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"Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day" Zoe Francois (2008–2009)

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I had a very long day today. Finally made it home & found an Amazon box on the front porch. It was a happy moment.

First of all, I have to say to anyone who is reading this thread & hasn't yet bought the book... stop whatever you are doing and buy it!

Zoe, please tell your co-author that I enjoyed both the preface & introduction. (What can I say.... I was a history major, I always have to to read prefaces & introductions).

OK, I've made it to page 74. This is a very readable, enjoyable, not to mention inspiring, book. Regrettably, I must go to bed now, but I can't wait to try some of this stuff.

In short.... if you don't own this book, you truly must. (I have no relation to the author, co-author, their children, their dogs, or their extended families.)

I apologize if this isn't lucid. It really was a difficult day.

pat


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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Wow, that looks fantastic. I think I'm going to take it a step further when I do this tonight and proof the loaf in a banneton if it's not impossibly wet.

Marc

. . . .

Funny you should say that as it's exactly the last thought I remember before I fell asleep last night!

Good luck with the banneton, I've had mixed success with it but in general I find the dough a little too wet to make a lasting impression on the bread. But, I've learned not to discourage people from trying things with this dough, they often make discoveries I wouldn't have!

Let me know how it goes!

Zoe

Well the experiment was a success. I shaped the loaves and put them in the banneton last night and refrigerated them until this morning. I baked directly out of the refrigerator and they look spectacular, except one loaf got a little misshapen. I'll see how they taste tonight but I have high expectations.

Sorry about the poor photography but you'll get the idea:

gallery_26108_4639_13585.jpg

Marc

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I had a very  long day today.  Finally made it home & found an Amazon box on the front porch.  It was a happy moment.

First of all, I have to say to anyone who is reading this thread & hasn't yet bought the book...  stop whatever you are doing and buy it!

Zoe, please tell your co-author that I enjoyed both the preface & introduction.  (What can I say.... I was a history major, I always have to to read prefaces & introductions).

OK, I've made it to page 74.  This is a very readable, enjoyable, not to mention inspiring,  book.  Regrettably, I must go to bed now, but I can't wait to try some of this stuff.

In short....  if you don't own this book, you truly must.  (I have no relation to the author, co-author, their children, their dogs, or their extended families.)

I apologize if this isn't lucid.  It really was a difficult day.

pat

WOW! Thank you so much Pat! I hope you have an easier day today!

I'll pass all of that on to Jeff. We really had a lot of fun writing the book and testing all the recipes so it is wonderful to hear that you are enjoying it!

I'll look forward to more feedback as you start baking more breads.

Zoe F

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Well the experiment was a success. I shaped the loaves and put them in the banneton last night and refrigerated them until this morning. I baked directly out of the refrigerator and they look spectacular, except one loaf got a little misshapen. I'll see how they taste tonight but I have high expectations.

Sorry about the poor photography but you'll get the idea:

gallery_26108_4639_13585.jpg

Marc

Hi Marc,

Oh, this too is very encouraging! You've got me back in the kitchen tonight with my banneton. Have I mentioned how much fun this is!!!

Thank you! Zoe F


Edited by Zoe Francois (log)

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Rather unpromising basic dough after being shaped and retarded overnight in the ‘fridge. (Looked rather like a dead slug!)

gallery_6903_111_26264.jpg

Amazingly, here is the baked loaf:

gallery_6903_111_1024.jpg

Like Pam, I had a horrendous evening and decided to self-medicate by mixing up some Deli Rye dough.

gallery_6903_111_88967.jpg

And here are the crumbs photos, basic recipe on the left, deli rye on the right:

gallery_6903_111_139710.jpg

Kerry Beal (another eG member) arrived early in the am just after the breads had cooled and we sampled them and found them both to be superior in texture and taste. We then went off to conduct some chocolate business and when it came time for lunch opted to return to my place for more bread rather than look for a restaurant. Some soup, some cheese, lots of bread and we feasted like there was no tomorrow. There is but a heel of the rye left and about ½ of the basic loaf!

