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Food-verb events


TAPrice
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Here in Beijing, we have a verb-food event (due to the linguistic differences) : 包饺子 - but this reverses into English as 'Jiaozi (Dumpling) Wrap' so it can be shoehorned into the pattern  :raz:

Just a few simple steps:

Make dough

Make filling

Roll out dough......

gallery_35503_5573_693039.jpg

Wrap Jiaozi dumplings

Boil jiaozi

Eat them and drink beer until you fall over/die of surfeit/ pass-out.

Hurrah!

:biggrin:

We do this here in the States! What a way to spend a Saturday.

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Growing up in Iowa we'd have a hog roast....

Some farmer would drive his pickup trailing with a 2 barrel long hog roaster onto our yard, it would roast all day and at night, everyone would come over, each with their "covered dish" and a 12 pack of cheap beer.

The smell of it would drive you crazy all day long.

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Now that I think about it, a cream tea is a food-verb affair. "Tea" in the merry old UK is a meal, you have tea in the same way you have breakfast and dinner. And cream, is, of course, clotted cream. Which must be had with scones nd jam. So, I give you cream tea, with some allowances for the differeces between Britspeak and USpeak.

“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”
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Now that I think about it, a cream tea is a food-verb affair. "Tea" in the merry old UK is a meal, you have tea in the same way you have breakfast and dinner. And cream, is, of course, clotted cream. Which must be had with scones nd jam. So, I give you cream tea, with some allowances for the differeces between Britspeak and USpeak.

Thank you for introducing all of us to a new term. Strictly speaking, though, Prince William might tee off near his alma mater, but Queen Elizabeth II does not tea with corgis curled up at her feet. Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Thank you for introducing all of us to a new term.  Strictly speaking, though, Prince William might tee off near his alma mater

What's Eton him?

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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