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eG Foodblog: CaliPoutine, MarketStEl & mizducky - The Shrinking


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Sandy, I'm curious about some of your wording. If you've explained this before, I've missed it. You refer to the time that you were "sober". Now it appears you're drinking some alcohol, no doubt in moderation. Are you trying to imply that you aren't generally sober, or that one must be a teetotaller to be sober? Or am I misunderstanding something? In my experience, one who writes the way you do is probably sober at the time of writing.

My mother recently had to change her diet due to renal failure in combination with diabetes. It was startling to see how many of the foods formerly considered to be best for you (whole-grain breads, for instance) suddenly had to go. I'll be interested to see how you deal with the vegetable thing as the week goes on, and hoping to pick up more tips for her.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Since berries mostly spoil before we get around to using them, I guess I have to start considering dried too.  I just remember giving my elderly grandmother prunes all of the time and thinking they were gross.  But, honestly, I haven't tried them so thanks for the blog - I am going to give them a try.

I have been following along but didn't think there was very much I could contribute to this blog but.........

Try this: Find a clean, large mason jar, preferably a wide-mouth one. Sort through the berries gently to make sure there are no nasties in there BUT DO NOT WASH THEM. Carefully transfer them to the mason jar, put on the lid and screw band and put them on a shelf in the 'fridge. When you want some berries take out a serving, wash them and you are set. I am amazed how long berries stay fresh using this method. There is no need to vacuum seal the jar.

Thank you - I will give it a try as soon as possible. The possibility that I no longer have to hear my husband say "these "insert berry name" are spoiled, why do you keep buying them when you don't ever eat them" has me doing a mental happy dance.

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Hi All. Sorry I've been MIA most of the day. In addition to my cooking jobs, I also work for a Mystery Shopping company. Today I did 4 shops( all mattress stores) in London. I was able to get some grocery shopping done too( for myself and for the Senior meal on Thursday).

Before I left this morning, I had 2 servings of the same cereal I had yesterday( 4 points, 1 point of milk and 1 point of raisins). I felt a bit lightheaded about an hour later so I had a Kashi Go Lean protein bar(3 points). I'm a sucker for those red clearance stickers at Target.

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I didnt get home until well after 5pm and since my boys usually eat at noon, they were very anxious to eat.

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Every since the pet food scare, I've stopped buying commerical wet dog food. I give the boys a spoon of baby food along with a spoon of plain yogurt. They seem to enjoy it. Here you have Oliver and Harley. Oliver is the black and Tan. They're both Standard dachsunds. Harley is a wire-hair.

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I unloaded my groceries. I went to Food Basics and stocked up on fruit and veggies among other things.

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Did I mention that we have a brand new kitchen? There was a discussion in my kitchen reno thread regarding a TV in the kitchen. As you can see, I did buy one.

I knew I wanted to use the leftover brown rice from last night to make a dish called Rice Fried vegetables. Its from this month's issue of Vegetarian Times. I'm not a vegetarian, but we don't eat any red meat.

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I didnt have a few ingredients so I made some substitutions. It came out really well.

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I also picked up some Tilapia. I'd planned on using a recipe from A New Way To Cook, but when I read it again, I didnt have the majority of the ingredients. I reverted to an old standbye, Parmesan crusted Tilapia. I made a mixture of shredded parm, reduced sodium Old Bay, a few tbls of bread crumbs, 1 pat of butter, lemon juice and light mayo.

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I slathered the mixture on the fish and then broiled it.

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It came out really well and the entire meal was very filling. I had 1 piece of fish and Robin had 2. I figure about 3 points for a piece and 6 for the side dish.

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I'm actually feeling full.

Oh, I forgot to mention that I had a 6" turkey sub from Subway for lunch. I also had a bag of baked Lays. I think that meal has 9 points.

Edited by CaliPoutine (log)
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Since berries mostly spoil before we get around to using them, I guess I have to start considering dried too.  I just remember giving my elderly grandmother prunes all of the time and thinking they were gross.  But, honestly, I haven't tried them so thanks for the blog - I am going to give them a try.

I have been following along but didn't think there was very much I could contribute to this blog but.........

Try this: Find a clean, large mason jar, preferably a wide-mouth one. Sort through the berries gently to make sure there are no nasties in there BUT DO NOT WASH THEM. Carefully transfer them to the mason jar, put on the lid and screw band and put them on a shelf in the 'fridge. When you want some berries take out a serving, wash them and you are set. I am amazed how long berries stay fresh using this method. There is no need to vacuum seal the jar.

