. As it turned out, the cooks were Filipino, and pretty much cooked what they liked. I had the best surprise lunch there belowdecks.


Edited by baranoouji (log)

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Since I'm currently living at home, dinner is Filipino food most nights. Tonight was ginataan na manok with dilao (chicken cooked in coconut milk and flavoured with turmeric), pancit bihon, and pesang isda (a fish soup with ginger and upo -- hairy gourd?). All served, of course, with steamed rice. The chicken is one of my favourites, but I wasn't much of a fan of the fish soup. I don't think the fish was too fresh (dug out from the depths of my mom's freezer), so it wasn't for me.

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Ube is taro, and I like it very much. I actually haven't had any Filipino food for some time. I tried the newish Filipino restaurant in my neighborhood a few months ago, and had a mixed experience. I remember liking my appetizer, but their Adobo was overly salty for my taste. Is it supposed to be really salty?

Here, ube is the word for purple sweet potato. It's not a form of taro. It's very similar to the purple Okinawan sweet potato. Both are sold in supermarkets here. Imported ube jam (for desserts) is also readily available.

Edited to add: Pan, you might be thinking of a Filipino dessert that uses ube and taro. I'm not sure of its name... It's a lavender-colored coconut tapioca pudding that also contains cubes or ube, taro, and chewy mochi (sweet rice) dumplings. Kinda' strange to Western tastes, but I love it and would eat it frequently if it weren't for the cholesterol count!

I'm not sure whether I've had that particular dessert or not.

I think I may have been fooled by the taste, as well as the color. I've never thought "sweet potato" when I've had things with ube in them. Vision over taste?

I guess I owe you an apology for ignorantly "correcting" you. :biggrin:


Edited by Pan (log)

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Pan, you might be thinking of a Filipino dessert that uses ube and taro. I'm not sure of its name... It's a lavender-colored coconut tapioca pudding that also contains cubes or ube, taro, and chewy mochi (sweet rice) dumplings. Kinda' strange to Western tastes, but I love it and would eat it frequently if it weren't for the cholesterol count!

It has various names: ginataang bilo-bilo, ginataang halo halo, ginataan, etc. Ginataan is the most generic and describes anything cooked with coconut milk. It's also one of my favourite Filipino desserts although I can't ever eat a big serving -- a bit too rich. It can be eaten hot or cold. My preferred variation includes taro, plantain, and jackfruit. It looks like a thick whitish soup with different colours floating about due to the fruit.

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My favorite dishes are tocino, adobo, longanisa, siopao and siomai (but that's really Chinese, though?), champorado, fish balls, chicharron bulaklak, pancit in its infinite permutations, balut, turon, puto bungbung, gulaman at sago, bibingka, lechon/lechon paksiw, IUD (grilled chicken intestines, and I haven't had them in YEARS...),  sinigang ng bangus, nilaga, daing ng bangus, diniguan and puto, camaron rebosado, menudo, and I think I better stop before I make myself too hungry...

Some of these I'm familiar with, but others like siopao I'm not. Could you provide a translation, please?

I haven't had champorado in years!

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I'm here in the PI right now...- in my motherland, and I'm sorry to say that I think Filipino foods aren't very well known in other countries..however, all of the foreigners who I know who've come to the PI just LOVE the food here.

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Some of these I'm familiar with, but others like siopao I'm not.  Could you provide a translation, please?

Lo and behold Soba: siopao. And here's another link, just for good measure. Slightly sweet steamed buns filled with either pork or chicken. I've also had a 'chicken special' that has ground chicken, Chinese sausage and hard-boiled egg. Perfect for breakfast on the run or merienda.

Hmmmm. Time to go and get some siopao. It's been a while.


Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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