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Rediscovering Common Foods


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On the landscape that is my diet, I tend to focus on the monuments which rise up against the fabric of everyday food. I dream about the next perfectly poached lobster tail or blue beef tenderloin, how I'll eventually splurge again on something rare or expensive. But what about all the good stuff in between those fancy meals?

The other day I steamed some young carrots and sprinkled them with freshly cracked black peppercorns. It was truly delicious. A far cry from those ubiquitous bags of pre-peeled and pre-shaped "baby carrots" and an even farther cry from the gray pepper dust that comes out of small paper packets.

I think carrots deserve their prime spot in the crisper. Everybody eats them but I don't think people always remember how great they can be when done right. And sometimes I get a perfectly pungent hit of the master spice and think WOW it really does belong beside salt on the table.

Do you ever have those moments where something really common is really, really good?

Edited by Peter the eater (log)

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Perfectly steamed broccoli, hit with just a squeeze of lemon juice can be terrific. Same for fresh asparagus, although I add fresh ground pepper. It tastes of spring.

I love a great cucumber, crunchy and fresh tasting when dressed with rice wine vinegar.

Tomato, fresh off the vine, warmed by the sun, and sprinkled with sea salt. Summer in a bite.

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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Plain old cabbage. Move it around in a pan with a small amount of any tasty fat (olive oil, butter, bacon, duck..) and some type of onion, maybe garlic. If you want it for a main dish toss in some leftover meat, and you have a sweet feast. A little fresh ginger or Dijon mustard gilds the lily. It also keeps well so I try to have some in my fridge at all times as a back-up vegetable.

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a HUGE bowl of perfectly cooked (sauce thick and brown..almost caramel color...and the beans still intact) this years crop (insert current year)

pinto beans ...with nothing in them but salt

or toast

:wub:

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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A couple summer's ago we got some fresh peas and carrots from the Amish farmers. They were so fresh and clean tasting!!

The wonderful Ontario peaches, berries and strawberries each summer. It pains me to even look at the imported ( tasteless) crap ass produce our local grocery store gets each winter.

Oh and man oh man did we have some fabulous bagels in S. Florida over xmas. How anyone can consider those inspid grocery store rolls with holes a bagel is beyond me.

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The wonderful Ontario peaches, berries and strawberries each summer. 

Amen, Randi!

I live near a great food city, frequent great produce stores, and the peaches, whatever the provenance, are nothing compared to Ontario's, for flavor or for price. Niagara peaches in August...

I nominate leftover salmon with a slice of buttered baguette and a smear of mayo.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Plain old cabbage.  Move it around in a pan with a small amount of any tasty fat (olive oil, butter, bacon, duck..) and some type of onion, maybe garlic. If you want it for a main dish toss in some leftover meat, and you have a sweet feast. A little fresh ginger or Dijon mustard gilds the lily. It also keeps well so I try to have some in my fridge at all times as a back-up vegetable.

I really love thin sliced cabbage and carrots sauted in butter.

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Nothing beats just plain roasted chicken, nothing fancy,just salt, pepper, rosemary, butter on the skin, straight from the oven.

I can eat a whole one myself...

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Just picked sweet corn, steamed till it's just heated through.  No salt, no butter, just sweet corn.

ETC: spelling

Yum! Not far from where I live, grows some of the best sweet corn I've ever tasted. When corn is in season, I make frequent trips to the farmers market to buy it.

My husband and second born son have been known to shuck it, rinse it, and eat it raw.

Cheryl

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Just picked sweet corn, steamed till it's just heated through.  No salt, no butter, just sweet corn.

Be still my beating heart. The very thought of a fresh picked ear of sweet corn, first of the season sets my knees to quivering.

Just once did the husband drive by a stand, not stop, and remark, upon arrival at home that "there's fresh sweet corn." He had a nice long drive back to The Place, and has never committed such a crime since.

Oh, my, fresh and just picked sweet corn. Add that first tomato from the garden, and I think we've got Eden.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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1.) Mushrooms sauteed in sweet butter with salt, and fresh cracked pepper.

2.) Sourdough bread toasted with butter or rubbed with a garlic clove.

3.) Celery with peanut butter.

4.) Warm corn tortilla, heated on flame, so there are little blackened parts.

5.) Fresh, cold whole milk. Preferably not from a carton but from glass.

A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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One thick slice of a gloriously misshapen, deep red Jersey tomato.

A shake of salt.

Nirvana in two simple steps.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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  • 2 weeks later...

A hot-from-the-oven, made from scratch, old-fashioned American soft dinner roll. Excessive butter optional. I rediscovered these this year and now I make them several times a month, and there's always homemade "brown-and-serve" rolls in my freezer.

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Old fashioned USA style custard. Not flan, not creme brulee--I really like those too--but just regular custard perfectly baked and served chilled. Funny thing is that I remember from when I was a kid that just about every restaurant/diner had custard as a dessert option. Same thing for tapioca or puddings. I used to make those desserts a lot as a teenager.

Ditto for what Sandy or anyone else here says about a perfectly ripe tomato in season served simply, although I don't think I've ever had a Jersey tomato. :sad:

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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bacon...no wait, I eat that all the time.

At the age of six I wanted to be a cook. At seven I wanted to be Napoleon. And my ambition has been growing steadily ever since. ‐ Salvador Dali

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