I'll have to try this too. Thanks Anna!!

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One could ask, Why is a confirmed cheesehead drinking lactose free milk? Truth to tell, I probably should be taking Lactaid tablets with my meals, for as the salad above should indicate, I still work cheese into a lot of my dishes, and I think I am somewhat lactose intolerant, as many African-Americans are. Perhaps I should just work less cheese into my dishes.

Sandy--I am lactose-intolerant as well, and, it took me a while, but after some serious research and study, I learned something both useful, and welcome (in a culinary sense). Dairy is largely made up of a sugar (lactose), fat, and protein.

OK--enough background. Here is the good part: The more fat there is in the dairy product, the less lactose there is.

In other words, a person with mild lactose-intolerance will be happier drinking cream than drinking (regular) lowfat milk. With cheeses, a good general rule is to stay away from whey products and the really fresh un-aged cheeses like ricotta. But lots of us can tolerate hi-fat triple cremes and hard aged cheeses just fine.

If you are going to be stuck with a food issue, it might as well be one that lets you eat cheese and whipped cream :biggrin:

Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther
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Randi, I forgot how beautiful your new counter tops are . . . and what on earth is a "Mystery Shopping company"?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Randi, I forgot how beautiful your new counter tops are . . .  and what on earth is a "Mystery Shopping company"?

Thanks Peter. I really love them.

Mystery shopping is a when you go into a store, pretending you're going to buy something. You evaluate the sales associates, store enviorment, etc. You write a report regarding the entire experience. Not too exciting actually. I'm still waiting to be assigned a restaurant.

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After dinner( we didnt have anything for dessert). I prepped Robin's food for tomorrow.

Here is her snack. Its actually 1 pear cut up to fit both sides. I soaked the pear in some acidulated water first. I didnt buy those curve bars, they were a free sample sent to me by General Foods.

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Robin loves canned salmon. I can't stand it. I hate to even touch it. But, the things we do for love eh?

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I used a little lemon juice, light mayo and chopped italian parsely. Salmon is actually pretty high in points( 4 for 1/4 of the can). I probably gave her half a can. I also packed one of those whole wheat pita's I bought today( 3 points) and some lettuce.

I measured out her museli too for the morning. After she does the treadmill, I told her to add 1/2c of the yogurt and half a banana.

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Ok, folks, thats it for me. I'm going to finish watching The Biggest Loser Couple's. How appropriate eh?

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So here's what's been happening with me since last I posted:

I dropped Mr. E. off at another of his weekly appointments -- he does keep his calendar busy! As he'd be taking the bus home, I was now free for the rest of the afternoon. So I did errands and looked for bloggable photo-ops.

In the same shopping center as E.'s appointment is a Trader Joe's, so I dropped in to pick up more Crystal Geyser, and a couple other sundries:

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This TJ's is in the middle of Hillcrest, San Diego's "official" gayborhood, and also one of the most densely populated neighborhoods in town. Those demographics means this TJ's is absolutely mobbed at almost every hour of operation. I've gotten practiced at slipping in, grabbing what I need, and running away before I get run over by a shopping cart. Have I mentioned recently how much I hate shoppers blocking aisles with their carts while they stand there reading labels or yakking with friends or just woolgathering in the middle of everything? :laugh:

Anyway, one of the things I grabbed was this:

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Susan, you asked about hydration stuff. One of my hydration strategies is to always have some beverage I'm working on, all the time. Even if it's caffeinated and I piss half of it away, at least fluid intake is happening. I don't think any of the Hansen's natural sodas have caffeine, even the colas; the flavors are more interesting than most, and I taste less aftertaste from the Splenda than with other artificial sweeteners.

Then on to grab lunch at one of my favorite healthy-eating haunts:

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Veg'n'Out is yer basic classic hippy-dippy vegetarian burger joint. Yeah, yeah, I've heard all the various negative opinions about vegetarian foods that attempt to mimic carnivore food--that somehow it's cheating, that the imitations are pathetic, blah blah blah. But those naysayers have not endeavored to wrap their jaws around this beauty:

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Piled above and below the pretty convincing burger patty is cheese, lettuce, tomato, soy bacon strips, barbeque sauce, and fried onion rings. The creamy tarragon dressing on the side salad is very good. Other choices for sides include french fries, the salad du jour (today's was apple/potato), or soup. This burger isn't cheap at nearly nine bucks--but you get a lot for your money. I love being able to indulge in a big ol' sloppy burger, and with the caloric savings of having a soy patty instead of beef I can indulge myself a lot more often.

