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"After dinner", liqueurs, etc.

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I've always enjoyed a nice cognac or port with my cigar. Depends on what I've had to eat, mood, environment, and many other factors. Aside from the single malt, cognac, armagnac, port, and the traditional drinks -- specifically, what's your favorite?

I have been a long time fan of "43" (Quarenta y Tres). Lately, I've been looking for something else, and have wanted to "broaden my horizons" so to speak. I tried "Tia Maria" -- it was good, I could see myself ordering it again. I also had something, which I think is discontinued -- it was "Sambuca Caffe" -- very good.

What's your favorite after dinner, liqures, etc.??? Thank you.

Eric

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My most recent after dinner, or lunch, or snack obsession-

limoncello. Ice cold in a small cordial glass.

Jeff

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I'll usually choose drinking dessert over eating it! Here are a few of my favorites:

Licor 43

Belle de Brillet pear cognac (not always easy to find but big stores can usually get it)

A good glass (or 2) of port

Quady Essencia Orange Muscat (sunshine in a glass, imo)

Happy New Year, y'all!

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After dinner or cordials? Any favorites? Thanks.

Eric

I always like Bailey's Irish Creme

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Benedictine or cocktails containing it (eg de la Louisiane). Also love to wrap up an evening of epicurean hedonism with a Sazerac.

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I'm obsessed with amari lately. Complex and interesting but not too sweet. Perfect digestif in my opinion.

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Benedictine or cocktails containing it (eg de la Louisiane). Also love to wrap up an evening of epicurean hedonism with a Sazerac.

Tell me about Sazerac -- thanks!

Eric

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I'm obsessed with amari lately.  Complex and interesting but not too sweet.  Perfect digestif in my opinion.

You're the third person who recommended Amari to me lately. What exactly is it -- is that the brand name? Thanks.

Eric

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No, it's a category of Italian liqueurs. Amaro means "bitter" in Italian (plural is amari) and they are usually served as a digestif after a meal. (Campari is also an amaro and I think would be an exception to the digestif rule.) They are incredibly complex, aid in digestion, and all have very different flavor profiles as a result of being infused with different botanicals. Look for them behind the bar at Italian restaurants. My favorites include Averna, Nonino, Lucano, Cio Ciaro and Bassano.

Amaro can be a bit of an acquired taste - it is definitely bitter. My advice is to try as many as you can, and do not start with Fernet Branca!

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Benedictine or cocktails containing it (eg de la Louisiane). Also love to wrap up an evening of epicurean hedonism with a Sazerac.

Tell me about Sazerac -- thanks!

Eric

A Sazarac is a cocktail from New Orleans. A simple but wonderfully complex libation as good in the summer as in the winter. The Liqueur in it is Herbsainte which is an anisette made in New Orleans. Here is the way I make mine.

Sazerac

2 oz Old Overholdt

¼ oz Demerara Syrup

3 dash Peychauds Bitters

Rinse

Herbsaint (Can substitute Absente, Pernod or Ricard)

Glass: Rocks

Garnish: Lemon Peel (Discarded)

Ice: None

Take 2 Rocks Glasses. In Glass #1, put Crushed Ice and Herbsaint.

In Glass #2 put Rye, Demerara and Peychaud’s Bitters. Stir Briefly. Add ice and stir.

Throw out Ice and Herbsaint from Glass #1.

Strain Glass #2 into Glass # 1. Twist lemon peel over drink then discard.

This Cocktail is served with no ice in the glass.

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No, it's a category of Italian liqueurs.  Amaro means "bitter" in Italian (plural is amari) and they are usually served as a digestif after a meal.  (Campari is also an amaro and I think would be an exception to the digestif rule.)  They are incredibly complex, aid in digestion, and all have very different flavor profiles as a result of being infused with different botanicals.  Look for them behind the bar at Italian restaurants.  My favorites include Averna, Nonino, Lucano, Cio Ciaro and Bassano.

Amaro can be a bit of an acquired taste - it is definitely bitter.  My advice is to try as many as you can, and do not start with Fernet Branca!

Bitter liqueurs go by different names by language (Amaro, Amer, Bitter, etc.,.) and can vary by botanic intensity, brix, color and flavor profile. As mentioned above, some like Campari are also traditionally served as an aperitif, opening the palate.

Amaro Montenegro can be a good one to start, and you may want to try first on ice with a squeeze of lemon. In time you'll be sipping straight.

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All great info -- thank you very much.

Eric

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Pampero Anniversario rum from Venezuela with one or two cubes in it.  Very yummy.

If you haven't already, try Ron Zacapa Centenario.

Eric

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Hm. I always thought of the Negroni as a pre-dinner drink; bracing and appetite-stimulating. Sort of like finishing a meal with a dollop of sorbet. But YMMV.

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I don't often drink straight (but I am working to it) but I fequently have coffee laced with grand marnier, creme de cacao, frangelico or Cpt Morgans original spiced gold rum (or a combination of the above)

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I'm with Mayur to a degree. I think a negroni is a great drink any time of day or night but I sure am fond of them before overly stimulating my pallet with a glutinious amount of delecious food.

Toby?? Old Overholt and Herbsaint. Not Rittenhouse and some good absinthe?

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That was from the first (Summer) menu at The Violet Hour, and I went as classic as possible, without going to cognac. I think of that version as the "gateway" Sazarac. Once you got them hooked, and they are puttty in your hands, then you hit them with the Primo dope. I think that a Ritt/ab might be a bit hot and dry for the first time Saz drinker.

Last night I had a 1X1 Aperol and Campari with a slice of orange. It made me feel less gluttonous after a meal at Blackbird.

Edit: cause I forgot to add something


Edited by Alchemist (log)

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Benedictine or cocktails containing it (eg de la Louisiane). Also love to wrap up an evening of epicurean hedonism with a Sazerac.

Tell me about Sazerac -- thanks!

Eric

A Sazarac is a cocktail from New Orleans. A simple but wonderfully complex libation as good in the summer as in the winter. The Liqueur in it is Herbsainte which is an anisette made in New Orleans. Here is the way I make mine.

Sazerac

2 oz Old Overholdt

¼ oz Demerara Syrup

3 dash Peychauds Bitters

Rinse

Herbsaint (Can substitute Absente, Pernod or Ricard)

Glass: Rocks

Garnish: Lemon Peel (Discarded)

Ice: None

Take 2 Rocks Glasses. In Glass #1, put Crushed Ice and Herbsaint.

In Glass #2 put Rye, Demerara and Peychaud’s Bitters. Stir Briefly. Add ice and stir.

Throw out Ice and Herbsaint from Glass #1.

Strain Glass #2 into Glass # 1. Twist lemon peel over drink then discard.

This Cocktail is served with no ice in the glass.

That's pretty much the drink I was talking about though yeah I use Wild Turkey for the rye, Jade Edouard for the absinthe rinse, and about half as much sugar.

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Benedictine, Drambuie or a nice Grand Marnier (100 or 150 if I am feeling flush), maybe with a dark strong coffee on the side. :wub:

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