Please Zoe – a gym membership AND an extra dough 'fridge!!!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Kerry Beal (another eG member) arrived early in the am just after the breads had cooled and we sampled them and found them both to be superior in texture and taste.  We then went off to conduct some chocolate business and when it came time for lunch opted to return to my place for more bread rather than look for a restaurant.  Some soup, some cheese, lots of bread and we feasted like there was no tomorrow.  There is but a heel of the rye left and about ½ of the basic loaf! 

Please Zoe – a gym membership AND an extra dough 'fridge!!!

Hi Anna,

Great minds think alike, I made these same exact breads for a dinner I went to last night. I was having dinner with Suvir Saran, one of my mentors in the food world and a friend. He had tried baking the bread but had mixed reviews. We later came to realize that he was using a very soft flour he had brought back from England. Not nearly enough protein.

Suvir tried the two breads (master and caraway rye) I had baked for him and he was thrilled. We then baked a boule and some naan together and I think he is a convert!!!!

Thanks for sharing these pictures with us!

Yes, I do have a dorm fridge for dough in my basement!

Zoe F

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I got my book today!!  Yay!!

Don't forget to print out the errata stuff. http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/

Oops, now that I think about it, I found that website on your first post.

So many great recipes, so little time. I think I might try the calzone tonight.

pat


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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Made my first 5 minute boule this afternoon.

As usual I failed to read the directions thoroughly and didn't sprinkle the dough with flour before removing it from the bowl. I think that may have resulted in too much deflation, contributing to the lack of large bubbles in the crumb.

The loaf rounded up considerably on the bottom, making me suspect that the hydration might have been a little low.

I was also baking without a stone.

A little disappointing with the dense crumb, but I'm seeing great potential for this method, particularly after eating the better part of a loaf of the rye with caraway variation at Anna's. That was a fabulous bread.

Zoe, I wonder if you or your co-author, (who apparently came into this via rye bread), have any thoughts on the use of strong flour (aka common flour) as the source of gluten in the deli ryes. Also curious about the amount of altus that you would recommend adding to the ryes.

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Made my first 5 minute boule this afternoon. 

As usual I failed to read the directions thoroughly and didn't sprinkle the dough with flour before removing it from the bowl.  I think that may have resulted in too much deflation, contributing to the lack of large bubbles in the crumb. 

The loaf rounded up considerably on the bottom, making me suspect that the hydration might have been a little low. 

I was also baking without a stone. 

A little disappointing with the dense crumb, but I'm seeing great potential for this method, particularly after eating the better part of a loaf of the rye with caraway variation at Anna's.  That was a fabulous bread.

Zoe, I wonder if you or your co-author, (who apparently came into this via rye bread), have any thoughts on the use of strong flour (aka common flour) as the source of gluten in the deli ryes.  Also curious about the amount of altus that you would recommend adding to the ryes.

Hi Kerry,

I'm glad you have tried the method and I'm sure with a little tweaking you can fix the crumb issue that you had in your first loaf.

If the dough was dry, over handled or baked within the first 24 hours it will effect the crumb. you want to make sure that the dough is slack enough or it will fail to give you any nice holes in the bread and it won't store for as long. If the dough was dry enough that you could handle it without a good coating of flour on your hands and on the dough, I suspect you are correct and the hydration was too low.

Lastly if you mixed the dough up and baked it off in the first 24 hours the crumb will be much tighter than in will be after a few days of storage. It gets better with age, as long as the dough is wet enough.

The high protein flour will work beautifully in the rye recipe, as long as it is wet enough. The higher protein flour absorbs much more liquid so you'll have to add more water to the recipe. You can add up to a cup of the altus to the dough as well, this will help to compensate for the high protein flour. You don't want to do much more than a cup because it has no gluten and will start to make the dough leaden when baked.

Please keep me posted!

Thanks, Zoe F

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OK, my first attempt from the new cookbook. It was a late start after we dragged ourselves home from work tonight. We hadn't had all that much for lunch so you can imagine the reception I received to: "No, not yet... I have to take a picture".

As is almost always the case, he was a prince.