My little jar of Better than Bouillon was almost out, which gave me an photo-op excuse to drop by here:

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Henry's is a regional natural foods chain, and a good, more moderately-priced alternative to Whole Paycheck. Their produce offerings are extensive:

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They also have really good prices on nutritional supplements (omega-3 capsules and glucosamine tablets are an integral part of my health regimen--both help the osteoarthritis, and the omega-3s do all sorts of other good things for one's heart, nerves, and more).

I headed home, but found I had some time to kill before I needed to start supper ... so I decided to do something radical: go for a walk. :laugh:

(to be continued...)

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Sandy, I'm curious about some of your wording.  If you've explained this before, I've missed it.  You refer to the time that you were "sober".  Now it appears you're drinking some alcohol, no doubt in moderation.  Are you trying to imply that you aren't generally sober, or that one must be a teetotaller to be sober? Or am I misunderstanding something?  In my experience, one who writes the way you do is probably sober at the time of writing.

My mother recently had to change her diet due to renal failure in combination with diabetes.  It was startling to see how many of the foods formerly considered to be best for you (whole-grain breads, for instance) suddenly had to go.  I'll be interested to see how you deal with the vegetable thing as the week goes on, and hoping to pick up more tips for her.

There is "sober" as commonly used, and "sober" as used by those in recovery.

Ordinarily, someone is "sober" whenever he or she is not displaying any signs of intoxication from alcohol consumption, even if he or she does at other times. When a recovering alcoholic uses the term, it means that he or she does not consume alcohol, period.

Even though I've never been a 12-stepper*, I've used the term in that sense to refer to the period when I abstained completely. I have been known to consume four mixed drinks in a two-hour period on Saturday nights, but otherwise, I don't drink much still.

*One of Philadelphia's oldest folk traditions is the annual Mummers Parade on New Year's Day. The event features elaborate, colorful costumes and handmade floats, marching bands composed entirely of string and reed instruments ("string bands") whose members wear fancy plumed backpieces, dance numbers worthy of a Broadway show -- again performed by elaborately costumed men and women -- and comic groups who either stage parody skits of current events or parade around in dresses and face paint; the last of these are all-male bands known as "wenches". One of the common dances wenches do as they strut up Broad Street is the two-step, and heavy drinking has a long pedigree among the comic wenches. So perhaps it's not surprising that, for the past decade or so, one comic club has a wench brigade known as the Twelve-Steppers. Needless to say, they march sober.

Sandy,

You mention that your roomate can't eat sodium.  I pulled out my Old Bay( both the regular and the reduced sodium).  The first ingredient is Celery Salt.  Is there a zero sodium Old Bay I'm missing?

No, there isn't, and there's the rub. Actually, he hasn't cut out all the sodium from his diet, but he probably should. Salt substitute is also out, of course, because it contains potassium; I don't know whether salt-free seasoning blends have too much of the same problem ingredient in them -- and if those reduced-sodium soups are any guide, reading the nutrition data may not help me. I discovered this to my chagrin when roomie asked me to buy him some canned soup on my most recent grocery trip. I discovered by reading the Campbell's soup labels that many of their lower-sodium soups have a good deal of potassium in them, enough to keep them off the shopping list. Because our labeling laws do not require manufactures to list potassium content, I had no way of knowing whether the same was true for Progresso's lower-sodium soup; all I knew was that it had to had some, for potassium chloride was listed as an ingredient.

Sandy--I am lactose-intolerant as well, and, it took me a while, but after some serious research and study, I learned something both useful, and welcome (in a culinary sense).  Dairy is largely made up of a sugar (lactose), fat, and protein. 

OK--enough background.  Here is the good part:  The more fat there is in the dairy product, the less lactose there is. 

In other words, a person with mild lactose-intolerance will be happier drinking cream than drinking (regular) lowfat milk.  With cheeses, a good general rule is to stay away from whey products and the really fresh un-aged cheeses like ricotta. But lots of us can tolerate hi-fat triple cremes and hard aged cheeses just fine.

