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Marmish

Waffle Makers

59 posts in this topic

If you want a great flippable waffle maker, I cannot endorse the Nordicware Waffler enough.

No electrical element to burn out, no cord to lose. The ones I have are some 20+ years old, and going strong. The ease of them makes the deeper pockets just fine.

Just think low-tech.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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The Krups DD-912 is another reasonably well made "home flipover" iron that is still available here and there for closeout prices. See my review here:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R2NQW5SH0819Z...#R2NQW5SH0819ZA

Like the Krups, The Waring is also not the best made device in the universe but is probably well worth $60.

My experience with these deep pocket "belgian" irons is different from Lisa's above. I like them very much. I find they give an excellent texture - crisp on the outside, soft in the middle - that I can't quite duplicate on other designs, and that includes my beloved over-engineered vintage electrics from the 20's, 30's, and 40's.

When the Krups finally decides to die, I will likely fall back on Snowangels excellent suggestion.

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I'm in the market for a Belgian waffle iron/maker and am hoping I can get some recommendations of units that folks here have used and liked or didn't like.

I have a VillaWare heart-shaped regular waffler that's gotten light-to-moderate use for 8 or 9 years now that I'm happy with - it works fine and produces thin attractive waffles. Now I'm yearning to tackle Belgian waffles so I need a new machine.

I purchased a flip-maker about 5 years ago from QVC (can't remember the brand) that broke on its 3rd use and immediately went back. I've looked at the home flip waffle makers on Amazon and some other sites and see that negative reviews run about 1 out of 3 for the VillaWare, Waring & Cuisinart makers with the biggest problem being that the machines tend to blow a fuse and stop working after a very few uses so that makes me a somewhat leary of them, but other than that the reviews are quite positive for them. Presto makes a flip machine that's a little different and less expensive that has very good reviews.

What waffle maker do you have? Is it a flip maker or regular? Is there a real benefit to the flip makers? I live alone and don't need a commercial unit. What can you recommend?

Thanks for your advice, I'm looking forward to great belgian waffles in the very near future!

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FWIW...My Cusinart Belgian waffle maker works just fine and has for 8 years. It gets fairly regular use, plus once in a while I fire it up to make and freeze a triple batch. I wish I had one that did more than one at a time.


Edited by pax (log)

“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”

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I recently bought the B&D square unit, based on the recommendation of Cook's Illustrated. Other than the low price, I am not overjoyed with my decision. Number one, the grids cannot go in the dishwasher; bummer. Number two, it takes too long and doesn't really get hot enough to make browned, crispy waffles with the Krusteaz mix, which is my favorite. And Number three, the waffles are too thin; I'm used to the ones I got from our old GE unit, last made about twenty years ago.

Ray

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A few days ago, I used our "American-style" waffle iron to make some Chocolate Waffle Cookies...

gallery_51259_4126_4855.jpg

I just rediscovered this post. And wouldn't you know: not long ago, the King Arthur Flour blog posted this about baking cookies and brownies in a waffle iron. Since I do love the crunchy edges of brownies, I think I may need to give this a go.

Now, I'm off to cook the waffle batter that's been resting in the fridge overnight....

MelissaH


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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I'm bumping up this topic because a person in the L.A. area posted a comment on my blog indicating that she has a

New, never used, in original box Armaid Grill and Waffler as well as a vintage Osterizer with a copper base.

The Armaid is not rare and not all that expensive, made by Knapp-Monarch between 1938 and 1941. However it is unusual to find one that is unused. They were a mid-line sturdy appliance that held up well and was a bit faster baking than many others.

The Osterizer with the copper base is fairly rare.

In any event if anyone in the L.A. area is interested just PM me and I will provide the email address.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Thanks for bumping this Andie. It reminds me of a question I've had for some time: how do people feel about the non-commercial variant of the rotating waffle irons? These are the waffle irons that flip upside down when you rotate the handle (presumably so the batter better fills the lower side of the cavity?). When I was an undergrad the cafeteria had a commercial model that prepared my "dinner of last resort" on a pretty regular basis. Are the residential varieties any good?


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Almost everyone I know that has them is really enthusiastic about them.

Unfortunately for my taste, the new ones are only for Belgian waffles which are not my preference.

I much prefer the thinner, crisp waffles.

They are not a recent invention though some companies seem to be pushing the idea that they are.

In 1939 Manning Bowman introduced the Twin-O-Matic waffler at the 1939 Worlds Fair, which was extremely popular and a very efficient baker.

I've been looking for the one I bought some twenty years ago. I packed it away so well I can't find it! I packed it and some other appliances when I moved up here in 1988 and have never unpacked them. I can't even remember what all I have in that trunk. :blink:

Like others of that era, it is very Art Deco in styling. Here's one.

Second to the bottom on the page.

Over the years I have met several owners of these vintage wafflers who have been using them successfully for decades.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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