The recipe was ridiculously easy yet somehow I managed to get whole wheat flour all over the kitchen. This would not come as a surprise to anyone who has seen me in action. The stove, the floor, the counters & the cook were all well dusted. Just enough remained to lubricate the pizza peel.

My crimping left something to be desired... but despite of all the disclaimers, this was delicious. The crust was, as they say, to die for. It really was wonderful.

We can't get good ricotta cheese here, so I suspect this could have been even better. A year or so ago there was a thread on Egullet on making your own ricotta cheese. I haven't been able to find it. If this rings a bell with anyone, could you please direct me to the original thread?

Even with lousy ricotta cheese this was terrific. And gosh, tomorrow night it's pizza!

pat

gallery_26288_3707_52221.jpg


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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I didn't plan on making the bread tonight but having the dough in the fridge got the better of me...loved it. Pizza tomorrow.


Edited by demiglace (log)

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OK, my first attempt from the new cookbook. 

. . .

That looks truly oustanding, Pat.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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OK, my first attempt from the new cookbook. 

. . .

That looks truly oustanding, Pat.

Thank you Anna. I fear having this dough on hand may be a danger to our waistbands.

pat


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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OK, my first attempt from the new cookbook. 

. . .

That looks truly oustanding, Pat.

Thank you Anna. I fear having this dough on hand may be a danger to our waistbands.

pat

There's no need to fear - it's a fact!!!

Made another deli rye this am and hubby was ecstatic - the stuff is just addictive. Now I need to try pumpernickel and sandwich bread and..... I have no life - but I am making lots of dough. :laugh:


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Perfect recipe to do with those of short attention span (aka "children").

The munchkin greatly enjoyed helping mix up the dough last night, and watching it expand in the bowl during the two hours at roomT.

We 'shaped' a loaf and set it in the fridge overnight (plastic wrap loose, on a ton of cornmeal), then baked it straight from the fridge.

I too failed to have sufficient flour 'on hand' when slashing the loaf, and had fits getting good cuts (perhaps I need a visit to the eGCI knife course). Possibly as a result of this, the loaf didnt rise quite enough. Its a bit doughy but very brown.

No pic 'cause you dont want to see....

Not the best bread I've made but definitely edible. And thats within 13 hours of starting to mix the dough. I expect tomorrow will be much better (if I can wait that long. I may try a second loaf today, to see if part of the issue was the O/N fridge proofing vs 90 min at RT).

At this stage, I think it needs more salt, but since the flavor is supposed to develop over the next two days in the fridge, I'll wait and see.

Despite less than perfect results, I'm pleased with the recipe and outcome. And really appreciative of all the comments and discussion in this topic, since they greatly aided in following the NYT-printed recipe. The video also is helpful.

Wheeeee!


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Believe it or not, the best knife I've found for slashing loaves is the red serrated knife from this cheapy set I got at Target: Clicky

Pam

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Perfect recipe to do with those of short attention span (aka "children").

The munchkin greatly enjoyed helping mix up the dough last night, and watching it expand in the bowl during the two hours at roomT.

We 'shaped' a loaf and set it in the fridge overnight (plastic wrap loose, on a ton of cornmeal), then baked it straight from the fridge.

I too failed to have sufficient flour 'on hand' when slashing the loaf, and had fits getting good cuts (perhaps I need a visit to the eGCI knife course). Possibly as a result of this, the loaf didnt rise quite enough. Its a bit doughy but very brown.

No pic 'cause you dont want to see....

Not the best bread I've made but definitely edible. And thats within 13 hours of starting to mix the dough. I expect tomorrow will be much better (if I can wait that long.  I may try a second loaf today, to see if part of the issue was the O/N fridge proofing vs 90 min at RT).

At this stage, I think it needs more salt, but since the flavor is supposed to develop over the next two days in the fridge, I'll wait and see.

Despite less than perfect results, I'm pleased with the recipe and outcome. And really appreciative of all the comments and discussion in this topic, since they greatly aided in following the NYT-printed recipe.  The video also is helpful.

Wheeeee!

Hi Kouign,

I'll be interested to see what you think in a couple of days. If the bread continues to be dense, after the dough has sat for a few days then I would suspect that the dough is too dry?