If you are going to be stuck with a food issue, it might as well be one that lets you eat cheese and whipped cream :biggrin:

Well, well, well, whaddaya know! I really should avoid low-fat cheese and milk!

Not that I'd eat low-fat cheese anyway: divalasvegas is right -- low-fat cheese is an abomination. The only exception I have found to this rule is Cabot's light Cheddar, which is actually edible. Fat-phobes who have sworn off cheese (why?) might want to take note.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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It was a beautiful day in the neighborhood--in the mid-50s, so a little chilly for my blood (I've lost all my New York/Boston/Seattle imperviousness to cold from barely six years of living in Southern California), but the sun is welcome after the drenching we got all last weekend:

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My neighborhood is not only eminently walkable, but studded with all sorts of points of interest for the foodie as well as the antiques-hound--Adams Ave. bears the nickname "Antique Row," as celebrated by this restaurant:

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This place does a land-office business for weekend brunch, but I've never tried it because I'm allergic to waiting in line to eat. :rolleyes:

This place has gotten a lot of good reviews, but I haven't had a chance to try it yet either--so many restaurants, so little time:

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I have tried this one--Cantina Mayahuel. My dining companion's mahi-mahi was wonderful, my chicken had a great sauce but was a little on the dry side:

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For everyday quick lunches, this place is more my speed:

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There's some sort of unspoken law that every Southern Californian must live within walking distance of a serviceable corner taco shop. :laugh: This one fills the bill quite nicely.

Oh, and then there's this market:

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Just look at that character-soaked facade! I just love this place's vibe. It's an old-school corner grocery--most of the stock is pretty basic, but lurking in the back is an awesome carniceria (Mexican-oriented butcher's counter) with some really good bargains.

Anyhow, time for my walk to be over, and for me to get home and start dinner.

(To be continued...)

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As I mentioned before, figuring out how to mesh my eating preferences with that of Mr. E has been a bit of an adventure, as he's very wary of any foods that stray too far from meat-and-potatoes middle-American fare--especially anything that might even possibly contain the slightest hint of spiciness. However, sometimes he surprises me. A few weeks ago he started talking enthusiastically about the Chinese restaurant he'd lunched at with a friend. Upon some probing, though, I discovered that the restaurant in question was a branch of Pickup Stix, a really mediocre fast food chain. :rolleyes: Right then I made a vow to myself that I'd at least try to turn him on to something better. And I pulled that off tonight, with a chicken/mushroom/bok choy stirfry, using the vegetables and one of the boneless skinless breasts I bought the other day, plus items from my stash of seasonings. I went really gentle on the seasonings, though--I think even ginger root would displease Mr. E if its presence were to get too assertive. So--a little bitty bit of ginger, garlic, shallots, light soy sauce, and sesame oil constituted the seasonings on this dish.

The mise en place, awaiting a ride in my wok (we will diplomatically ignore the dismal state of said wok's seasoning :laugh: ):

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Finished:

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Plated:

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And--hurrah! He liked it! In fact, he asked for seconds, and declared it one of my more pleasing efforts. Score! And since the whole dish contained just one chicken breast for the two of us, plus a whole bunch of veggies, my regimen was pleased too.

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I did say I'd fill you in on my commute, didn't I?

It's similar in form to my previous one; in fact, it begins at the same station, and I catch the same Regional Rail train. However, I take it in the opposite direction:

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In my first foodblog, I gave you the history of Philadelphia's two other central railroad stations. Here's the one I missed: When it opened in 1984 as part of the Center City Commuter Connection (better known as the "Commuter Tunnel"), Market East Station bought 101 years of train service from the historic Reading Terminal above it to an end. The tunnel, which was named the Civil Engineering Achievement of the Year the year it opened, tied together the suburban services of the former Pennsylvania and Reading railroads, giving Philadelphia something only one other North American city (Toronto) and no other US city has: a single, unified regional rail network. I've actually had the occasion to ride a train all the way through the tunnel once, heading from Yardley to Swarthmore on the R3 West Trenton-Elwyn line.

And this time, there's no bus. My train trip to Yardley takes about 55 minutes.

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The gentleman in this photo works in the kitchen at Mil-Lee's Lunch, a restaurant a block north of my office that serves decent homestyle food. I imagine that this eatery is what Alice's Restaurant would look like now, and you can get just about anything you want there. Except that.

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From the station, I can either take the long way to the office, via South Main Street, following the kids who take the train to the Hebrew school at the top of the College Avenue hill:

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or I can take the shortcut to my end of the building, through the inbound parking lot:

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onto a quiet residential lane:

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then left onto a dead-end street and right onto the 17th tee at the Yardley Country Club.

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That's the maintenance building for my office through the trees in the far distance. You can also see a co-worker making his way to the building.

Taking the long route to my office takes about 10 minutes. The shortcut takes five. So far, I haven't deemed the extra calories I could burn worth the extra five minutes.

My lunch today began with last night's dinner:

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While I'm at it, is it just me, or does anyone else find Hellman's canola oil mayonnaise sweeter and/or a little more liquid than their regular variety?

The only other ingredients I added to this chicken salad were chopped celery and celery seed:

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and the result I ate during that online new hire orientation.

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I don't think I'm cutting calories or anything like that by buying canola mayo; I believe the main difference is that canola oil is higher in monounsaturated fats.

Okay, it's getting late again, and the talking heads are still going on about the New Hampshire primary. Locally, they were talking about the Second Coming -- oops, I mean the inauguration of Philadelphia's 98th mayor:

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and there were huge lines stretching around City Hall tonight -- half the city's population (or so it seemed) turned out to shake his hand at an open house he hosted.

But I'm getting off track and ahead of myself. When I get up, I'll get into the exercise portion of my week, such as it is for now.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Hurrah indeed, Your Fab Duckiness! One tiny food revelation a week for Mr. E. I'm inspired that you, Randi and Sandy are taking the New Year's weight loss topic for the team, each in your different ways.

I'm also cheered and inspired that this is an out, Queer three-way discussion, because most of my weight-loss chat in the last year has involved a gay friend and my adored lesbian cousin. GF has been on one diet or another since I met him, and hasn't dropped a pound. (He has had a facelift and Lasix. His partner is a professional ballroom dancer who weighs, like, 83 pounds.) He was the first person who told me that anorexia wasn't the province of teenage girls -- that gay men bought into it too.

My gorgeous, talented cousin (who lives about fifty miles from Randi) was a plus-size model before she broke down and came out. 5'11" 180 best distributed pounds I've ever seen. Her partner was (and is) very large -- 5'8" 300. In the first year of their beautiful love affair, my cousin gained 100 pounds, and threw off all those society-based taboos about women and weight.

Two years later she lost a hundred pounds in a year and showed up at my daughter's wedding looking like the lipstick lesbian guys pant over. Then she had a baby and is a Big Girl post partum. She's back to Big is Fab and who cares about what men and society think? But she's told me, in private, that she hates it.

Down the rabbit hole -- it really does seem that the straight/gay world is topsy turvey about weight issues. Not that it matters, but I'd love to hear what you guys think.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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While I'm at it, is it just me, or does anyone else find Hellman's canola oil mayonnaise sweeter and/or a little more liquid than their regular variety?

No, it's not just you, I've noticed it as well......the sweetness has actually become more pronounced recently I think and I'm finding it off-putting lately. I think I'll go back to regular.....(of course, West of the Mississippi, it's Best Foods.......)

And Sandy, WHERE is your snow??? It's almost Mid-January in Philly, and it looks like Spring !!! Yikes..........

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Before I went to sleep last night, I made Robin's snack box for today.

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If I take something like that to work, it's gone by 9am.

My stepdaughter always complains we have nothing 'nice' to eat in the house... no cookies, chips, snacks etc. It's because having those around makes me nervous. having something good to eat in my deskdrawer, makes me nervous. I can't stop thinking about it until I eat it. I could NEVER eat just a handful of chips for lunch.. so I only buy a large bag every two weeks and then we eat it all in 10 minutes. I've always wondered about this, and now I guess I know what it means - it's my old brain that's making me nervous:

For those who missed my previous rants about the Lizard Brain from my last couple of blogs, this article gives a nice succinct explanation. I especially like this key quote:
Have you ever wondered why you reach for that pile of hot greasy fries while you tell yourself you are on a diet? The answer is that you have three brains, and the older brains were wired to put on weight long ago when food was scarce. Your old brains are not easily controlled by your fancy new brain hardware that reads diet books.

very enlightening.