Keep me posted. Zoe

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I'm going to mix up the rye bread and bake it on Wednesday. 

Question, I have almost 14 day old basic dough in the fridge.  Should I add a portion of that to the rye loaf or throw it out?

By all means use the "old" dough in your next recipe. It will be great in the rye dough. Just dump the next batch right over the dough and mix it all together! It will jump start the flavor in your fresh batch.

Zoe

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It's very clear that this is a very hot thread.

We are working on our 4th or 5th batch of dough and it is a shear joy.

This batch has 3/4 cup of whole wheat flour -- two lbs of flour total - 3 1/2 cups water and one Tbs. of honey added to basic recipe. Used quick rise yeast.

Let to raise in mold overnight. Should have slashed in the morning. (used sissors).

For steam heated pan on bottom shelf of oven and added one cup hot water when bread went into oven. Lots of steam. All the water had evaperated at about 15 minutes. Oven time 40 minutes at 450 degrees.

gallery_38003_5626_961017.jpg

Here is the result.

gallery_38003_5626_53938.jpg

and the crumb.

gallery_38003_5626_1923494.jpg

The crust and taste are really good.

Already mixed another batch with 2 Tbs. honey.

I calulated the cost per loaf at about 30 - 35 cents.

Great baking to all.

Jmahl


The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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Here is the result.

gallery_38003_5626_53938.jpg

and the crumb.

gallery_38003_5626_1923494.jpg

The crust and taste are really good. 

Already mixed another batch with 2 Tbs. honey.

I calulated the cost per loaf at about 30 - 35 cents. 

Great baking to all.

Jmahl

That is beautiful!!!

Also loved the cost breakdown. So... we are not only having fun & munching delectable breadstuffs, but we are also saving a ton of money. Talk about a win-win situation!

pat


I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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We can't get good ricotta cheese here, so I suspect this could have been even better.  A year or so ago there was a thread on Egullet on making your own ricotta cheese.  I haven't been able to find it.  If this rings a bell with anyone, could you please direct me to the  original thread?

Even with lousy ricotta cheese this was terrific.  And gosh,  tomorrow night it's pizza! 

Here is a recipe for making ricotta, from Nick Malgieri:

3 quarts whole milk

3 Tbsp red wine vinegar

Combine milk and vinegar in a saucepan, and place over low heat. Heat until the mixture reaches 175 degrees. Regulate heat carefully, so as not to exceed this temperature.

While the milk is heating, rinse a cheesecloth or cloth napkin and line a strainer with it. Place over a bowl.

When the ricotta curds become visible on the surface of the milk, remove them with a slotted spoon and transfer to the lined strainer. Allow to drain. (A firmer/drier ricotta can be achieved by allowing the curds to remain at 175 degrees about 5 minutes before draining.)

To make ricotta smooth before using, pulse in a food processor. Makes 1 lb.

Hope this helps!

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We can't get good ricotta cheese here, so I suspect this could have been even better.  A year or so ago there was a thread on Egullet on making your own ricotta cheese.  I haven't been able to find it.  If this rings a bell with anyone, could you please direct me to the  original thread?

Even with lousy ricotta cheese this was terrific.  And gosh,  tomorrow night it's pizza! 

Here is a recipe for making ricotta, from Nick Malgieri:

3 quarts whole milk

3 Tbsp red wine vinegar

Combine milk and vinegar in a saucepan, and place over low heat. Heat until the mixture reaches 175 degrees. Regulate heat carefully, so as not to exceed this temperature.

While the milk is heating, rinse a cheesecloth or cloth napkin and line a strainer with it. Place over a bowl.

When the ricotta curds become visible on the surface of the milk, remove them with a slotted spoon and transfer to the lined strainer. Allow to drain. (A firmer/drier ricotta can be achieved by allowing the curds to remain at 175 degrees about 5 minutes before draining.)

To make ricotta smooth before using, pulse in a food processor. Makes 1 lb.

Hope this helps!

Wow! Thank you. Have you tried doing this? The process doesn't seem quite as mysterious as I had imagined.

pat


Edited by Pat W (log)

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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