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By the way, thanks to all of you for reading along and chiming in. It's the interaction that makes this blogging thing so gratifying. If there are any questions we've missed as we've been posting along, please let us know so we can do our part in keeping the conversational ball in the air.

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for a low sodium diet drink thats not carbonated, im totally hooked on sugar free iced tea/tea concentrates.

Davinci makes a good one that is only 5mg sodium per serving, and i find that i rarely use as much concentrate as they recommend, so im getting less than 2-3mg sodium per drink. I used it mostly as a flavoring for water, and its a regular part of my hydration strategy.

Ive even taken to making the concentrates myself with high quality tea, and that lasts at least a couple of weeks in the fridge.

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MizDucky, congrats on making a happy meal for Mr E and yourself!

Perhaps you told us, though I did not catch it. Are you living in the home with Mr. E? Whether you are or not, it must be very challenging to provide so many personal needs for somebody you dont really know. Do you find that you enjoy each other's company, or do you keep the relationship strictly professional?

I used to prepare food that my grandpa could heat up in the oven. This is a man who had literally never turned on a stove or run a load of wash in his life, so when grandma passed, he had a lot of new challenges to deal with. He'd been proudly telling me that he was learning to cook, but one day when I arrived, he had poured a can of plain drained green beans into a pot and turned it on high. The smell was gawd-awful and the pot was a total loss. To help avoid the seemingly inevitable deadly house fire, I started making casseroles and other freezable foods in single serving portions for him to heat and eat. The only rule was that he hated onions. But not knowing that until a few weeks into the program, I'd actually fed him tons of them, and he loved my food anyways. Moral: Sometimes silence is OK.

Perhaps stir-fries will be a good way to go for Mr E. He will manage to eat some vegetables, and you can always spice up your portion. Maybe roast chicken followed by chicken soup from the leftovers would work as well. Good luck working it out.

Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther
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This is one great and informative blog so far, keep up the good work

The dinners looked fantastic, especially the parmesan crusted tilapia.

I even went so far as to log it into the Weight Watcher sight, Recipe builder to get a points value on it and saved it as a 'favorite" . I definitely intend to try this one out on the near future.

And this old porch is like a steaming greasy plate of enchiladas,With lots of cheese and onions and a guacamole salad ...This Old Porch...Lyle Lovett

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Good Morning,

Its 9am and I havent eaten breakfast yet. I am hungry though!! I'm waiting for the California Closet installers to show up before I jump on the treadmill. Late last year, we added a 576sq ft addition to our house as well as redoing the kitchen. We have a huge walk in closet in our new bedroom that will store all our clothes, shoes, etc. We're also having a dedicated space so I can store all my equipment that doesnt fit into the kitchen.

I made some tuna salad this morning so I can take my lunch today.

There was a recent thread discussing store brands vs. generic brands. This is Market Pantry solid albacore tuna from Target. Its really good and less than $1.00 per can. I added somel ight mayo, celery, green onion, italian parsely, lemon juice and reduced sodium Old Bay. I don't measure out mayo anymore, as I can pretty much eyeball a tbls or two. I'll take a whole wheat pita, lettuce, cucumber and a serving of baked lays.

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Of course my boys get the tuna water and the can!!

Ok, the closet ppl are here, time for me to work out!!

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So, this is a really really unhealthy view I have, but does anyone else share my feelings?

I find that if I don't eat breakfast, I'm not as hungry throughout the day  :huh: I wonder why that is?

Hmmm, thats interesting. I've noticed that too but because I'm diabetic, I can't skip breakfast. Prior to starting the Byetta, I wasnt hungry until lunch time, probably because I ate bigger dinners than I eat now. Now, I'm starving when I get up in the morning.

Anyone else want to chime in?

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So, this is a really really unhealthy view I have, but does anyone else share my feelings?

I find that if I don't eat breakfast, I'm not as hungry throughout the day  :huh: I wonder why that is?

Shelby, I'm doing low carb, and I when I started, I had to force myself to eat breakfast, since that is the recommendation. In the last couple of months, I have stopped, because, I typically am not hungry in the morning, and can go until afternoon without food. Yesterday, I didn't get to eat lunch until almost 2pm, which is later than normal, and I was hungry, but yes, I can go longer without food, then with, and I am still losing weight. It goes against conventional wisdom, like you said.

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